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Henry Lee

Henry Lee

Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program

Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Senior Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1350
Fax: (617) 495-1635
Email: henry_lee@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

U.S. energy policy (continued)

April, 1995

Shaping National Responses to Climate Change: A Post Rio Guide

Book

By Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program

 

 

"Designing Domestic Carbon Trading Systems: Key Considerations"

Discussion Paper

By Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program

In the fall of 1998, the US government was divided between those who believed that the nation should agree to substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and those who believed the price tag was too high and the scientific evidence too uncertain.

 

 

"Summary of Symposium on Health Aspects of Exposure to Asbestos in Buildings"

Discussion Paper

By Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program

This needs a short description

 

April 2016

"Increasing Residential Building Energy Efficiency In China: An Evaluation of Policy Instruments"

Discussion Paper

By Xiaoqi Xu, Former Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2013–2014, Laura Diaz Anadon, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program

Various policies targeting at building energy efficiency have been promulgated by the Chinese government in the past decade. However, few studies evaluate if China is on the right path to meet its energy goals through these policies by providing an assessment of their effect in reducing energy consumption in residential buildings or the feasibility of such policies to catalyze these reductions. This paper attempts to fill this gap by systematically quantifying (1) the energy savings catalyzed by existing policy instruments; (2) the additional energy savings that could be realized by strengthening these policies; and (3) the relative advantages of each policy.

 

 

June 2015

"The Future of Low-Carbon Road Transport: What Role for Second-Generation Biofuels?"

Rapporteur's Report

By Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015 and Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program

The promise, prospects, and public policy trade-offs related to second-generation biofuels in road transport were addressed in an executive session convened at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, on April 7 and 8, 2015. The workshop brought together twenty-eight of the world's leading experts from the fields of policy, science, and business for an intensive two-day session. This report is a summary of the main points and issues raised over the two days. It has been reviewed by all the participants. The summary is intended to reflect the breadth of the discussion, rather than to suggest any form of overall consensus among the participants.

 

 

June 18, 2015

"Steps to China's Carbon Peak"

Journal Article, Nature, volume 522

By Zhu Liu, Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Dabo Guan, Scott Moore, Former Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2012–2014, Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Jun Su, Former Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 2001–2002 and Qiang Zhang

China is the world's largest emitter of carbon dioxide, accounting for one-quarter of the global total in 2013. Although the country has successfully lowered the rate of emissions from industry in some cities through improved technology and energy-efficiency measures, rapid economic growth means that more emissions are being added than removed. Without mitigation, China's CO2 emissions will rise by more than 50% in the next 15 years.

 

 

Babcock & Wilcox Photo

December 2010

Tranforming the Energy Economy: Options for Accelerating the Commercialization of Advanced Energy Technologies—Framing Statement

Report

By Laura Diaz Anadon, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Erik Mielke, Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2010–2011, Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy; Professor of Physics, Harvard; Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

"There is broad political consensus that the current energy system in the United States is unable to meet the nation's future energy needs, from the security, environment, and economic perspectives. New energy technologies are required to increase the availability of domestic energy supplies, to reduce the negative environmental impacts of our energy system, to improve the reliability of current energy infrastructure (e.g., smart grid, energy storage), and to increase energy efficiency throughout the economy."

 

June 2015

"The Future of Low-Carbon Road Transport: What Role for Second-Generation Biofuels?"

Rapporteur's Report

By Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015 and Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program

The promise, prospects, and public policy trade-offs related to second-generation biofuels in road transport were addressed in an executive session convened at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, on April 7 and 8, 2015. The workshop brought together twenty-eight of the world's leading experts from the fields of policy, science, and business for an intensive two-day session. This report is a summary of the main points and issues raised over the two days. It has been reviewed by all the participants. The summary is intended to reflect the breadth of the discussion, rather than to suggest any form of overall consensus among the participants.

 

 

June 18, 2015

"Steps to China's Carbon Peak"

Journal Article, Nature, volume 522

By Zhu Liu, Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Dabo Guan, Scott Moore, Former Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2012–2014, Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Jun Su, Former Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 2001–2002 and Qiang Zhang

China is the world's largest emitter of carbon dioxide, accounting for one-quarter of the global total in 2013. Although the country has successfully lowered the rate of emissions from industry in some cities through improved technology and energy-efficiency measures, rapid economic growth means that more emissions are being added than removed. Without mitigation, China's CO2 emissions will rise by more than 50% in the next 15 years.

 

 

Beacon Power Corp. Photo

February 2011

Transforming the Energy Economy: Options for Accelerating the Commercialization of Advanced Energy Technologies

Report

By Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy; Professor of Physics, Harvard; Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Laura Diaz Anadon, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Hanna Breetz, Former Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program (STPP)/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group (ETIP), 2011–2013; Former Fellow, STPP/ETIP, 2010–2011, Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Henry Lee, Director, Environment and Natural Resources Program and Erik Mielke, Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2010–2011

"The focus of the workshop was on the demonstration stage of the technology innovation cycle. Current policies do not adequately address the private sector’s inability to overcome the demonstration "valley of death" for new energy technologies. Investors and financiers fear that the technology and operational risks at this stage of the cycle remain too high to justify the level of investment to build a commercial-sized facility."

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.

Broadmoor Project

The Broadmoor Project: New Orleans Recovery is an effort initiated in 2006 to assist residents of New Orleans' hard-hit Broadmoor neighborhood in designing and implementing a strategy for post-Katrina neighborhood recovery.

Environment - ENRP

The Environment and Natural Resources Program (ENRP) is the center of the Kennedy School of Government's research and outreach on public policy that affects global environmental quality and natural resource management.