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Steven E. Miller

Steven E. Miller

Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1411
Fax: (617)-495-8963
Email: steven_miller@harvard.edu

 

 

By Publication Type

 

March 1995

The Perils of Anarchy

International Security Reader

By Michael E. Brown, Editorial Board Member and Former Co-Editor, Quarterly Journal: International Security, Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Editor, International Security; Series Editor, Belfer Center Studies in International Security and Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

Current debates about the nature of international politics have centered on the clash between supporters and critics of realism. The Perils of Anarchy brings together a number of recent essays written in the realist tradition. It includes realist interpretations of the collapse of the Cold War order and of the emerging order that has replaced it, the sources of alignment and aggression, and the causes of peace. A final section provides a counterpoint by raising criticisms of and alternatives to the realist approach.

 

 

March 1995

Global Dangers: Changing Dimensions of International Security

International Security Reader

By Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Editor, International Security; Series Editor, Belfer Center Studies in International Security and Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

The essays collected in Global Dangers provide both conceptual analysis and empirical assessment of the environment, migration, and nationalism as sources of conflict.

 

 

July 1993

The Cold War and After: Prospects for Peace

International Security Reader

By Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Editor, International Security; Series Editor, Belfer Center Studies in International Security and Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

The Cold War and After presents a collection of well-reasoned arguments selected from the journal International Security on the causes of the Cold War and the effect of its aftermath on the peaceful coexistence of European states. This new edition includes all of the material from the first edition, plus four new articles.

 

 

October 1992

America's Strategy in a Changing World

International Security Reader

By Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Editor, International Security; Series Editor, Belfer Center Studies in International Security and Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

At a time when events are overtaking many publications, these articles selected from International Security provide up-to-date and comprehensive analyses of American national security strategy in the post–Cold War world.

Addressing future U.S. relations with its Cold War allies as well as with its former foes, contributions take up such major issues as overall strategic options, security in the new Europe, relations with the former Soviet Union, U.S.-Japan relations, and threats in the Third World, particularly proliferation.

 

 

September 1990

Nuclear Diplomacy and Crisis Management

International Security Reader

By Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Editor, International Security; Series Editor, Belfer Center Studies in International Security, Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security

These essays from the journal International Security examine the effects of the nuclear revolution on the international system and the role nuclear threats have played in international crises.

 

 

August 1989

Soviet Military Policy

International Security Reader

By Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Editor, International Security; Series Editor, Belfer Center Studies in International Security, Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security

Soviet military policy has been one of the most important and perplexing issues confronting the United States since 1945. Mikhail Gorbachev's foreign policy innovations have focused renewed attention on these vital questions.

 

 

August 1989

Conventional Forces and American Defense Policy

International Security Reader

By Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Editor, International Security; Series Editor, Belfer Center Studies in International Security and Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

These fourteen essays analyze several major areas of American conventional defense: the new administration's defense policy the state of the NATO Warsaw Pact conventional balance, the effectiveness of NATO's conventional strategy and problems associated with projecting military power in the Third World.

 

AP Photo

January/February 2012

"Nuclear Weapons 2011: Momentum Slows, Reality Returns"

Journal Article, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, issue 1, volume 68

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

In the Doomsday Clock issue of the Bulletin, the author takes a look at five events that unfolded in 2011 and that seem certain to cast a powerful shadow in months and years to come. No new breakthroughs occurred, the author writes, adding that 2012 could be a much more difficult year.

 

 

September 2010

"A Deeply Fractured Regime: Assessing the 2010 NPT Review Conference"

Journal Article, The International Spectator Italian Journal of International Affairs, issue 3, volume 45

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

The United States had mixed results at the 2010 NPT Review Conference. On the one hand, it avoided the isolation and criticism directed at Washington in connection with the failed 2005 Review Conference, in large measure because the Obama administration took more congenial positions on a number of nuclear issues. Its cooperation also facilitated the successful achievement of a consensus final document. On the other hand, there was wide resistance to a number of measures for strengthening the NPT system favoured or promoted by the United States, resistance that reveals deep and worrying divisions within the regime.

 

 

AP Photo

December 2010

"The Hegemonic Illusion? Traditional Strategic Studies In Context"

Journal Article, Security Dialogue, issue 6, volume 41

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

"...[T]he history of the field would unfold quite differently if the development of multiple schools of thought were regarded as a natural evolution involving a healthy and desirable intellectual division of labor rather than an ongoing mortal struggle for the soul of security."

 

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