Belfer Center Home > Experts > Graham Allison

« Back to Graham Allison

Graham Allison

Graham Allison

Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Member of the Board

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 496-6099
Fax: (617) 495-8963
Email: graham_allison@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2000 (continued)

September 25, 2000

A Partisan Panel Scatters Poppycock

Op-Ed, Los Angeles Times

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Twelve Republican House members, constituted as the Cox Commission on Russia, have issued a report on the Clinton administration's policy toward Russia that amounts to "sound and fury," in Shakespeare's fine phrase, "signifying nothing." Nothing except that, in the midst of a presidential campaign, a dozen Republican members of Congress dislike Clinton and Al Gore and support Texas Gov. George W. Bush.

 

 

August 23, 2000

Russia's Tragedy - and Ours

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Russian bureaucratic bungling, dissembling, delay, and delusion in effect condemned 118 sailors trapped aboard the sunken submarine Kursk to death. One is reminded of former prime minister Victor Chernomyrdin's comment on an earlier failure: "We hoped for the best, but things turned out as usual."

 

 

August 23, 2000

Russia's Tragedy and Ours

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Russian bureaucratic bungling, dissembling, delay, and delusion in effect condemned 118 sailors trapped aboard the sunken submarine Kursk to death. One is reminded of former prime minister Victor Chernomyrdin's comment on an earlier failure: 'We hoped for the best, but things turned out as usual.'

 

 

July 2000

America's National Interests: A Report from The Commission on America's National Interests, 2000

Report

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

 

 

May 31, 2000

ABCs of ABM and Missile Defense

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Re-ignition of heated debate about missile defense, the ABM Treaty, and another arms race befuddles many normal Americans. Can these cold-war relics really dominate President Clinton's agenda in his first meeting with Russia's new president next month in Moscow?

 

 

May 31, 2000

ABCs of ABM and Missile Defense

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Re-ignition of heated debate about missile defense, the ABM Treaty, and another arms race befuddles many normal Americans. Can these cold-war relics really dominate President Clinton's agenda in his first meeting with Russia's new president next month in Moscow? One is reminded of Yogi Berra's observation that this is "deja vu all over again."

 

 

April 24, 2000

Graham Allison and Sam Nunn Op-Ed: Chance for a Safer World

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Despite a decade of effort, the risks of loose nukes are larger today than they were when these efforts began. U.S. programs have had positive results, but declines in Russia's economy and in the government's ability to control anything--from money to nuclear materials--has had larger negative consequences. The good news is that Russians are ready to engage in more joint efforts to secure Russia's nuclear materials.

 

 

March 27, 2000

The Real Putin

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

The central question for Russia-watchers today is: Who is Putin? Even among fellow KGB spooks in his first profession, Putin earned a reputation for being "secretive." He personifies Winston Churchill's characterization of Russia: "A riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma."

 

 

March 27, 2000

Transcript of Graham Allison Interview on 'Talk of the Nation' (National Public Radio)

Media Interview Transcripts

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Yesterday Russia elected a new president, Vladimir Putin. The former KGB agent is just 47 and is best known for his harsh tactics in dealing with rebels in Chechnya. Putin has been acting president since January, when Boris Yeltsin resigned. He got 52 percent of the vote yesterday, and in a surprise, a Communist candidate received nearly 30 percent of the vote in the former Communist nation. In a midnight press conference Putin interpreted the sizable Communist vote as a protest by the Russian people. He said they are displeased by the current state of life in Russia. In his campaign, Putin made no promises about what he will do to improve their lives, but the nation's social welfare system is in trauma, with high levels of alcoholism, prostitution, and a very high death rate. The nation's banking and judicial systems are dysfunctional and corruption is widespread.

 

1999

December 21, 1999

The 'Democratic Presumption' is Taking Hold in Russia

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Sunday's stunning victory for Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin and his supporters in the new Unity Party surprised most observers. Just three months ago when Russian President Boris Yeltsin made Putin prime minister, knowledgeable Muscovites dismissed the Kremlin entourage as politically spent. It was judged too corrupt and too incompetent to matter.

 

SUBSCRIBE

Receive email updates on the most pressing topics in science and int'l affairs.

Nuclear Terrorism: The Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe

Graham Allison, founding dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, a former top official at the Pentagon, and one of America’s leading scholars of nuclear strategy and national security, presents the evidence and argument that led him to two provocative conclusions: a nuclear terrorist attack on an American city is inevitable on our current course and speed, but preventable if we act now. 

Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev.