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John P. Holdren

John P. Holdren

Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

Member of the Board (on leave), Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

 

 

By Topic

 

Nuclear proliferation (continued)

June 1, 1997

Letter to Presidents Yeltsin and Clinton

Letter

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and Evgeny Velikhov

We respectfully submit the Final Report of the U.S.-Russian Independent Scientific Commission on Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium. We strongly urge that the U.S. and Russian governments, with support and cooperation from the international community, take additional steps - beyond those already underway - to more rapidly reduce the security risks posed by excess weapons plutonium, ensuring that this material will never again be returned to nuclear weapons. Our report recommends specific steps to meet this objective, including the technologies that can be used, a step-by-step plan of action for bringing these technologies into operation as rapidly as practicable, an international cooperative approach to financing the program, and establishment of an international entity to coordinate the necessary financing and implement the effort.

 

 

June 1, 1997

US-Russia Independent Scientific Commission on Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium: Final Report

Report

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and Evgeny Velikhov

 

 

June, 1997

The Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy

Book

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

 

 

1997

Defending the United States Against Weapons of Mass Destruction

Memorandum

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School, Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Ashton B. Carter, Former Co-Director, Preventive Defense Project, Harvard & Stanford Universities, John M. Deutch, International Council Member, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Richard A. Falkenrath, Former Assistant Professor of Public Policy; Former Principal Investigator, Executive Session on Domestic Preparedness; Former Executive Director for Research, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program, Robert Newman, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1995-1996 and Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Unpublished memorandum to the United States Senate

 

January 25, 2008

"Science and Technology for Sustainable Well-Being"

Journal Article, Science, issue 5862, volume 319

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

"I would urge every scientist and engineer with an interest in the intersection of S&T with sustainable well-being...to 'tithe' 10% of your professional time and effort to working in these and other ways to increase the benefits of S&T for the human condition and to decrease the liabilities. If so much as a substantial fraction of the world's scientists and engineers resolved to do this much, the acceleration of progress toward sustainable well-being for all of Earth's inhabitants would surprise us all."

 

 

October 28, 2005

Retrospective: Joseph Rotblat (1908-2005)

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Science, issue 5748, volume 310

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

 

 

July / August 2005

Is There a Role for Nuclear Weapons Today

Journal Article, Arms Control Today, issue 6, volume 35

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

 

 

June 2005

"The Economics of Reprocessing Versus Direct Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel"

Journal Article, Nuclear Technology, volume 150

By Bob van der Zwaan, Former Research Associate, Energy Technology Innovation research group/Project on Managing the Atom Project/Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 2001–2005, John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program, Steve Fetter, Former Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program and Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

The Economics of Reprocessing Versus Direct Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel

 

 

April, 2005

Monitoring Nuclear Weapons and Nuclear-Explosive Materials: An Assessment of Methods and Capabilities

Report

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and Steve Fetter, Former Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

 

 

December 2003

The Economics of Reprocessing vs. Direct Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel

Report

By Bob van der Zwaan, Former Research Associate, Energy Technology Innovation research group/Project on Managing the Atom Project/Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 2001–2005, John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program, Steve Fetter, Former Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program and Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

For decades, there has been an intense debate over the best approach to managing spent fuel from nuclear power reactors, whether it is better to dispose of it directly in geologic repositories, or reprocess it to recover and recycle the plutonium and uranium, disposing only of the wastes from reprocessing and recycling.

 

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