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Graham Allison

Graham Allison

Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Member of the Board

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 496-6099
Fax: (617) 495-8963
Email: graham_allison@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2002 (continued)

February 1, 2002

Kazakhstan TV's interview with Graham Allison

Media Interview Transcripts

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

INTERVIEWER: It is not just heads of state and diplomats who determine the development of interstate relations. For instance, the Belfer Center of Science and International Affairs is one of the most influential "brain trusts" in the United States. Operating as part of the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, it provides long-term analysis of the current state of the world, which has changed so much since the end of the Cold War. Graham Allison, a former U.S. assistant secretary of defense and nowadays a university professor, is director of this research center. He is convinced that Kazakhstan has a major role to play in the strategic allocation of forces in the world arena. We recently had a chance to meet this prominent American political scientist at Harvard.

 

 

January 6, 2002

Kazakhstan's Antinuclear Role

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

WHEN KAZAKHSTAN is mentioned, most people think of one thing: oil. As the principal source of Caspian energy, Kazakhstan supplies world markets directly through the Caspian Pipeline Consortium.

Opened in September, this pipeline has a capacity of 1 million barrels a day. Furthermore, Kashagan field has been acclaimed as the most significant new discovery of reserves in the past quarter-century.

When President Bush met with Kazakhstan's President Nursultan Nazarbayev at the White House in December, they discussed Kazakhstan's new role in world energy and the campaign against terrorism. The meeting resulted in a joint statement that affirmed their strategic partnership and a US intention to help Kazakhstan integrate more fully into the global economy.

While this meeting addressed important goals, it should also have underlined the significant role Kazakhstan has played in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Nazarbayev now has an opportunity to extend that legacy by leading the negotiations for the Central Asian Nuclear Weapon Free Zone Treaty.

 

 

January 6, 2002

Graham Allison: Kazakhstan's Antinuclear Role

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

WHEN KAZAKHSTAN is mentioned, most people think of one thing: oil. As the principal source of Caspian energy, Kazakhstan supplies world markets directly through the Caspian Pipeline Consortium. Opened in September, this pipeline has a capacity of 1 million barrels a day. Furthermore, Kashagan field has been acclaimed as the most significant new discovery of reserves in the past quarter-century. When President Bush met with Kazakhstan's President Nursultan Nazarbayev at the White House in December, they discussed Kazakhstan's new role in world energy and the campaign against terrorism. The meeting resulted in a joint statement that affirmed their strategic partnership and a US intention to help Kazakhstan integrate more fully into the global economy.

 

2001

November 21, 2001

Graham Allison, Karl Kaiser, Sergei Karaganov: The World Needs a Global Alliance for Security

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

In the aftermath of September 11th, the authors propose that the world's greatest powers consider creating a new 'Global Alliance for Security.' Given the seriousness of the terrorist threat, the mission of this alliance would be to prevent and fight terrorism, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and the infrastructure of international criminal activities and drug traffic that feed terrorist networks. It would also address the causes of terrorism in failed or failing political regimes and societies.

 

 

November 20, 2001

Graham Allison: Preventing Terrorism in the Air: A How-to-guide for Nervous Airline Passengers

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

As Americans take to the airways for Thanksgiving, what responsibilities should passengers assume for securing the aircraft against terrorists? Flight attendants routinely instruct those who sit in emergency rows about their responsibilities in the case of an emergency. But what about a security emergency?

 

 

November 18, 2001

Graham Allison: We Must Act As If He Has The Bomb

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

The question is suddenly urgent: Could the inconceivable happen? President Bush has previously warned the world that Osama bin Laden is seeking to develop weapons of mass destruction. Now, bin Laden himself claims to have chemical and nuclear weapons -- and "the right to use them." We cannot know for certain whether he is bluffing, but Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge has confirmed that documents detailing how to make nuclear weapons have been found in an al Qaeda safe house in Kabul. And we can certainly expect that as the noose tightens aroundthe terrorist''s neck, he and his associates will become increasingly desperate.

 

 

November 18, 2001

Graham Allison: Nuclear Terrorism: It's the Plutonium, Stupid

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Osama bin Laden gave them the perfect opening. Just before President Bush welcomed Russian President Vladimir V. Putin to the White House for last week's summit, a Pakistani newspaper quoted the Al Qaeda leader claiming to have "chemical and nuclear weapons" and "the right to use them."

 

 

November 16, 2001

Graham Allison and Andrei Kokoshin: A US-Russian Alliance Against Megaterrorism

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

President Bush has warned the world that Osama bin Laden is ''seeking to develop weapons of mass destruction.'' To meet this threat, the United States and Russia should take the lead in establishing an Alliance Against Megaterrorism. What should have been a crowning achievement of this week's summit was sadly a missed opportunity.

 

 

November 1, 2001

Graham Allison: Could Worse Be Yet to Come?

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

Whether or not Osama bin Laden has acquired nuclear weapons, Graham Allison argues that the world must respond as though he has—and without delay AL-QAEDA'S terrorist assault on September 11th awakened Americans to the stark reality of mega-terrorism: terrorist acts that kill thousands of people at a single stroke. In the twinkling of an eye, possibilities earlier dismissed as analysts' (or Hollywood's) fantasies became brute fact. President George Bush rightly and resolutely declared war on Osama bin Laden, al-Qaeda, and their Taliban hosts.

 

 

October 14, 2001

Graham Allison: Bombing Afghanistan with Food

Press Release

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

President Bush has taken an important first step in recognizing that the war on terrorism must involve not only destroying Osama bin Laden''s terrorism network, but also supporting Afghanistan''s civilian population through what is becoming an extreme humanitarian crisis. The president''s pledge of $320 million of food and medical aid for Afghanistan''s people and the dropping of 37,000 meals during the first American bombing raids should be commended.

 

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Nuclear Terrorism: The Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe

Graham Allison, founding dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, a former top official at the Pentagon, and one of America’s leading scholars of nuclear strategy and national security, presents the evidence and argument that led him to two provocative conclusions: a nuclear terrorist attack on an American city is inevitable on our current course and speed, but preventable if we act now. 

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