Belfer Center Home > Experts > Steven E. Miller

« Back to Steven E. Miller

Steven E. Miller

Steven E. Miller

Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1411
Fax: (617)-495-8963
Email: steven_miller@harvard.edu

 

 

By Publication Type

 

Spring 2012

Belfer Center Founder Paul Doty: Groundbreaker and Peacemaker, Colleague and Mentor

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

Paul Doty founded what is now the Belfer Center in 1974 and was an active participant in Center activities until a few weeks before his death on December 5, 2011. He was 91. Steven Miller, a member of Dotyís early staff and current director of the Centerís International Security Program and editor-in-chief of International Security journal, remembers his colleague and friend.

 

 

Spring 2007

"Centerís Efforts Impact Nuclear Policy"

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

The abortive coup attempt against Mikhail Gorbachev in Moscow in August 1991 raised in a stark and alarming way the question of who was controlling the Soviet arsenal at a moment of extraordinary political instability. The subsequent disintegration of the Soviet Union raised the equally consequential question of who would inherit the Soviet nuclear arsenal. The ensuing and ongoing political instability and economic travails in Russia raised the question of the safety and security of the Russian nuclear arsenal and nuclear empire. In view of the fact that these weapons and associated nuclear materials constitute the largest potential threat to the United States and its allies, and given the potential of Russian nuclear weapons and weapons-usable materials to fuel terrorism and nuclear proliferation, this is one of the most significant security issues of the post-Cold War era. Work on the safety and security of Russian nuclear holdings soon led to concern about the adequacy of custodial arrangements for nuclear weapons and nuclear materials on a global scale. Meanwhile, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 highlighted the danger that a terrorist group might obtain nuclear weapons and inflict an even more terrible attack.

 

 

Fall 2004

"The View from Tehran"

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

"Iran is a normal country. We are not evil and we do not understand why the U.S. government includes us in the axis of evil." This was a common refrain encountered in Tehran in May 2004 by a visiting group of Westerners, including myself, organized by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). The visit included a workshop on Iran's relations with the West held in collaboration with Iran's Institute for Political and International Studies. The time in Tehran-a huge, traffic-choked city-also included sessions at the Faculty of Law and Political Science of the University of Tehran and at Tehran's Center for Strategic Studies, as well as meetings with senior officials from the Foreign Ministry and the Expediency Council.

 

December 2002

"War with Iraq: Costs, Consequences, and Alternatives"

Occasional Paper

By Carl Kaysen, Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom, William D. Nordhaus and John D. Steinbruner, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1973-1977

A December 2002 report, published under the auspices of the Academy’s Committee on International Security Studies (CISS), finds that the political, military, and economic consequences of war with Iraq could be extremely costly to the United States. William D. Nordhaus (Yale University) estimates the economic costs of war with Iraq in scenarios that are both favorable and unfavorable to the United States. Steven E. Miller (Harvard University) considers a number of potentially disastrous military and strategic outcomes of war for the United States that have received scant public attention. Carl Kaysen (MIT), John D. Steinbruner (University of Maryland),and Martin B. Malin (American Academy) examine the broader national security strategy behind the move toward a preventive war against Iraq.

 

 

September, 2000

A Comprehensive Approach to Nuclear Arms Control

Occasional Paper

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

 

 

January 1, 1999

"Fulfilling the Promise: Building an Enduring Security Relationship Between Ukraine and NATO"

Occasional Paper, volume 1

By Ashton B. Carter, Former Co-Director, Preventive Defense Project, Harvard & Stanford Universities, Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Dr. Elizabeth D. Sherwood-Randall, Former Founding Senior Advisor, Preventive Defense Project

Report on April 1998 PDP-sponsored workshop to discuss the future of the relationship between Ukraine and NATO

 

September 11, 2006

"Iran and Nuclear Diplomacy after the Ultimatum"

Op-Ed, Nezavisimaya Gazeta

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

"Set against the probable weakness of the threatened sanctions is the fact that in Iran’s domestic politics, abandonment of the challenged aspects of the nuclear program would be seen as an intolerable and unforgivable capitulation to Washington’s pressure and manipulations."

 

 

May 9, 2003

Testing The Bush Doctrine

Op-Ed, Harvard Crimson

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

 

April 2012

"Nuclear Collisions: Discord, Reform & the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime"

Paper

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Wael Al-Assad, Jayantha Dhanapala, C. Raja Mohan and Ta Minh Tuan

Nearly all of the 190 signatories to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) agree that the forty-two-year-old treaty is fragile and in need of fundamental reform. But gaining consensus on how to fix the NPT will require reconciling the sharply differing views of nuclear weapon states and non-nuclear weapon states. Strengthening the international rules is increasingly important as dozens of countries, including some with unstable political environments, explore nuclear energy. The result is an ever-increasing distribution of this technology. In this paper, Steven E. Miller outlines the main points of contention within the NPT regime and identifies the issues that have made reform so difficult.

 

 

December, 2002

Gambling on War: Force, Order, and the Implications of Attacking Iraq

Paper

By Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

 

SUBSCRIBE

Receive email updates on the most pressing topics in science and int'l affairs.

Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Russian President†Mikhail Gorbachev.