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John P. Holdren

John P. Holdren

Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

Member of the Board (on leave), Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

 

 

By Publication Type

 

February, 2003

Letter Report from the Co-Chairs of the Joint Committee on U.S.-Russian Cooperation on Nuclear Non-Proliferation

Annual Report

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

 

 

June, 2001

Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel: A Safe, Flexible, and Cost-Effective Near-Term Approach to Spent Fuel Management

Annual Report

By Allison Macfarlane, Associate, Project on Managing the Atom, John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program, Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Jennifer Weeks, Former Executive Director and Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom/Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 1997-2001

 

June, 1997

The Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy

Book

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

 

May 2009

"Policy for Energy Technology Innovation"

Book Chapter

By Laura Diaz Anadon, Assistant Professor of Public Policy; Associate Director, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program; Co-PI, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

"The United States ought to be the leader of the world in the energy technology innovation that is needed. It has the largest economy, uses the most energy (and within that total the most oil), has made the largest cumulative contribution to the atmospheric buildup of fossil carbon dioxide that is the dominant driver of global climate change, has a large balance of payments stake in competitiveness in the global energy technology market as well as a large stake in the worldwide economic and security benefits of meeting global energy needs in affordable and sustainable ways, and possesses by many measures the most capable scientific and engineering workforce in the world. The actual performance of this country in energy-technology innovation, however, has been falling short by almost every measure...."

 

 

2005

"Commentary on Part VI (A New Energy Security Strategy)"

Book Chapter

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

For more than a century, energy and its procurement have been central to the U.S. position as a world power.

 

 

November 2000

"The Energy-Climate Challenge"

Book Chapter

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

"In short, energy is the most difficult part of the environment problem, and environment is the most difficult part of the energy problem."

 

 

September 2000

Energy, the Environment and Health

Book Chapter

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

About half of the world's households use solid fuels (biomass and coal) for cooking and heating in simple devices that produce large amounts of air pollution.

 

 

June 1999

"Getting to Zero: Is Pursuing a Nuclear-Weapon-Free World Too Difficult? Too Dangerous? Too Distracting?"

Book Chapter

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

An assessment of the potential for and desirability of completely eliminating nuclear weapons.

 

 

July 1, 1998

Reducing the Threat of Nuclear Theft

Book Chapter

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

 

 

November 1997

Chairs, Members, PCAST Panel on Energy R&D, and Staff

Book Chapter

By John P. Holdren, Former Director and Faculty Chair, Science, Technology and Public Policy Program

 

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