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Graham Allison

Graham Allison

Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Member of the Board

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 496-6099
Fax: (617) 495-1905
Email: graham_allison@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2007 (continued)

March 2, 2007

Lessons from JFK on Power, Diplomacy

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

THE USS JOHN F. KENNEDY docked in Boston yesterday for a final farewell before decommissioning. While in service, the aircraft carrier was frequently stationed in the Mediterranean, projecting American power in the tumultuous Middle East. The retirement of the warship calls forth memories of the man for whom the vessel was aptly named and his conception of the role of military might in US strategy abroad.

 

 

January 17, 2007

Will Iraq's Army Show Up?

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

PRESIDENT BUSH is sending an additional 21,000 American troops to match a promised 8,000 Iraqi soldiers to win the decisive battle of Baghdad. When one in every 1,000 inhabitants of a nation's capital city is being killed every other month, there is no question that the country is failing. The question is what chance the president's prescription has of success.

 

2006

December 31, 2006

Buffett's Gamble Tips the Odds Toward Nuclear Nonproliferation

Op-Ed, Omaha World-Herald

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy famously predicted that "by 1970, there may be 10 nuclear powers instead of four and, by 1975, 15 or 20." Today, there are just 8. Why?

 

 

October 27, 2006

Deterring Kim Jong-Il

Op-Ed, The Washington Post

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

In an interview aired last week, George Stephanopoulos put the question to President Bush: What would he do if "North Korea sold nukes to Iran or al-Qaeda?" Bush replied, "They'd be held to account."

 

 

October 26, 2006

Cardinal Challenge: The World Must Take Seriously North Korea's Nuclear Provocation

Op-Ed, Richmond Times-Dispatch

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

As Henry Kissinger has noted, a cardinal challenge for statesmen is to recognize "a change in the international environment so likely to undermine national security that it must be resisted no matter what form the threat takes or how ostensibly legitimate it appears." North Korea's acquisition of nuclear weapons constitutes just such a change. American, Chinese, and other international leaders clearly failed to prevent this transformation. As a result, we now live in a much more dangerous world.

 

 

September 1, 2006

Flight of Fancy

Book Chapter

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Confronting the Spector of Nuclear TerrorismThe Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

 

 

September 2006

Preface: Confronting the Spector of Nuclear Terrorism

Book Chapter

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Confronting the Spector of Nuclear Terrorism.  The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, September 2006.

 

 

September/October 2006

The Ongoing Failure of Imagination

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Prior to 9/11, most Americans found the idea that international terrorists could mount an attack on their homeland and kill thousands of innocent citizens not just unlikely, but inconceivable. Psychologically, Americans imagined that they lived in a security bubble. Terrorist attacks, including those on U.S. embassies in Tanzania and Kenya, occurred elsewhere. These beliefs were reinforced by the conventional wisdom among terrorism experts, who argued that terrorists sought not mass casualties but rather mass sympathy through limited attacks that called attention to their cause.

 

 

September 2006

Confronting the Spector of Nuclear Terrorism

Book

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Most world leaders agree that nuclear terrorism represents the gravest international security challenge today. Many scholars and practitioners, however, argue that the United States remains ill-prepared to cope with this serious and real threat.

 

 

September/October 2006

Churchill, Not Quite

Journal Article, The National Interest

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

PRESIDENT BUSH has identified the nexus of terrorism and nuclear weapons as "the single largest threat to American national security." Indeed, he has said that the United States is currently engaged in World War III and put a bust of Winston Churchill in his office. The question he should ask himself is: What would Churchill do facing a grave threat to his society and way of life? How closely do the president's actions mirror his model? An American Churchill confronting a threat of such monumental proportions would make defeating this challenge the organizing principle of U.S. foreign policy.

 

Nuclear Terrorism: The Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe

Graham Allison, founding dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, a former top official at the Pentagon, and one of America’s leading scholars of nuclear strategy and national security, presents the evidence and argument that led him to two provocative conclusions: a nuclear terrorist attack on an American city is inevitable on our current course and speed, but preventable if we act now. 

Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.