Belfer Center Home > People > Joseph E. Aldy

« Back to list of experts

Joseph E. Aldy

Mailing address

79 John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge, MA, 02138

Link to CV

Joseph E. Aldy

Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Contact:
Telephone: 617-496-7213
Email: joseph_aldy@hks.harvard.edu

 

Experience

Joe Aldy is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, a Nonresident Fellow at Resources for the Future, and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation. In 2009–2010, he served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment, reporting through both the National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate Change at the White House. Aldy was a Fellow at Resources for the Future from 2005–2008 and served on the staff of the President's Council of Economic Advisers from 1997–2000. He also served as the Co-Director of the Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements, Co-Director of the International Energy Workshop, and Treasurer for the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists before joining the Barack Obama Administration. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University, a Master of Environmental Management degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment, and a B.A. from Duke University.

 

 

By Date

 

2016

Creative Commons

May 3, 2016

"Subsidies in the Wrong Places Skew Renewable Energy's Power"

Op-Ed, The New York Times

By Joseph E. Aldy, Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

"Given the existing low-cost competition in a no-growth market, renewable developers face tough investment challenges absent new policies. A carbon tax could substantially increase market demand for renewable power and encourage the retirement of pollution-intensive coal-fired power plants."

 

 

February 2016

"Bilateral Cooperation between China and the United States: Facilitating Progress on Climate-Change Policy"

Paper

By Joseph E. Aldy, Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, Thomas Brewer, Ji Chen, Sha Fu, Yue Qi, Robert N. Stavins, Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government; Member of the Board; Director, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, Robert C. Stowe, Former Associate Director, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Pu Wang, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Xiaohua Zhang, Shuang Zheng and Ji Zou

The Harvard Project has released a paper on China-U.S. cooperation on climate-change policy—jointly authored with researchers at China's National Center for Climate Change Strategy and International Cooperation.

 

2015

November 30, 2015

"'Trust But Verify' Should Be a Motto of Paris Climate Talks"

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Joseph E. Aldy, Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

The success of the COP21 talks will hinge on the creation of a transparency-and-review mechanism to ensure that countries are meeting their voluntary emissions-reduction targets.

 

 

Creative Commons

November/December 2015

"Need Transparency and Review Mechanisms"

Op-Ed, The Environmental Forum

By Joseph E. Aldy, Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

"Given the interest in climate finance by many developing countries, the United States and other donors could condition financial transfers on developing country participation in the transparency mechanism."

 

 

November 2015

"Evaluating Mitigation Effort: Tools and Institutions for Assessing Nationally Determined Contributions"

Policy Brief

By Joseph E. Aldy, Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

The emerging pledge and review approach to international climate policy provides countries with substantial discretion in how they craft their intended emission mitigation contributions. The resulting heterogeneity in mitigation pledges places significant demands for a well-functioning transparency and review mechanism. In particular, the specific forms of intended contributions necessitate economic analysis in order to estimate the aggregate effects of these contributions as well as to permit "apples-to-apples" comparisons of mitigation efforts. This paper discusses the tools that can inform such analyses as well as the institutional needs of climate transparency.

 

 

November 2015

"Evaluating Mitigation Effort: Tools and Institutions for Assessing Nationally Determined Contributions"

Discussion Paper

By Joseph E. Aldy, Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

The emerging pledge and review approach to international climate policy provides countries with substantial discretion in how they craft their intended emission mitigation contributions. The resulting heterogeneity in mitigation pledges places significant demands for a well-functioning transparency and review mechanism. In particular, the specific forms of intended contributions necessitate economic analysis in order to estimate the aggregate effects of these contributions as well as to permit "apples-to-apples" comparisons of mitigation efforts. This paper discusses the tools that can inform such analyses as well as the institutional needs of climate transparency.

 

 

November 9, 2015

"As the US Heads to Climate Talks, It Seeks a Plan to 'Trust but Verify'"

Op-Ed, Conversation

By Joseph E. Aldy, Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

"The ability to review the outcomes for a mitigation program can demonstrate whether a country undertook a good-faith effort to deliver on its pledged commitment and build trust among those participating in an agreement. An effective system to collect, analyze and disseminate information about countries' pledges can also facilitate subsequent negotiations."

 

 

August 2015

"The Competitiveness Impacts of Climate Change Mitigation"

Discussion Paper

By Joseph E. Aldy, Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements and William A. Pizer

The authors examine the effect of real energy prices and a simulated carbon price on production and net imports. They find modest adverse competitiveness effects for energy-intensive industries.

 

 

June 18, 2015

"A Blessing to Slow Climate Change"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Harvard Gazette

By Francis Schüssler Fiorenza, Joseph E. Aldy, Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements and Naomi Oreskes

"Last year at the United Nations General Assembly, heads of state came together to talk about climate change. We had an announcement on carbon pricing signed on by more than 70 countries, more than 1,000 businesses — reflecting this emerging view of both those in public policy and those using the technologies in the business world — that pricing carbon is the way to get us off of fossil fuels, to create that incentive for the technologies that will allow us to still enjoy the level of economic development that we aspire to, without having an adverse impact on the climate."

 

 

June 2015

"Policy Surveillance in the G-20 Fossil Fuel Subsidies Agreement: Lessons for Climate Policy"

Discussion Paper

By Joseph E. Aldy, Faculty Affiliate, Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Inadequate policy surveillance has undermined the effectiveness of multilateral climate agreements. To illustrate an alternative approach to transparency, the author evaluated policy surveillance under the 2009 G-20 fossil fuel subsidies agreement. The Leaders of the Group of 20 nations tasked their energy and finance ministers to identify and phase-out fossil fuel subsidies. The G-20 leaders agreed to submit their subsidy reform strategies to peer review and to independent expert review conducted by international organizations.

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.