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Richard N. Rosecrance

Mailing address

Littauer 325
Belfer Center for Science & International Affairs
79 John F. Kennedy Street, Mailbox 53
Cambridge, MA, 02138

Richard N. Rosecrance

Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

Contact:
Telephone: (617)-495-2715
Fax: (617)-495-8963
Email: richard_rosecrance@hks.harvard.edu

 

Experience

Richard Rosecrance is an Adjunct Professor at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government, a Research Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Los Angeles. He was formerly a Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Walter S. Carpenter, Jr., Professor of International and Comparative Politics at Cornell University. He served in the Policy Planning Council of the Department of State. He has written or edited more than a dozen books and many scholarly articles. The singly authored works include Action and Reaction in World Politics (1963); Defense of the Realm: British Strategy in the Nuclear Epoch (1968); International Relations: Peace or War? (1973); The Rise of the Trading State: Commerce and Conquest in the Modern World (1986); America's Economic Resurgence (1990); and The Rise of the Virtual State: Wealth and Power in the Coming Center (1999). The edited volumes include The Dispersion of Nuclear Weapons: Strategy and Politics (1964); The Future of the International Strategic System (1972); America as an Ordinary Country (1976); The Domestic Bases of Grand Strategy (1993); The Costs of Conflict (1999); and The New Coalition of Great Powers (2001).

He is the principal investigator of UCLA's Carnegie Project on "Globalization and Self Determination".  He has received Guggenheim, Rockefeller, Ford, Fulbright, NATO, and many other fellowships. He was President of the International Studies Association and served as Director of UCLA's Center for International Relations from 1992 to 2000. He has held research and teaching appointments in Florence (the European University Institute); Paris (the Institut de Sciences Politiques), London (Kings College London, the London School of Economics, and the International Institute for Strategic Studies), and Canberra (The Australian National University). He has lectured widely in East Asia and Europe. His recent book on the "virtual state" has been translated into Japanese, Chinese (Taiwan), German and will shortly appear in Arabic and Mandarin and in a French volume of colloquy and comments of French scholars entitled "Débat sur L’État Virtuel". Professor Rosecrance is now at work on a book on international mergers which compares U.S. with European political and economic strategies.

 

 

By Date

 

2014

Forthcoming

The Next Great War? The Roots of World War I and the Risk of U.S.-China Conflict

Book

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

The Next Great War? combines reinterpretations of history, applications of international relations theory, and discussions of the lessons that the outbreak of war in 1914 offers for the analysis of contemporary U.S.-China relations.

 

2013

White House Photo

July 28, 2013

"Want World Domination? Size Matters"

Op-Ed, New York Times

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

"...[T]he joining of the two continents would increase trade and employment. It would facilitate Mr. Obama's goal of doubling American exports and increasing investment and consumption. Ms. Merkel would smile as German cars and medical equipment poured into American markets, and Washington would return the favor with microprocessors, biotechnical devices and liquid natural gas. If the deal is concluded next year as planned, economists estimate the creation at least one million jobs over 10 years, and a 0.5 percent increase in G.D.P., on both sides of the Atlantic. The new pact would draw together 259 of the Fortune 500 companies. Investment flows and tourism would bubble to new heights."

 

 

January 2013

"Dialogue of the Deaf?"

Event Summary

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

Harvard and Beijing representatives met in Beijing January 13–16, 2013 to discuss challenges and opportunities in U.S.-China relations. Richard Rosecrance, director of Harvard's U.S.-China Relations Project, writes that despite a warm welcome and  cordial personal relations on both sides, "no agreements were reached on short or long term policy."

 

2012

AP Photo

May-June 2012

"Rising Sun in the New West"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, American Interest, issue 5, volume 7

By Mayumi Fukushima, Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Yuzuru Tsuyama

In the 20th century, Japan was in many ways the weathervane of international politics. It will likely remain that in the 21st century. How so? As Europe and the United States cope with their difficulties, and as problems in China, India, Russia and elsewhere emerge more clearly, Japan is very likely to join a renascent West.

 

 

January 23, 2012

"Reinventing Europe"

Op-Ed, ecfr’s blog

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

"When Jean Monnet proposed the first integrative steps for Europe to take, he was thinking of creating a powerful economic instrumentality that would contend on equal terms with the then superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union.  Now, if Europe and America pursue the closer economic union that Angela Merkel envisions, Europe can think of a new united West which can deal on equal terms with a rising but disunited East." 

 

2010

Winter 2010-11

"Center and China Foundation: Can Conflict Be Avoided Between U.S. and China?"

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

Economic forecasts suggest that China will approximate U.S. economic power sometime in the 2020s, and the question arises: Can conflict then be avoided, or will we extend the litany of past conflicts?

 

 

AP Photo

May/June 2010

"Bigger is Better: A Case for a Transatlantic Economic Union"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Foreign Affairs

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

After World War II, "trading states" seemed to be charting a new path forward. But small was not beautiful. Even great powers found themselves negotiating larger markets through economic associations with others. It's time the United States became such a power.

 

2009

AP Photo

August 2009

"Improving U.S.-China Relations: The Next Steps"

Policy Memo

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

A higher Renminbi will have two advantages: for the United States, it will help to equilibrate the past trade imbalance; for China, it will stimulate consumption (and enhance imports). It will therefore help China switch from a purely exporting strategy to one that maintains domestic growth through internal consumption.  The goods that were to be sent abroad can now be consumed by an increasingly middle class nation at home.  These steps will bring China and the United States closer economically and increase international stability. However, unless the military-security relations of the two countries improve, this will not be a sufficient remedy for the two nations' long term problems.

 

 

March 2009

Power and Restraint: A Shared Vision for the U.S.-China Relationship

Book

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Gu Guoliang

Over several years, some of the most distinguished Chinese and American scholars have engaged in a major research project, sponsored by the China- U.S. Exchange Foundation (USEF), to address the big bilateral and global issues the two countries face. Historically, the ascension of a great power has resulted in armed conflict. This group of scholars—experts in politics, economics, international security, and environmental studies—set out to establish consensus on potentially contentious issues and elaborate areas where the two nations can work together to achieve common goals. Featuring essays on global warming, trade relations, Taiwan, democratization, WMDs and bilateral humanitarian intervention, Power and Restraint finds that China and the United States can exist side by side and establish mutual understanding to better cope with the common challenges they face.

 

 

AP Photo

March 3, 2009

"U.S., E.U. World Community Organizers"

Op-Ed, The Providence Journal

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

"In the Mideast, community organizing requires not a two-state solution, but an approximation to a two-state confederation. The Palestinians cannot survive (even geographically) without access to Israel and the outside world. Israel cannot continue its imperial role in the West Bank (and the use of force in Gaza), nor can it withdraw. Autonomy and exclusion is not possible for two such inextricably related foes. They can exist only together."

 

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