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John P. Holdren

John P. Holdren

Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

Member of the Board (on leave), Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

 

 

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Fall 2009

"Energy for Change: Introduction to the Special Issue on Energy & Climate Change"

Journal Article, Innovations, issue 4, volume 4

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

"Without energy, there is no economy. Without climate, there is no environment. Without economy and environment, there is no material well-being, no civil society, no personal or national security. The overriding problem associated with these realities, of course, is that the world has long been getting most of the energy its economies need from fossil fuels whose emissions are imperiling the climate that its environment needs."

 

 

2006

"Energy-Technology Innovation"

Journal Article, Annual Review of Environment and Resources, volume 31

By Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and Kelly Sims Gallagher, Senior Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

This paper examines the state of understanding of energy-technology innovation and its role in augmenting energy resources, enhancing the quality of energy services, and reducing the economic, environmental, or political costs associated with energy supply and use.

 

 

October 28, 2005

Retrospective: Joseph Rotblat (1908-2005)

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Science, issue 5748, volume 310

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

 

 

2005

"Commentary on Part VI (A New Energy Security Strategy)"

Book Chapter

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

For more than a century, energy and its procurement have been central to the U.S. position as a world power.

 

 

July / August 2005

Is There a Role for Nuclear Weapons Today

Journal Article, Arms Control Today, issue 6, volume 35

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

 

 

June 2005

"The Economics of Reprocessing Versus Direct Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel"

Journal Article, Nuclear Technology, volume 150

By Steve Fetter, Former Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Bob van der Zwaan, Former Research Associate, Energy Technology Innovation research group/Project on Managing the Atom Project/Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 2001–2005 and John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

The Economics of Reprocessing Versus Direct Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel

 

 

April, 2005

Monitoring Nuclear Weapons and Nuclear-Explosive Materials: An Assessment of Methods and Capabilities

Report

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and Steve Fetter, Former Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

 

 

December 2003

The Economics of Reprocessing vs. Direct Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel

Report

By Steve Fetter, Former Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Bob van der Zwaan, Former Research Associate, Energy Technology Innovation research group/Project on Managing the Atom Project/Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 2001–2005 and John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

For decades, there has been an intense debate over the best approach to managing spent fuel from nuclear power reactors, whether it is better to dispose of it directly in geologic repositories, or reprocess it to recover and recycle the plutonium and uranium, disposing only of the wastes from reprocessing and recycling.

 

 

July 2003

The Future of Nuclear Power: An Interdisciplinary MIT Study

Report

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and John M. Deutch, International Council Member, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

From the July 29, 2003 MIT press release: A distinguished team of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard released today what co-chair Dr. John Deutch calls "the most comprehensive, interdisciplinary study ever conducted on the future of nuclear energy." The report maintains that "The nuclear option should be retained precisely because it is an important carbon-free source of power."

 

 

March, 2003

Controlling Nuclear Warheads and Materials: A Report Card and Action Plan

Report

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program, Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Anthony Wier, Former Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom/Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 2002-2007

 

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