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Hui Zhang

Hui Zhang

Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

Contact:
Telephone: 617-495-5710
Fax: 617-496-0606
Email: Hui_Zhang@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2011 (continued)

2010

"China’s Fissile Material Production and Stocks"

Report Chapter

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

Hui Zhang wrote the chapter "China" in the International Panel on Fissile Materials report Global Fissile Material Report 2010: Balancing the Books.

 

2010

May 2010

"China and Nuclear Disarmament"

Report Chapter

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

Hui Zhang wrote a chapter entitled "China and Nuclear Disarmament" in the International Panel on Fissile Materials report Reducing and Eliminating Nuclear Weapons: Country Perspectives on the Challenges to Nuclear Disarmament.

 

 

April 2010

"China's Perspective on a Nuclear-Free World"

Journal Article, Washington Quarterly, issue 2, volume 33

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

Hui Zhang argues that China's pledge of no-first-use of nuclear weapons, while constraining its nuclear force at a minimum level, maintaining its deeply de-alerted status, and upholding its long-standing position to support complete nuclear disarmament, has set a good example for other nuclear nations, in particular the two nuclear superpowers.  Zhang suggests that Beijing believes that all nuclear states should adopt a no-first-use policy and redefine the role of nuclear weapons in their national security doctrines. Although China stands ready to support the nuclear-free agenda, it is up to the two countries with the overwhelming number of the world's warheads to take the lead.

 

2009

Digital Globe/ISIS via AFP

July 23, 2009

"Is North Korea's Reprocessing Facility Operating?"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

In mid-June, North Korea threatened to weaponize all of its newly separated plutonium.  Air samples and satellite imagery, however, don't show evidence that Pyongyang is actively reprocessing its spent nuclear fuel.  But this doesn't mean the North isn't reprocessing; there are numerous reasons why its activities wouldn't be detected by commercial satellites and off-site air sampling.  The United States and China, must act now to force North Korea to halt plutonium production, stop all weapons tests, and immediately return to the Six-Party Talks.

 

 

July 16, 2009

"Decommissioning the North Korean Nuclear Facilities: Approaches and Costs"

Conference Paper

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

Hui Zhang presented his paper "Decommissioning the North Korean Nuclear Facilities: Approaches and Costs," at the Institute for Nuclear Materials Management 50th Annual Meeting, in Tucson, Arizona, 12-16 July 2009.

 

 

Penn State RS and EC

July 16, 2009

"On China’s Commercial Reprocessing Policy"

Conference Paper

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

Hui Zhang presented his paper "On China’s Commercial Reprocessing Policy," at the Institute for Nuclear Materials Management 50th Annual Meeting, in Tucson, Arizona, 12-16 July 2009.

 

 

AP Photo

July/August 2009

"Ending North Korea's Nuclear Ambitions: The Need for Stronger Chinese Action"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Arms Control Today, volume 39

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

North Korea has recently taken a series of provocative steps to challenge the international community. If unchecked, North Korea will surely increase the quantity and quality of its arsenal. Even worse, once Pyongyang has more than enough weapons for its deterrent, it might be tempted to sell the surplus. The longer the crisis lasts, the more nuclear capable North Korea will become and the more difficult it will be to roll back Pyongyang's nuclear ambitions.  A nuclear North Korea would put China's national interests at great risk. Beijing can increase pressure on Pyongyang, using positive inducements and punitive measures. The chances are low, however, that Beijing will radically adjust its North Korea policy, at least for the near future. Beijing will continue to maintain its bottom-line approach, avoiding war on the Korean peninsula and an abrupt collapse of the Kim regime. From China's perspective, these scenarios must be avoided at all costs because they are contrary to China's primary interest in a stable environment.

 

 

AP Photo

June 19, 2009

"Don't Play Nuclear Chicken with a Desperate Pariah"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Foreign Policy

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

"This game of escalation will go on and on until North Korea gets what it desires most from Washington: a reliable security assurance. Of course, no one likes to yield to dictators. But ultimately, playing chicken with a desperate and nuclear-armed North Korea is too risky to endeavor. The more isolated the North Koreans become, the more likely they will be to use the nuclear card in threatening two hostages: South Korea and Japan. Everyone loses that game"

 

 

AP Photo

June 18, 2009

"Assessing North Korea's Uranium Enrichment Capabilities"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

In mid-June 2009, Pyongyang threatened to begin enriching uranium in an effort to expand its nuclear weapons program.  While much is known about North Korea's plutonium production program, far less is understood about what enrichment capabilities Pyongyang currently possesses. Dr. Hui Zhang argues that the evidence seems to indicate that North Korea currently has a very limited capacity for enrichment.

 

 

EL Generalissimo

June 9, 2009

"China Should Abandon All-Carrot Approach"

Op-Ed, Global Times

By Hui Zhang, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

Hui Zhang's Op-Ed, "China Should Abandon All-Carrot Approach," was published in The Global Times, Beijing. In the Op-Ed Zhang argues "China should show its willingness to contribute to international nonproliferation efforts," by "abandon[ing] its temperate approach to North Korea."

 

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