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Spring 2010

"Sex and the Shaheed: Insights from the Life Sciences on Islamic Suicide Terrorism"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 4, volume 34

By Bradley Thayer, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1995–1997 and Valerie M. Hudson

Conventional explanations for suicide terrorism, which center on international anarchy, U.S. intervention in Islamic nations, and religious approval for suicide terrorism, do not sufficiently describe this phenomenon. The life sciences offer explanations that explore the influence of high levels of gender differentiation, polygyny, and obstructed Middle Eastern marriage markets on Islamic suicide terrorism. Combining conventional and life sciences explanations offers greater insight into the causes of Islamic suicide terrorism and the motivation of suicide attacks, allowing policymakers to develop better approaches to counter this threat.

 

 

 

October, 2005

Bare Branches: The Security Implications of Asia's Surplus Male Population

Book

By Valerie M. Hudson and Andrea Den Boer

What happens to a society that has too many men? In this provocative book, Valerie Hudson and Andrea den Boer argue that, historically, high male-to-female ratios often trigger domestic and international violence. Most violent crime is committed by young unmarried males who lack stable social bonds. Although there is not always a direct cause-and-effect relationship, these surplus men often play a crucial role in making violence prevalent within society.

 

December 10, 2010

"Correspondence: Life Sciences and Islamic Suicide Terrorism"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 3, volume 35

By Mia Bloom, Bradley Thayer, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1995–1997 and Valerie M. Hudson

Mia Bloom responds to Bradley Thayer and Valerie Hudson's Spring 2010 International Security article, "Sex and the Shaheed: Insights from the Life Sciences on Islamic Suicide Terrorism."

 

 

AP Photo

Spring 2010

"Sex and the Shaheed: Insights from the Life Sciences on Islamic Suicide Terrorism"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 4, volume 34

By Bradley Thayer, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1995–1997 and Valerie M. Hudson

Conventional explanations for suicide terrorism, which center on international anarchy, U.S. intervention in Islamic nations, and religious approval for suicide terrorism, do not sufficiently describe this phenomenon. The life sciences offer explanations that explore the influence of high levels of gender differentiation, polygyny, and obstructed Middle Eastern marriage markets on Islamic suicide terrorism. Combining conventional and life sciences explanations offers greater insight into the causes of Islamic suicide terrorism and the motivation of suicide attacks, allowing policymakers to develop better approaches to counter this threat.

 

 

December 10, 2010

"Correspondence: Life Sciences and Islamic Suicide Terrorism"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 3, volume 35

By Mia Bloom, Bradley Thayer, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1995–1997 and Valerie M. Hudson

Mia Bloom responds to Bradley Thayer and Valerie Hudson's Spring 2010 International Security article, "Sex and the Shaheed: Insights from the Life Sciences on Islamic Suicide Terrorism."

 

AP Photo

Winter 2008/09

"The Heart of the Matter: The Security of Women and the Security of States"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 3, volume 33

By Valerie M. Hudson, Mary Caprioli, Bonnie Ballif-Spanvill, Rose McDermott and Chad F. Emmett

A multidisciplinary theoretical and empirical investigation of the “women and peace” thesis not only proves that the physical security and well being of women is directly linked to the security of the state, but it explains more of the variance in state peacefulness than do conventional measures such as level of democracy, level of wealth, and preponderance of Islamic civilization. Scholars and policymakers would therefore do best to analyze the security of women when considering the linkage between state security and peacefulness.

FULL TEXT AVAILABLE>>

 

 

October, 2005

Bare Branches: The Security Implications of Asia's Surplus Male Population

Book

By Valerie M. Hudson and Andrea Den Boer

What happens to a society that has too many men? In this provocative book, Valerie Hudson and Andrea den Boer argue that, historically, high male-to-female ratios often trigger domestic and international violence. Most violent crime is committed by young unmarried males who lack stable social bonds. Although there is not always a direct cause-and-effect relationship, these surplus men often play a crucial role in making violence prevalent within society.

 

October, 2005

Bare Branches: The Security Implications of Asia's Surplus Male Population

Book

By Valerie M. Hudson and Andrea Den Boer

What happens to a society that has too many men? In this provocative book, Valerie Hudson and Andrea den Boer argue that, historically, high male-to-female ratios often trigger domestic and international violence. Most violent crime is committed by young unmarried males who lack stable social bonds. Although there is not always a direct cause-and-effect relationship, these surplus men often play a crucial role in making violence prevalent within society.

 

AP Photo

Winter 2008/09

"The Heart of the Matter: The Security of Women and the Security of States"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 3, volume 33

By Valerie M. Hudson, Mary Caprioli, Bonnie Ballif-Spanvill, Rose McDermott and Chad F. Emmett

A multidisciplinary theoretical and empirical investigation of the “women and peace” thesis not only proves that the physical security and well being of women is directly linked to the security of the state, but it explains more of the variance in state peacefulness than do conventional measures such as level of democracy, level of wealth, and preponderance of Islamic civilization. Scholars and policymakers would therefore do best to analyze the security of women when considering the linkage between state security and peacefulness.

FULL TEXT AVAILABLE>>

 

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