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Richard N. Rosecrance

Richard N. Rosecrance

Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

Contact:
Telephone: (617)-495-2715
Fax: (617)-495-8963
Email: richard_rosecrance@hks.harvard.edu

 

 

By Region

 

White House Photo

July 28, 2013

"Want World Domination? Size Matters"

Op-Ed, New York Times

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

"...[T]he joining of the two continents would increase trade and employment. It would facilitate Mr. Obama's goal of doubling American exports and increasing investment and consumption. Ms. Merkel would smile as German cars and medical equipment poured into American markets, and Washington would return the favor with microprocessors, biotechnical devices and liquid natural gas. If the deal is concluded next year as planned, economists estimate the creation at least one million jobs over 10 years, and a 0.5 percent increase in G.D.P., on both sides of the Atlantic. The new pact would draw together 259 of the Fortune 500 companies. Investment flows and tourism would bubble to new heights."

 

 

AP Photo

May-June 2012

"Rising Sun in the New West"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, American Interest, issue 5, volume 7

By Mayumi Fukushima, Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Yuzuru Tsuyama

In the 20th century, Japan was in many ways the weathervane of international politics. It will likely remain that in the 21st century. How so? As Europe and the United States cope with their difficulties, and as problems in China, India, Russia and elsewhere emerge more clearly, Japan is very likely to join a renascent West.

 

 

AP Photo

May/June 2010

"Bigger is Better: A Case for a Transatlantic Economic Union"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Foreign Affairs

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

After World War II, "trading states" seemed to be charting a new path forward. But small was not beautiful. Even great powers found themselves negotiating larger markets through economic associations with others. It's time the United States became such a power.

 

 

August 31, 2006

No More States? Globalization, National Self-Determination, and Terrorism

Book

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Arthur A. Stein

This provocative and compelling book explores the impact of globalization and terrorism on this trend, arguing convincingly that the era of national self-determination has finally come to an end.

 

 

August 31, 2006

"Globalization and its Effects: Introduction and Overview"

Book Chapter

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations, Etel Solingen, Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security and Arthur A. Stein

"Globalization has the effect of incapacitating states as autonomous units."

 

July/August 2008

"Separatism's Final Country"

Journal Article, Foreign Affairs, issue 4, volume 87

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Arthur A. Stein

"Muller argues that ethnonationalism is the wave of the future and will result in more and more independent states, but this is not likely. One of the most destabilizing ideas throughout human history has been that every separately defined cultural unit should have its own state. Endless disruption and political introversion would follow an attempt to realize such a goal. Woodrow Wilson gave an impetus to further state creation when he argued for "national self-determination" as a means of preventing more nationalist conflict, which he believed was a cause of World War I...."

 

July/August 2008

"Separatism's Final Country"

Journal Article, Foreign Affairs, issue 4, volume 87

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Arthur A. Stein

"Muller argues that ethnonationalism is the wave of the future and will result in more and more independent states, but this is not likely. One of the most destabilizing ideas throughout human history has been that every separately defined cultural unit should have its own state. Endless disruption and political introversion would follow an attempt to realize such a goal. Woodrow Wilson gave an impetus to further state creation when he argued for "national self-determination" as a means of preventing more nationalist conflict, which he believed was a cause of World War I...."

 

 

February 15, 2007

"When Terrorism Succeeds -- and Fails"

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

Dissidents undermine their legitimacy by resorting to mass killings and extortion.

 

 

August 31, 2006

"Globalization and its Effects: Introduction and Overview"

Book Chapter

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations, Etel Solingen, Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security and Arthur A. Stein

"Globalization has the effect of incapacitating states as autonomous units."

 

White House Photo

July 28, 2013

"Want World Domination? Size Matters"

Op-Ed, New York Times

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

"...[T]he joining of the two continents would increase trade and employment. It would facilitate Mr. Obama's goal of doubling American exports and increasing investment and consumption. Ms. Merkel would smile as German cars and medical equipment poured into American markets, and Washington would return the favor with microprocessors, biotechnical devices and liquid natural gas. If the deal is concluded next year as planned, economists estimate the creation at least one million jobs over 10 years, and a 0.5 percent increase in G.D.P., on both sides of the Atlantic. The new pact would draw together 259 of the Fortune 500 companies. Investment flows and tourism would bubble to new heights."

 

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