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Graham Allison

Graham Allison

Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Member of the Board

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 496-6099
Fax: (617) 495-1905
Email: graham_allison@harvard.edu

 

 

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China (continued)

May 31, 2000

ABCs of ABM and Missile Defense

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Re-ignition of heated debate about missile defense, the ABM Treaty, and another arms race befuddles many normal Americans. Can these cold-war relics really dominate President Clinton's agenda in his first meeting with Russia's new president next month in Moscow? One is reminded of Yogi Berra's observation that this is "deja vu all over again."

 

 

May 31, 2000

ABCs of ABM and Missile Defense

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Re-ignition of heated debate about missile defense, the ABM Treaty, and another arms race befuddles many normal Americans. Can these cold-war relics really dominate President Clinton's agenda in his first meeting with Russia's new president next month in Moscow?

 

commons.wikimedia.org

April 4, 2016

"Could There Be a Terrorist Fukushima?"

Op-Ed, The New York Times

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School and William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

The attacks in Brussels last month were a stark reminder of the terrorists’ resolve, and of our continued vulnerabilities, including in an area of paramount concern: nuclear security.

The attackers struck an airport and the subway, but some Belgian investigators believe they seemed to have fallen back on those targets because they felt the authorities closing in on them, and that their original plan may have been to strike a nuclear plant. A few months ago, during a raid in the apartment of a suspect linked to the November attacks in Paris, investigators found surveillance footage of a senior Belgian nuclear official. Belgian police are said to have connected two of the Brussels terrorists to that footage.

 

 

(AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

July 30, 2014

"Just How Likely Is Another World War?"

Op-Ed, The Atlantic

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

"A century ago this month, Europeans stood on the brink of a war so devastating that it forced historians to create a new category: 'World War.' None of the leaders at the time could imagine the wasteland they would inhabit four years later. By 1918, each had lost what he cherished most: the kaiser dismissed, the Austro-Hungarian Empire dissolved, the tsar overthrown by the Bolsheviks, France bled for a generation, and England shorn of the flower of its youth and treasure. A millennium in which European leaders had been masters of the globe came to a crashing halt."

With lessons learned from WWI, Graham Allison asks, how likely is another world war?

 

 

(AP Photo)

February 25, 2013

"Lee Kuan Yew's China"

Op-Ed, Project Syndicate

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, Robert D. Blackwill, International Council Member, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Ali Wyne, Former Research Assistant, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Graham Allison and Robert D. Blackwill spotlight Lee Kuan Yew in their latest book, Lee Kuan Yew: The Grand Master's Insights on China, the United States, and the World.

 

 

(AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

February 16, 2013

"Will China Ever Be No. 1"

Op-Ed, Foreign Policy

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School and Robert D. Blackwill, International Council Member, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Will China continue to grow three times faster than the United States to become the No. 1 economy in the world in the decade ahead? Does China aspire to be the No. 1 power in Asia and ultimately the world? As it becomes a great power, will China follow the path taken by Japan in becoming an honorary member of the West? Graham sAllison and Robert Blackwill suggest that while nobody knows the answer to these questions, the person they believe should be consulted for an answer is Lee Kuan Yew.

 

 

August 12, 2005

Thwart Terrorists' Dream of American Hiroshima

Op-Ed, The Albuquerque Journal

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Sixty years ago, the Americans ended World War II by dropping Little Boy and Fat Man from B-29 bombers onto Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This was the explosive climax to the military's most expensive weapons program — the Manhattan Project to design and build a nuclear bomb.

 

 

August 6, 2005

Sixty Years Later: Hiroshima and the Bomb

Op-Ed, Center for American Progress

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

On August 6, 1945, the United States carried out the first attack with nuclear weapons, against the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The weapon would fundamentally alter the face of conflict, and shape strategic thinking for subsequent generations. If strategists couldn't always agree on what force posture the United States should adopt, there was consistently broad agreement that the spread of nuclear weapons posed a fundamental threat to United States national security.

 

 

August 9, 2004

Lessons of Nagasaki for Fighting Terrorism

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

THE NUCLEAR bomb dropped on Hiroshima became an icon of the nuclear age, seared into the collective consciousness of postwar Americans by John Hersey's classic book. Fewer Americans remember much about the destruction of Nagasaki three days later on Aug. 9, 1945, and fewer still have reflected on lessons it offers for threats we face today.

 

 

August 6, 2004

Lessons From a Horrific Past: Can We Prevent a Terrorist's Hiroshima?

Op-Ed, Chicago Tribune

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Can we prevent a terrorist's Hiroshima?

 

Nuclear Terrorism: The Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe

Graham Allison, founding dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, a former top official at the Pentagon, and one of America’s leading scholars of nuclear strategy and national security, presents the evidence and argument that led him to two provocative conclusions: a nuclear terrorist attack on an American city is inevitable on our current course and speed, but preventable if we act now. 

Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.