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Eric Kaufmann

Former Research Fellow, Initiative on Religion in International Affairs/International Security Program

Contact:
Website: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/polsoc/staff/academic/eric-kaufmann

 

Experience

Former Research Fellow, Initiative on Religion in International Affairs/International Security Program, 2008–2009

Current Affiliation: Reader in Politics and Sociology, Birbeck, University of London, London, United Kingdom

 

 

By Date

 

2009

AP Photo

June 20, 2009

"The Return of Economic Nationalism"

Op-Ed, The Providence Journal

By Eric Kaufmann, Former Research Fellow, Initiative on Religion in International Affairs/International Security Program

"...[E]conomic nationalists sacrifice material consumption for the national pride that comes with being a creditor nation that owns foreign assets. On this logic, the U.S. trade imbalance cannot be rectified by the marketplace alone....This sticks in the throat of those who prize national self-sufficiency and the moral fiber that comes from saving more than one spends....Traces of economic nationalism survive in America. It is no accident that the most successful U.S. vehicles are trucks, powerful symbols of rural and working-class masculine patriotism. That GM and Chrysler are being bailed out is partly because their products have been immortalized in song and film as national icons."

 

 

AP Photo

June 2009

"The Changing Face of Israel"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Foreign Policy

By Richard Cincotta and Eric Kaufmann, Former Research Fellow, Initiative on Religion in International Affairs/International Security Program

"...Ultra-Orthodox rabbis control access to marriage, conversion, and burial, effectively determining the status of non-haredi private lives across the varied Jewish community. In addition, ultra-Orthodox activists flex their political muscle by censoring advertising and movies, organizing consumer boycotts, mounting mass demonstrations, and harassing secular Jews who violate the Sabbath. Once peace-process-disinterested members of various coalition governments, ultra-Orthodox politicians now rank among the most hawkish in the Knesset, defending haredi settlements on the West Bank and in East Jerusalem. Although less politically cohesive, Israeli Arab voters favor the flip side of the political spectrum, which makes moderate Israelis wonder how their democracy might function should these two groups grow to dominate the electorate."

 

 

Belfer Center

February 13, 2009

Demographic Projections Predict Fundamentalist Populations Surpassing Secular Counterparts

News

By Beth Maclin, Former Communications Assistant, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Eric Kaufmann, Former Research Fellow, Initiative on Religion in International Affairs/International Security Program

According to demographic projections, Jewish, Muslim, and Christian fundamentalists will gain significant ground against their liberal and secular counterparts by 2050, even surpassing them in some cases, Belfer Center Fellow Eric Kaufmann said at last week’s International Security Program (ISP) brownbag presentation.

 

 

Photo by Jon Chase

February 2009

"The Meaning of Huntington"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Prospect, issue 155

By Eric Kaufmann, Former Research Fellow, Initiative on Religion in International Affairs/International Security Program

"Both Wasp and Episcopalian, he spent nearly half a century at Harvard and is descended from several generations of Harvard men. But his nationalism was political, not ethnic, valuing institutions like the military and the constitution rather than a timeless landscape or heroic ancestors. In The Promise of Disharmony (1981), he writes of American identity as an idea. America lacked class conflict, so had no need for the mystical folk nationalism of Europe. Wasps and immigrants alike, he argued, were eager to throw off their past and forge a liberal nation. Not a word did he write romanticising puritans or pioneers."

 

2008

AP Photo

2008

"Human Development and the Demography of Secularisation in Global Perspective"

Journal Article, Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion, article 1, issue 4, volume 2008

By Eric Kaufmann, Former Research Fellow, Initiative on Religion in International Affairs/International Security Program

Initiative on Religion in International Affairs Fellow Eric Kaufmann argues in the Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion that "religious belief becomes deregulated and increasingly varied in modern societies as religiosity takes on a self-conscious, rather than taken-for-granted, character. The demographic advantage that religious populations have suggests that the future of secularization, far from confirming a secular teleology, remains indeterminate."

 

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