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Laura Diaz Anadon

Laura Diaz Anadon

Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program

Contact:
Email: laura_diaz_anadon@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

U.S. nuclear issues (continued)

June 25, 2009

DOE FY 2010 Budget Request and Recovery Act Funding for Energy Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment: Analysis and Recommendations

Report

By Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Kelly Sims Gallagher, Member of the Board and Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

A new analysis of energy research, development, demonstration, and deployment (ERD3) funding in the Obama administration's FY2010 budget and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 finds that the total available for energy research development and demonstration alone and ERD3 in FY2010 would double and increase by two-thirds, respectively, compared to FY2009 (based on certain assumptions). These substantial funding increases—coupled with a range of institutional innovations the administration is implementing and movement toward putting a price on carbon emissions—will help accelerate innovation for a broad range of energy technologies. This report analyzes DOE's budget request for ERD3 and the Recovery Act and makes recommendations for further action by Congress and the administration.

 

August 12, 2016

"Making Technological Innovation Work for Sustainable Development"

Journal Article, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

By Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Gabe Chan, Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2012–2015, Alicia Harley, Kira Matus, Suerie Moon, Sharmila L. Murthy and William C. Clark, Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy, and Human Development; Co-director, Sustainability Science Program; Faculty Chair, ENRP

This article sets forth the authors' perspective on how technological innovation can better advance the goals of sustainable development. The authors seek to help bridge the gap between scholarship and practice by drawing from conceptual research, empirical cases, and real-world experience to highlight practical guidelines for use by practicing scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, and policy advocates.

 

 

Creative Commons

May 24, 2016

"Formulating Expectations for Future Water Availability through Infrastructure Development Decisions in Arid Regions"

Journal Article, Systems Engineering

By Afreen Siddiqi, Visiting Scholar, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Farah Ereiqat and Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program

In this research paper, the authors propose that future human mediated water availability in arid regions may be assessed by considering key projects that have been identified or proposed by regional experts and organizations. Using Multicriteria Decision Methods as a framework to organize a set of decision criteria and their relative salience, the likelihood of selection (and development) of a project can be determined and used to form expectations of future regional water availability. The authors apply this approach in a case study of Jordan.

 

 

June 2016

"Expert Views — and Disagreements — About the Potential of Energy Technology R&D"

Journal Article, Climatic Change, issue 3, volume 136

By Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Erin Baker, Valentina Bosetti and Lara Aleluia Reis

In order to make R&D funding decisions to meet particular goals, such as mitigating climate change or improving energy security, or to estimate the social returns to R&D, policy makers need to combine the information provided in this study on cost reduction potentials with an analysis of the macroeconomic implications of these technological changes. The authors conclude with recommendations for future directions on energy expert elicitations.

 

 

Creative Commons

January 2016

"A Spatiotemporal Exploration of Water Consumption Changes Resulting from the Coal-to-Gas Transition in Pennsylvania"

Paper

By Lauren A. Patterson, Sarah Jordaan, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, April–August 2012; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, February 2011–March 2012 and Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program

During the early stages of Pennsylvania's coal-to-gas transition, extraction and generation of coal and natural gas contributed to a yearly 2.6–8.4% increase in the state's water consumption. Although some areas experienced no change in water consumption, others experienced large decreases or increases. Consumption variations depended on available natural gas resources and pre-existing power-generating infrastructure. This analysis estimates monthly water consumption associated with fuel extraction and power generation within Pennsylvania watersheds between 2009 and 2012. It also provides the first comprehensive representation of changing water consumption patterns associated with the state's coal-to-gas transition at the sub-basin level.

 

 

December 2015

"Making Technological Innovation Work for Sustainable Development"

Paper

By Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Gabe Chan, Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2012–2015, Alicia Harley, Kira Matus, Suerie Moon, Sharmila L. Murthy and William C. Clark, Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy, and Human Development; Co-director, Sustainability Science Program; Faculty Chair, ENRP

Sustainable development requires harnessing technological innovation to improve human well-being in current and future generations. However, poor, marginalized, and unborn populations too often lack the economic or political power to shape innovation processes to meet their needs. Issues arise at all stages of innovation, from invention of a technology through its selection, production, adaptation, adoption, and retirement.

 

 

2015

"Targeted Opportunities to Address the Climate–trade Dilemma in China"

Journal Article, Nature Climate Change

By Zhu Liu, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Steven J Davis, Kuishuang Feng, Klaus Hubacek, Sai Liang, Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Bin Chen, Jingru Liu, Jinyue Yan and Dabo Guan

International trade has become the fastest growing driver of global carbon emissions, with large quantities of emissions embodied in exports from emerging economies. International trade with emerging economies poses a dilemma for climate and trade policy: to the extent emerging markets have comparative advantages in manufacturing, such trade is economically efficient and desirable. However, if carbon-intensive manufacturing in emerging countries such as China entails drastically more CO2 emissions than making the same product elsewhere, then trade increases global CO2 emissions.

 

 

August 2015

Energy Technology Innovation Policy in the Backdrop of the U.S.-China Emissions Agreement

Report

By Christian Binz, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2014–2015, Gabe Chan, Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2012–2015, Claudia Doblinger, Former Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program (STPP)/Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group; 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, STPP/ETIP, 2014–2015, Joern Huenteler, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy (ETIP) research group, 2015–2016; Former Research Fellow, ETIP, 2013–2015, Dongbo Shi, Former Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, 2014–2015, Tian Tang, Former Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2014–2015, Lei Xu, Former Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2014–2015 and Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program

The Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Tsinghua School of Public Policy and Management convened a workshop at Tsinghua University in Beijing on June 18–19, 2015 to build on the momentum created by the U.S.-China joint emissions agreement and the upcoming Paris negotiations. The objective of the Workshop was to discuss the current state of affairs in China, in the United States, and in selected other countries as well as academic research on: (1) the funding and allocation of government investments in R&D, with a particular focus in energy; (2) the impact of policy on private sector innovation in energy; and (3) the management of publicly funded R&D organizations.

 

 

Wikimedia CC 2.0

In Press

"Food Security Amidst Water Scarcity: Insights on Sustainable Food Production from Saudi Arabia"

Journal Article, Sustainable Production and Consumption

By Arani Kajenthira, Former Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, April–June 2013; Former Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, September 2010–March 2013, Afreen Siddiqi, Visiting Scholar, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program and Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program

Water, energy, and food security are of critical concern as rising population growth and rapid urbanization place greater pressure on our natural resources. This study evaluates the growing internationalization of food production in water-scarce countries using the case of Saudi Arabia as a microcosm to illustrate the tradeoffs in resource consumption associated with crop selection and farming practices.

 

 

Wikimedia CC 3.0

In Press

"Four System Boundaries for Carbon Accounts"

Journal Article, Ecological Modelling

By Zhu Liu, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Kuishuang Feng, Klaus Hubacek, Sai Liang, Laura Diaz Anadon, Associate, Environment and Natural Resources Program, Chao Zhang, Former Giorgio Ruffolo Fellow, Sustainability Science Program/Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2012–July 2013 and Dabo Guan

Knowing the carbon emission baseline of a region is a precondition for any mitigation effort, but the baselines are highly dependent on the system boundaries for which they are calculated. On the basis of sectoral energy statistics and a nested provincial and global multi-regional input–output model, the authors calculate and compare four different system boundaries for China's 30 provinces and major cities.

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.