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Simon Saradzhyan

Simon Saradzhyan

Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: 617-496-8228
Fax: 617-496-0606
Email: simon_saradzhyan@hks.harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2012 (continued)

June 6, 2012

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter: April-May 2012

Newsletter

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter is a forum for discussing nuclear terrorism and actions to contribute to improved joint US-Russian assessment of the threat of nuclear terrorism. Available in both English and Russian.

 

 

AP Photo/RIA-Novosti, Dmitry Astakhov, Presidential Press Service

April 26, 2012

"Global Insider: Russia-China Military Ties Growing Despite Friction"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, World Politics Review

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Russia and China launched their first joint naval exercises in the Yellow Sea on Monday. In an email interview, Simon Saradzhyan, a research fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center, discussed military cooperation between Russia and China.

 

 

April 12, 2012

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter: February-March 2012

Newsletter

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter is a forum for discussing nuclear terrorism and actions to contribute to improved joint US-Russian assessment of the threat of nuclear terrorism. Available in both English and Russian.

 

 

Presidential Press and Information Office of Russia

April 5, 2012

"Dealing With the Outside World"

Op-Ed, Russia Profile.org

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Nabi Abdullaev

Simon Saradzhyan writes that the past parliamentary and presidential elections have demonstrated that Putin’s domestic power base is shrinking, especially in large cities where many voters question the results of the polls and the legitimacy of Putin’s return to the Kremlin. To shore up support at home, Saradzhyan believes, "Putin could be expected to project himself as a more fervent guardian of Russia’s interests and its allies vis-à-vis the West than Medvedev while making sure his rethoric does not cross any lines that may cause substantial damage to the benefits that Russia derives from improved relations with both the United States and the EU achieved by his predecessor."

 

 

AP Photo

April 2012

"The Dynamics of Russia’s Response to the Piracy Threat"

Journal Article, NATO Science for Peace and Security Studies, issue E: Human and Societal Dynamics, volume 95

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Russia’s Maritime Doctrine describes “maritime shipments” as being of “vital importance” to the country. Maritime shipments have accounted for 60 percent of Russia’s foreign trade shipments in the recent years. However, vessels bearing the Russian flag account only for 4 percent of Russia’s foreign trade shipments. And the Russian fishing fleet remains relatively near to Russia’s shores, not venturing into the Indian and South Pacific Oceans.

 

 

AP Photo

March 9, 2012

"Putin Redux"

Op-Ed, International Relations and Security Network

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Nabi Abdullaev

Despite protests over alleged vote-rigging, Vladimir Putin is firmly on track to reclaim the Russian presidency in May. But while Putin is poised to return to the office he vacated in 2008, the country he plans to govern is no longer the same.

 

 

AP Photo

March 5, 2012

"Putin election victory doesn't pave an easy path through his third presidential term"

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Nabi Abdullaev

There was little doubt that Vladimir Putin would be elected president of Russia on Sunday and return to the Kremlin for a third term. The Central Elections Committee announced on Monday that Mr. Putin won more than 60 percent of the vote and avoided a second round.  But there is also little doubt that the legitimacy of his presidency will be contested during his third term, given the scale of recent protests against his return and strong criticism of the Sunday vote, which some of the opposition leaders and independent observers condemned as unfair and fraudulent.

 

 

AP Photo/Sedrak Mkrtchyan, PanARMENIAN

March 2012

"Armenia and China—Case for a Special Partnership"

Journal Article, Noravank Foundation, 21st Century Journal

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

This article by Simon Saradzhyan takes stock of the Armenian-Chinese relations to discern whether Yerevan has been effective in its response to the ongoing rise of the Middle Kingdom as the two countries prepare to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations this April.

 

 

AP Photo

February 17, 2012

"Putin, the protest movement and political change in Russia"

Journal Article, EU Institute for Security Studies

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Nabi Abdullaev

Few leaders undertake major reforms in either domestic or foreign policy late in their rule, and Vladimir Putin – who seeks to return to the Kremlin this spring for at least six years – hardly wants to be an exception. However, should the disparate groups behind the recent unprecedented protests in Russia develop into an organised movement leading to a sustained increase in public pressure on the Kremlin, then Putin may end up pursuing far more extensive domestic political and economic reforms than he would wish.

 

 

AP Photo

February 12, 2012

"Creating a Culture of Giving"

Op-Ed, Moscow Times

By Simon Saradzhyan, Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

It is a truism that rapid accumulation of wealth by a privileged minority is bound to generate lasting resentment by the majority. It is the latter that presidential candidate Vladimir Putin decided to use as a campaign issue when he announced last week that Russia's business tycoons should pay a fee to win public acceptance of privatization deals they benefited from in the 1990s.

Read more:http://www.themoscowtimes.com/opinion/article/creating-a-culture-of-giving/452896.html#ixzz1mHIcXpxf
The Moscow Times

 

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