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Simon Saradzhyan

Simon Saradzhyan

Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: 617-496-8228
Fax: 617-496-0606
Email: simon_saradzhyan@hks.harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2013 (continued)

September 30, 2013

"Transcending Mutual Deterrence in the U.S.-Russian Relationship"

Paper

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Kuznetsov Valentin, Yuri Morozov, Gary Samore, Executive Director for Research, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Viktor I. Yesin and Pavel S. Zolotarev

Even as this paper was being written and edited, U.S.-Russian relations have warmed and chilled. Today, as we are about to go to press, marks a particularly chilly period in recent history, with the cancellation of a planned Moscow Summit in September 2013. To some, this cold spell might signal an inapt moment to consider issues related to transcending mutual deterrence. Such a view would overlook the aims of the paper, which attempts to assess the central and enduring interests of the United States and Russia, the extent to which they coincide or conflict, and whether or not in light of these interests mutual deterrence should remain a fundamental feature of the relationship.

 

 

September 26, 2013

View From the Global Tank: Georgia’s NATO Wish is Understandable, but Difficult to Grant

Op-Ed, RIA Novosti

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Georgia’s outgoing President Mikheil Saakashvili and Prime Minister Bidzina Ivanishvili seem to be at each other’s throats most of the time. But, when it comes to campaigning for Georgia’s membership of NATO, these two high-powered political enemies band together to serenade the Alliance’s visiting officials.

 

 

September 5, 2013

Put Armenia's Choice of Economic Cooperation to Vote

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

It is unfortunate that decisions of such tremendous importance for the Armenian nation's future, as whether this former Soviet republic should apply for membership in the Customs Union (CU), are prepared and made without asking the Armenian public's opinion.

 

 

August 8, 2013

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter: June-July 2013

Newsletter

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter is a forum for discussing nuclear terrorism and actions to contribute to improved joint US-Russian assessment of the threat of nuclear terrorism. Available in both English and Russian.

 

 

(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

August 1, 2013

"View From the Global Tank: Snowden Has Left the Building: A Gift to US-Russian Relations"

Op-Ed, RIA Novosti

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"So Snowden has left the building. The NSA leaker’s departure from Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport, for an undisclosed location in Russia, on Thursday is turning into a real blessing for the US-Russian relationship," writes Simon Saradzhyan. "It may sound perverse, but both Barack Obama, and, to a lesser extent, Vladimir Putin, have good cause to thank the man whom the US government has fruitlessly asked Russia to extradite and whom the Russian government has just granted temporary asylum."

 

 

July 29, 2013

"How U.S., Russia Can Agree on Missile Defense"

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Kevin Ryan, Director, Defense and Intelligence Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"Relations between the United States and Russia today remind one of the report from the well digger, 'We hit bottom and have started to dig.' Whether it’s over issues like leaker Eric Snowden or Syria and Iran, the US and Russia seem to end up on opposite sides of most major problems," write Kevin Ryan and Simon Saradzhyan. But that trend could soon reverse – at least regarding one contentious subject – missile defense.

 

 

July 26, 2013

"Lee Kuan Yew's Lessons for Armenia"

Op-Ed, 21st CENTURY Journal

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Monica Harutyunyan

Simon Saradzhyan and Monica Harutyunyan discuss the applicability of Lee Kuan Yew's strategies for transforming Singapore to the case of Armenia, a state sharing many characteristics with pre-transformation Singapore.

 

 

June 5, 2013

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter: April-May 2013

Newsletter

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter is a forum for discussing nuclear terrorism and actions to contribute to improved joint US-Russian assessment of the threat of nuclear terrorism. Available in both English and Russian.

 

 

May 2, 2013

"Are Chechen Immigrants a 'Threat'?"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

“There are still many questions left unanswered as America seeks to understand how the Tsarnaev brothers could have inflicted harm on the innocent people of the country that has granted them shelter, food and education.But there is one question that should not be asked at all, and that is whether the horrendous attacks in Boston should prompt the United States and other countries to consider immigrants a security threat just because they belong to a certain ethnic group.”

 

 

April 30, 2013

"Boston Bombing Puts Spotlight on Security Services' Failure to Cooperate"

Op-Ed, RIA Novosti

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"Was the bombing of the Boston marathon the result of an intelligence failure? There seems to be no clear answer to that question yet. But it does seem to me that had there been a greater degree of trust between the US and Russian secret services, they would have been more willing to share information and act on each other’s warnings, preventing Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev from allegedly bombing the Boston marathon's finish line on April 15."

 

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