Belfer Center Home > People > Thomas F. Rutherford

« Back to list of experts

 

Thomas F. Rutherford

 

 

By Date

 

2015

September 2015

"The Role of Border Carbon Adjustment in Unilateral Climate Policy: Insights from a Model-Comparison Study—Summary"

Policy Brief

By Christoph Böhringer, Edward J. Balistreri and Thomas F. Rutherford

In the absence of an effective global agreement to reduce carbon emissions, some industrialized countries have taken unilateral action to reduce emissions. However, unilateral carbon policy can lead to leakage of carbon emissions and precludes abating emissions where such abatement would be least expensive (possibly in other countries). Border carbon adjustment (BCA) is one policy option to mitigate these two disadvantages of unilateral action, but the effectiveness of these measures remains unclear. Comparing the results of simulated carbon policy and BCA in multiple computable general equilibrium (CGE) models of the global economy offers several estimates of the effectiveness of BCA.

 

2012

October 2012

"The Role of Border Carbon Adjustment in Unilateral Climate Policy: Insights from a Model-Comparison Study"

Discussion Paper

By Christoph Böhringer, Edward J. Balistreri and Thomas F. Rutherford

A new Harvard-Project Discussion Paper examines the relationships between domestic climate policy and trade. The study compares the output of a range of economic models, using the methodology of the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF).

 

2008

September 2008

"Revised Emissions Growth Projections for China: Why Post-Kyoto Climate Policy Must Look East"

Discussion Paper

By Geoffrey J. Blanford, Richard G. Richels and Thomas F. Rutherford

Recent growth in carbon dioxide emissions from China's energy sector has exceeded expectations. In a major US government study of future emissions released in 2007, participating models appear to have substantially underestimated the near-term rate of increase in China's emissions. We present a recalibration of one of those models to be consistent with both current observations and historical development patterns. The implications of the new specification for the feasibility of commonly discussed stabilization targets, particularly when considering incomplete global participation, are profound. Unless China's emissions begin to depart soon from their (newly projected) business-as-usual path, stringent stabilization goals may be unattainable. The current round of global policy negotiations must engage China and other developing countries, not to the exclusion of emissions reductions in the developed world and possibly with the help of significant financial incentives, if such goals are to be achieved. It is in all nations' interests to work cooperatively to limit our interference with the global climate.

 

 

September 2008

"Revised Emissions Growth Projections for China: Why Post-Kyoto Climate Policy Must Look East—Summary"

Policy Brief

By Geoffrey J. Blanford, Richard G. Richels and Thomas F. Rutherford

This paper presents updated global emissions projections after taking into account recent trends in China. The results suggest that even the most up-to-date international forecasts may still underestimate potential emissions growth, especially among developing countries.

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.