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Graham Allison

Graham Allison

Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Member of the Board

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 496-6099
Fax: (617) 495-8963
Email: graham_allison@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2004 (continued)

August 6, 2004

Lessons From a Horrific Past: Can We Prevent a Terrorist's Hiroshima?

Op-Ed, Chicago Tribune

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Can we prevent a terrorist's Hiroshima?

 

 

July 25, 2004

Zap Nuclear Terror Threat at its Source

Op-Ed, Boston Herald

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

In his opening statement releasing the 9/11 commission's report, chairman Thomas Kean highlighted the sobering fact that all experts expect a terrorist attack of greater proportions. He noted specifically that al-Qaeda aspires to attack us "with the use of chemical, biological and nuclear weapons".

 

 

June 27, 2004

Policies on Nukes Reveal Wide Gulf

Journal Article, Miami Herald

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Recently, the Senate voted in support of the Bush administration's request for funds to explore new nuclear 'bunker-buster' technology. In his major national security address in June, John Kerry specifically criticized this drive to expand our nuclear arsenal. This is but one of many significant differences between the two candidates on what Kerry called 'the greatest threat we face in the world today -- a terrorist armed with nuclear weapons.'

 

 

June 16, 2004

Questioning Bush's Foreign Policy

Op-Ed, Moscow Times

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

In the past week, Russia celebrated the 14th anniversary of its declaration of state sovereignty, and a state funeral in Washington marked the death of Ronald Reagan, the United States' 40th president. Both events remind us how much has changed since the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War.

 

 

June 12, 2004

The Eight Spoke Loudly, and Did Little

Op-Ed, International Herald Tribune

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

At the current rate, the global partnership will not secure Russia's loose nukes until 2017.

 

 

June 8, 2004

Is Tenet Where the Buck Stops?

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

It is time for the president to follow Tenet's precedent ...:

 

 

Spring 2004

"From the Director"

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Belfer Center Director Graham Allison comments on a Kennedy School case study carried out by students, the increasingly volatile situation in Iraq, national security and terrorism, amongst other recent events and current issues.

 

 

March 19, 2004

Is the U.S. Safer Than it Was a Year Ago?

Op-Ed, Chicago Tribune

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

This week's anniversary of the U.S.-led war against Iraq is an appropriate occasion to ask: Are Americans safer than we were a year ago?

 

 

January/February 2004

How to Stop Nuclear Terror

Journal Article, Foreign Affairs, issue no. 1, volume vol. 83

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

President Bush has called nuclear terror the defining threat the United States now faces. He's right, but he has yet to follow up his words with actions. This is especially frustrating since nuclear terror is preventable. Washington needs a strategy based on the "Three No's": no loose nukes, no nascent nukes, and no new nuclear states.

 

2003

Fall/Winter 2003-2004

"From the Director"

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

The flags of 100 countries carried aloft into JFK Park made for a stirring sight to kick off KSG's 25th Anniversary Public Service Celebration this past September 19. Over the last quarter-century, thousands of students from many countries-an increasing number of them women-have passed through the Kennedy School and returned to their careers and homelands with sharpened skills, deepened knowledge, and what we hope is an enriched appreciation of a broad range of viewpoints and cultures. We called this birthday party a Public Service Celebration in recognition of the contributions being made to civic life around the globe by our alumni.

 

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Nuclear Terrorism: The Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe

Graham Allison, founding dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, a former top official at the Pentagon, and one of America’s leading scholars of nuclear strategy and national security, presents the evidence and argument that led him to two provocative conclusions: a nuclear terrorist attack on an American city is inevitable on our current course and speed, but preventable if we act now. 

Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev.