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Richard N. Rosecrance

Richard N. Rosecrance

Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

Contact:
Telephone: (617)-495-2715
Fax: (617)-495-8963
Email: richard_rosecrance@hks.harvard.edu

 

 

By Publication Type

 

March 2009

Power and Restraint: A Shared Vision for the U.S.-China Relationship

Book

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Gu Guoliang

Over several years, some of the most distinguished Chinese and American scholars have engaged in a major research project, sponsored by the China- U.S. Exchange Foundation (USEF), to address the big bilateral and global issues the two countries face. Historically, the ascension of a great power has resulted in armed conflict. This group of scholars—experts in politics, economics, international security, and environmental studies—set out to establish consensus on potentially contentious issues and elaborate areas where the two nations can work together to achieve common goals. Featuring essays on global warming, trade relations, Taiwan, democratization, WMDs and bilateral humanitarian intervention, Power and Restraint finds that China and the United States can exist side by side and establish mutual understanding to better cope with the common challenges they face.

 

 

August 31, 2006

No More States? Globalization, National Self-Determination, and Terrorism

Book

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Arthur A. Stein

This provocative and compelling book explores the impact of globalization and terrorism on this trend, arguing convincingly that the era of national self-determination has finally come to an end.

 

August 31, 2006

"The "Acceptance" of Globalization"

Book Chapter

By Luisita Cordero and Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

"International relations are not simply a state of anarchy. There are profound elements of hierarchy in the international system, and even authority relationships...."

 

 

August 31, 2006

"The Dilemma of Devolution and Federalism: Secessionary Nationalism and the Case of Scotland"

Book Chapter

By Arthur A. Stein and Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

"In 1707, England and Scotland completed their union. Yet more than a quarter of a millennium later Scottish nationalism made a reappearance...."

 

 

August 31, 2006

"Who Will Be Independent?"

Book Chapter

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

"International history has witnessed trends toward and away from the amalgamation of disparate political units—in Europe and elsewhere...."

 

 

August 31, 2006

"Globalization and its Effects: Introduction and Overview"

Book Chapter

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations, Etel Solingen, Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security and Arthur A. Stein

"Globalization has the effect of incapacitating states as autonomous units."

 

January 2013

"Dialogue of the Deaf?"

Event Summary

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

Harvard and Beijing representatives met in Beijing January 13–16, 2013 to discuss challenges and opportunities in U.S.-China relations. Richard Rosecrance, director of Harvard's U.S.-China Relations Project, writes that despite a warm welcome and  cordial personal relations on both sides, "no agreements were reached on short or long term policy."

 

July/August 2008

"Separatism's Final Country"

Journal Article, Foreign Affairs, issue 4, volume 87

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Arthur A. Stein

"Muller argues that ethnonationalism is the wave of the future and will result in more and more independent states, but this is not likely. One of the most destabilizing ideas throughout human history has been that every separately defined cultural unit should have its own state. Endless disruption and political introversion would follow an attempt to realize such a goal. Woodrow Wilson gave an impetus to further state creation when he argued for "national self-determination" as a means of preventing more nationalist conflict, which he believed was a cause of World War I...."

 

 

Fall 2005

European Mergers Trump US Acquisitions: Legitimacy Makes All the Difference

Journal Article, International Politics, issue 3, volume 42

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

 

 

Summer 2005

Mergers and Acquisitions

Journal Article, National Interest, issue 80

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations

 

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We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev.