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Belfer Center Home > Events Calendar > Back From The Hague Summit: The Next Steps for Nuclear Security

 
Back From The Hague Summit: The Next Steps for Nuclear Security

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Back From The Hague Summit: The Next Steps for Nuclear Security

Panel Discussion
Series: Project on Managing the Atom Seminar Series
Open to the Public - Belfer Center Library, Littauer-369
March 31, 2014
10:00-11:30 a.m.

Speakers: Matthew Bunn
William H. Tobey
Moderator: Gary Samore

Related Projects: Managing the Atom, International Security, Science, Technology, and Public Policy

Description:

The Belfer Center's Executive Director for Research Gary Samore will moderate a discussion with Professor of Practice Matthew Bunn and Senior Fellow William H. Tobey on take-aways from the recent Nuclear Security Summit in the Hague and on priorities for strengthening nuclear security in the summit’s aftermath.

Contact:

MTA Project Coordinator
Project on Managing the Atom 79 JFK St, Mailbox 134 Cambridge, MA 02138
Harvard University
John F. Kennedy School of Government
Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
Email: joshua_anderson@hks.harvard.edu
Phone: 617-495-4219
Fax: 617-495-0606

Related Publications

March 18, 2014

Advancing Nuclear Security: Evaluating Progress and Setting New Goals

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom, Nickolas Roth, Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom and William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

In the lead-up to the nuclear security summit, Advancing Nuclear Security: Evaluating Progress and Setting New Goals outlines what was accomplished in a four-year effort launched in 2009 to secure nuclear material around the globe—and what remains to be done. The effort made significant progress, but some weapons-usable nuclear materials still remain “dangerously vulnerable." The authors highlight the continuing danger of nuclear and radiological terrorism and call for urgent action.

 

 

March 13, 2014

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter: December 2013 - February 2014

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Siegfried Hecker Honored For Commitment to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism; William Tobey Briefed Nuclear Security Summit Sherpas; Vladimir Dvorkin Participates in Luxemburg Forum Meeting;Graham Allison Briefs Senior Executives on Nuclear Terrorism and more.

 

 

March 11, 2014

"Beyond Nuclear Summitry: The Role of the IAEA in Nuclear Security Diplomacy After 2016"

By Trevor Findlay, Senior Research Fellow, Project on Managing the Atom/International Security Program

There has been much speculation as to what might replace the Nuclear Security Summits after 2016. One candidate touted as a suitable inheritor of the summits’ mantle is the International Atomic Energy Agency. In this discussion paper, Trevor Findlay examines whether and to what extent the IAEA could and should do so, what form its role might take, and how the Agency and summiteers might prepare for such an eventuality.

 

 

CNNC Press Briefing Center

March 10, 2014

"How Beijing Can Help Prevent Nuclear Terrorism"

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, China has indeed made strides in strengthening its system for protecting nuclear facilities and improving its so-called MPC&A—the material protection, control, and accounting of nuclear materials. In this Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists op-ed, Hui Zhang argues that to make sure nuclear security systems are actually implemented effectively, the development of a strong security culture—in which the relevant individuals hold a deeply rooted belief that insider and outsider threats are credible—is imperative...

 

 

December 2013

Planning for Success at the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit

By William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

In the dead of night on July 28, 2012, three senior citizens, including an 82-year-old Catholic nun, Sister Megan Rice, broke into the Y-12 National Security Complex near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, site of the US Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF). This self-proclaimed “Fort Knox of uranium” is America’s central repository for weapons-grade uranium.

....The security failings revealed by the nun and her fellow protesters are legion. The protesters were on the site for over an hour and 20 minutes, trekking about seven-tenths of a mile as the crow flies, but far longer as they traversed a steep ridge. They pierced fences equipped with sophisticated sensors. Yet the Y-12 Protective Force failed to spot them until they enjoyed unimpeded access to the exterior of the HEUMF forabout 20 minutes. Had these individuals been well-armed, well-equipped terrorists, instead of Bible-toting peace protesters, the incident would have been far more dire.

 

 

 

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