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John P. Holdren

John P. Holdren

Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

Member of the Board (on leave), Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

 

 

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AP Photo

Fall 2009

"Energy for Change: Introduction to the Special Issue on Energy & Climate Change"

Journal Article, Innovations, issue 4, volume 4

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

"Without energy, there is no economy. Without climate, there is no environment. Without economy and environment, there is no material well-being, no civil society, no personal or national security. The overriding problem associated with these realities, of course, is that the world has long been getting most of the energy its economies need from fossil fuels whose emissions are imperiling the climate that its environment needs."

 

AP Images

Fall 2007

"Professor John P. Holdren Moderates the Energy & Climate Panel at the 2007 Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting"

Media Feature

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

John P. Holdren, director of the Belfer Center's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, moderated the Energy & Climate panel "Stabilizing the Climate: Pathways to Success" at the Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting in New York on September 27, 2007.

 

January 25, 2008

"Science and Technology for Sustainable Well-Being"

Journal Article, Science, issue 5862, volume 319

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

"I would urge every scientist and engineer with an interest in the intersection of S&T with sustainable well-being...to 'tithe' 10% of your professional time and effort to working in these and other ways to increase the benefits of S&T for the human condition and to decrease the liabilities. If so much as a substantial fraction of the world's scientists and engineers resolved to do this much, the acceleration of progress toward sustainable well-being for all of Earth's inhabitants would surprise us all."

 

AP Images

Fall 2007

"Professor John P. Holdren Moderates the Energy & Climate Panel at the 2007 Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting"

Media Feature

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

John P. Holdren, director of the Belfer Center's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, moderated the Energy & Climate panel "Stabilizing the Climate: Pathways to Success" at the Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting in New York on September 27, 2007.

 

Patrick Cashin MTA Photo

October 28, 2013

"After Sandy, Rebuilding Smarter with S&T"

Op-Ed, OSTP Blog

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

"Increasing America's preparedness for future storms means more than building taller and stronger barriers to stand up against severe weather. A climate-resilient America is one built on a foundation of the best information and innovative ideas and one that incorporates scientific knowledge to understand risks, take preventative steps, improve disaster-response and recovery, and protect our communities."

 

 

January 11, 2013

"Expanding the Climate Change Conversation"

Op-Ed, OSTP Blog

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and Jane Lubchenco

"...[A] committee of independent advisors to the U.S. Government released its first draft of a new National Climate Assessment (NCA)—a 400-page synthesis of scientists' current understanding of climate change and its impacts in the United States. The Global Change Research Act of 1990 calls for an NCA to be produced at least every four years—the last came out in 2009. The draft NCA is a scientific document—not a policy document—and does not make recommendations regarding actions that might be taken in response to climate change. Today is the first time the Government has been presented with this draft and the administration will be one of a number of entities that will begin the process of reviewing it. When completed about a year from now, however—after considerable inputs from the public and expert reviewers—it will represent the most thorough, rigorous, and transparent assessment ever of climate change and its U.S. impacts."

 

 

AP Photo

Fall 2009

"Energy for Change: Introduction to the Special Issue on Energy & Climate Change"

Journal Article, Innovations, issue 4, volume 4

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

"Without energy, there is no economy. Without climate, there is no environment. Without economy and environment, there is no material well-being, no civil society, no personal or national security. The overriding problem associated with these realities, of course, is that the world has long been getting most of the energy its economies need from fossil fuels whose emissions are imperiling the climate that its environment needs."

 

 

May 2009

"Policy for Energy Technology Innovation"

Book Chapter

By Laura Diaz Anadon, Assistant Professor of Public Policy; Associate Director, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program; Co-PI, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

"The United States ought to be the leader of the world in the energy technology innovation that is needed. It has the largest economy, uses the most energy (and within that total the most oil), has made the largest cumulative contribution to the atmospheric buildup of fossil carbon dioxide that is the dominant driver of global climate change, has a large balance of payments stake in competitiveness in the global energy technology market as well as a large stake in the worldwide economic and security benefits of meeting global energy needs in affordable and sustainable ways, and possesses by many measures the most capable scientific and engineering workforce in the world. The actual performance of this country in energy-technology innovation, however, has been falling short by almost every measure...."

 

 

March 14, 2008

"Ending the Energy Stalemate: A Bipartisan Strategy To Meet America’s Energy Challenges"

Presentation

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

John P. Holdren provides the context for and an overview of the recommendations made by the National Commission on Energy Policy its 2004 and 2007 reports to the President and Congress of the United States.

 

 

May 23 - 24, 2007

"Status and Progress of IGCC and Co-Production Technology in the United States"

Presentation

By Ananth Chikkatur, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

Presented at "a Joint Workshop on IGCC & Co-Production and CO2 Capture & Storage" in Beijing, May 23 - 24, 2007.

 

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