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Graham Allison

Graham Allison

Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Member of the Board

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 496-6099
Fax: (617) 495-8963
Email: graham_allison@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2001 (continued)

June 18, 2001

Graham Allison and Paul Volcker: U.S. Needs A Post-IMF Russia Policy

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Much of the news coverage of Saturday's summit between Presidents Bush and Putin focused on traditional security concerns. But at least as important are the economic relations between the U.S. and Russia. It's time to get this important issue right -- and to end an era dominated by the International Monetary Fund.

 

 

April 30, 2001

"U.S. Policy on Caspian Energy Development and Exports: Mini-Case and Paradigm"

Paper

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Drawing on the Caspian Studies Program's ongoing research, my colleague Emily Van Buskirk and I prepared a case on U.S. policy on Caspian energy development and exports for a Kennedy School course I teach with Ambassador Robert Blackwill. Using the case, our sixty students examined central questions including: What is the most effective way to promote the development of Caspian energy resources? What is the proper role of government in large-scale capital projects? Where does the Caspian Basin rank in the hierarchy of U.S. national interests?

 

 

April 3, 2001

US-Russian Dialogue Needed to Head Off New Cold War

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Mutual retaliation in the "spy wars" that broke out last month fueled what was already shaping up to become a new rhetorical Cold War. Hyperbole about Russia as a new "threat" and "active proliferator," in the words of Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, has puzzled some Russians and alarmed others. The critique of the United States by Sergei Ivanov - then the Russian national security adviser and now defense minister - at a gathering of security graybeards in Munich in February shocked American participants, including Mr. Rumsfeld. Competition in accentuating the negative about each other's actions and intentions revives an image of Russia and America as primary adversaries in international affairs.

 

 

March 30, 2001

Graham Allison: US-Russian Relations at Lowest Point Since Cold War

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

March 30, 2001 -- The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 signaled the end of the Cold War, or did it? The Bush administration recently ordered the expulsion of 50 Russian diplomats believed to be spies from Washington. In a response reminiscent of the Cold War, Russia retaliated in kind. Russia is expanding sale of arms to Iran and nuclear power plant fuel supplies to India. President Bush has indicated he will press forward with a US national missile defense system even at the risk of violating the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty signed with the Soviet Union.

 

 

February 18, 2001

'Thirteen Days' and its Ageless Lessons for Tomorrow

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

The movie 'Thirteen Days' dramatizes the most dangerous moment in human history: the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. It also reminds us vividly of an inescapable truth about the world today. As George W. Bush took office, the United States and Russia each continued to maintain active arsenals of more than 4,000 nuclear warheads on alert missiles ready for momentary launching. The new president thus serves not only as American commander in chief and leader of the free world, but also as final arbiter of the nation's survival.

 

 

January 31, 2001

Graham Allison op-ed: A Missed Opportunity in the Mideast?

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Barring a moment-to-midnight miracle, Israeli and Palestinian leaders have just missed this generation's best opportunity for peace. In retrospect, Palestinians are likely to judge Chairman Yasser Arafat harshly for having failed to seize the most advantageous terms for the establishment of a viable Palestinian state since the partition resolution of 1948. Having tried so vigorously for peace, but failed, participants will now see what it means to give the alternative a chance.

 

2000

November 16, 2000

Graham Allison op-ed: Enough Already! Don't Elian-ize the Presidency

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Now is the time for Americans to stand up and say: enough already. Public faith in the legitimacy of our democracy matters more than the differences between two worthy candidates. We must demand that the men who would be president demonstrate leadership now to prevent America's highest office from sinking into the swamp of the Elian syndrome.

 

 

September 25, 2000

A Partisan Panel Scatters Poppycock

Op-Ed, Los Angeles Times

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Twelve Republican House members, constituted as the Cox Commission on Russia, have issued a report on the Clinton administration's policy toward Russia that amounts to "sound and fury," in Shakespeare's fine phrase, "signifying nothing." Nothing except that, in the midst of a presidential campaign, a dozen Republican members of Congress dislike Clinton and Al Gore and support Texas Gov. George W. Bush.

 

 

August 23, 2000

Russia's Tragedy - and Ours

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Russian bureaucratic bungling, dissembling, delay, and delusion in effect condemned 118 sailors trapped aboard the sunken submarine Kursk to death. One is reminded of former prime minister Victor Chernomyrdin's comment on an earlier failure: "We hoped for the best, but things turned out as usual."

 

 

August 23, 2000

Russia's Tragedy and Ours

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Russian bureaucratic bungling, dissembling, delay, and delusion in effect condemned 118 sailors trapped aboard the sunken submarine Kursk to death. One is reminded of former prime minister Victor Chernomyrdin's comment on an earlier failure: 'We hoped for the best, but things turned out as usual.'

 

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Nuclear Terrorism: The Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe

Graham Allison, founding dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, a former top official at the Pentagon, and one of America’s leading scholars of nuclear strategy and national security, presents the evidence and argument that led him to two provocative conclusions: a nuclear terrorist attack on an American city is inevitable on our current course and speed, but preventable if we act now. 

Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev.