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Ambuj D. Sagar

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Ambuj D. Sagar

Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

 

Experience

Ambuj Sagar is the Vipula and Mahesh Chaturvedi Professor of Policy Studies at the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi. Prof. Sagar's interests broadly lie in science and technology policy, environmental policy, and development policy, with a particular focus on the interactions between technology and society. While his current research focuses mainly on energy innovation and climate policy, he also studies, more broadly, various facets of technology innovation, environmental policy politics and processes, and engineering education and research. His recent papers have dealt with energy innovation policy and strategies (in areas such as biofuels, coal power, and automobiles), climate change policy, and capacity development for the environment. He currently is advising or consulting with various agencies of the Indian Government and with several multilateral and bilateral organizations; while in the United States, he worked with a range of private and public-sector organizations (including as a staff researcher for a major study on energy R&D for the White House). He currently is a member of the Indian Government's Expert Committee on Low-Carbon Strategies for Inclusive Growth, the U.S.-India Track-II Dialogue on Climate Change, as well as other advisory groups in the Indian Government.

 

 

By Date

 

2014

2014

"Technology Innovation and Energy"

Journal Article, Reference Module in Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences

By Kavita Surana, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program, Ananth Chikkatur, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

Energy technology innovation is the key to driving the technological changes that are necessary to meet the challenge of mitigating energy-related greenhouse gas emissions to avoid 'dangerous climate change.' Success in innovation requires the enhancement of public investment in the innovation process, the creation of markets for low-carbon technologies through stronger climate policies, and a continued focus on energy access and equity.

 

2009

AP Photo

September 2009

"Institutions for Energy Innovation: A Transformational Challenge"

Paper

By Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Professor of Technology and Public Policy; Professor of Physics, Harvard; Director, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program; Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Laura Diaz Anadon, Assistant Professor of Public Policy; Associate Director, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program; Co-PI, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

"The technology-led transformation of the U.S. energy system that the administration is seeking is unlikely to succeed without a transformation of energy innovation institutions and of the way in which policymakers think about their design, according to scholars with the Belfer Center's Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group. They set out principles for a much-needed conversation among analysts, managers, scientists, and policymakers on how to enhance the effectiveness of these institutions."

 

 

AP Photo

Fall 2009

"Transforming Energy Innovation"

Journal Article, Issues in Science and Technology

By Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Professor of Technology and Public Policy; Professor of Physics, Harvard; Director, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program; Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Laura Diaz Anadon, Assistant Professor of Public Policy; Associate Director, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program; Co-PI, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

"The United States must change the way it produces and uses energy by shifting away from its dependence on imported oil and coal-fired electricity and by increasing the efficiency with which energy is extracted, captured, converted, and used if it is to meet the urgent challenges facing the energy system, of which climate change and energy security are the most pressing. This will require the improvement of current technologies and the development of new transformative ones, particularly if the transition to a new energy system is going to be timely and cost-effective."

 

 

AP Photo

In Press

"Sustainable Development of the Indian Coal Sector"

Journal Article, Energy

By Ananth Chikkatur, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program and T. L. Sankar

Increased availability of energy, especially electricity, is important for India to help advance economic and human development. Coal, which currently accounts for more than 50% of total primary commercial energy supply in the country and for about 70% of total electricity generation, is likely to remain a key energy source for India for at least the next 30–40 years. Thus, sustainable development of the Indian coal sector is necessary to ensure the ability to sustain the increased production of coal in the country and to do so in an environmentally and socially sustainable manner.

 

 

AP Photo

February 2009

"Carbon Mitigation in the Indian Coal-Power Sector: Options and Recommendations"

Journal Article, Energy Procedia, issue 1, volume 1

By Ananth Chikkatur, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

Given coal's large contribution to India's emissions, it is important to explore options for reducing emissions from the Indian coal power sector. Even as India awaits stronger action by industrialized countries, several no-regrets options can still be instituted to position the Indian coal-power sector appropriately for an eventual deeper carbon mitigation strategy: (a) improve efficiency of generation, transmission and distribution, and end-use systems; (b) aggressively deploy higher-efficiency coal combustion technologies; (c) develop a strategic plan for technology innovation; (d) improve environmental regulations to keep open economic carbon capture options; and (e) invest in detailed geological assessment of carbon storage sites.

 

 

January 2009

Positioning the Indian Coal-Power Sector for Carbon Mitigation: Key Policy Options

Paper

By Ananth Chikkatur, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

The domestic and international steps outlined in this paper could greatly advance the development and implementation of a GHG-mitigation strategy in the Indian coal-power sector, while allowing the sector to contribute suitably to the country’s energy needs. The key to success will be adopting a deliberate approach, with short- and long-term perspectives in mind, that allows for the development of an integrated energy and climate policy.

 

2008

Carsten Karl

Winter 2007/08

"Cleaner Power in India: Towards a Clean-Coal-Technology Roadmap"

Discussion Paper

By Ananth Chikkatur, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

Investigating the role of coal in India's energy sector, Chikkatur and Sagar emphasize the need for a technology roadmapping process. They highlight the interlinkages between technology innovation and public policy and provide an analytical framework to help delineate the kinds of questions that scholars and practitioners need to ask in addressing India's coal sector.

 

2007

World Bank

December 2007

"Towards Better Technology Policies for the Indian Coal-Power Sector"

Journal Article, Energy for Sustainable Development, issue 4, volume XI

By Ananth Chikkatur, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

This paper assesses the suitability of current and emerging advanced power generation technologies for the Indian context and presents some technology policy implications of this assessment and analysis to help the Indian coal-power sector meet the country’s energy needs in a sustainable manner.

 

 

December 2007

"Past as Prologue: An Innovation-Diffusion Approach to Additionality"

Journal Article, Climate Policy, issue 3, volume 7

By Ajay Mathur, Ananth Chikkatur, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

The authors propose a simple test for additionality that draws on the framework of the diffusion of innovations, especially the risk-profile of adopters of new technologies or innovations.

 

 

November 20, 2007

"Developing Better Policies for the Sustainable Development of the Indian Coal Sector"

Conference Paper

By Ananth Chikkatur, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group and Ambuj D. Sagar, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program

Coal accounts for about 70% of total electricity generation in India and is likely to remain a key energy source for at least the next 30-40 years. An increase in India's use of coal resources for its energy supply must occur through environmentally and socially sustainable development of this sector.

 

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