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Melissa Willard-Foster

Melissa Willard-Foster

Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2008–2012

 

Experience

Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2008–2012

Current Affiliation: Assistant Professor of Political Science, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont

 

 

By Date

2009

Belfer Center

Summer 2009

"Q&A with Melissa Willard-Foster"

Q&A

By Beth Maclin, Former Communications Assistant, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Melissa Willard-Foster, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2008–2012

Melissa Willard-Foster, a research fellow with the International Security Program, discusses the historical context of foreign intervention and forced regime change.

 

 

Winter 2009-10

"Featured Fellows - Focus on Research"

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Sharon Wilke, Associate Director of Communications, Melissa Willard-Foster, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2008–2012 and Vipin Narang, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2008–2010

Melissa Willard-Foster discusses key components to a lasting peace agreement and Vipin Narang explains Taliban threat to Pakistan nuclear weapons. Willard-Foster is a research fellow with the Belfer Center's International Security Program (ISP) and Narang is a research fellow with the ISP and Project on Managing the Atom.

 

 

AP Photo

Summer 2009

"Planning the Peace and Enforcing the Surrender: Deterrence in the Allied Occupations of Germany and Japan"

Journal Article, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, issue 1, volume 40

By Melissa Willard-Foster, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2008–2012

Much is known about the efforts of the United States to democratize, reconstruct, and deliver humanitarian aid to Germany and Japan after their defeat in WorldWar II. Much less is known about the willingness of the United States to use coercive tactics to deter and counter resistance to its military occupation of the two countries. Many of the scholars and politicians who consider the occupations of Germany and Japan to be models for success, largely because of their peaceful outcomes, often overlook the initial period of occupation, in which latent violence figured prominently. An understanding of this early period, however, is crucial to assessing the determinants of peace.

 

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