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January 2014

"Making Sense of Cyberwar"

Policy Brief

By Erik Gartzke

"The internet is said to be revolutionary because it is a leveler—reducing Western military advantages—and because dependence on the internet makes developed countries more vulnerable to attack. The conviction that the internet is an Achilles' heel for the existing world order is based on narrow conceptions of the potential for harm. The internet cannot perform functions traditionally assigned to military force. To the contrary, cyberwar creates another advantage for powerful status quo nations and interests."

 

AP Photo

January 2014

"Making Sense of Cyberwar"

Policy Brief

By Erik Gartzke

"The internet is said to be revolutionary because it is a leveler—reducing Western military advantages—and because dependence on the internet makes developed countries more vulnerable to attack. The conviction that the internet is an Achilles' heel for the existing world order is based on narrow conceptions of the potential for harm. The internet cannot perform functions traditionally assigned to military force. To the contrary, cyberwar creates another advantage for powerful status quo nations and interests."

 

AP Photo

January 2014

"Making Sense of Cyberwar"

Policy Brief

By Erik Gartzke

"The internet is said to be revolutionary because it is a leveler—reducing Western military advantages—and because dependence on the internet makes developed countries more vulnerable to attack. The conviction that the internet is an Achilles' heel for the existing world order is based on narrow conceptions of the potential for harm. The internet cannot perform functions traditionally assigned to military force. To the contrary, cyberwar creates another advantage for powerful status quo nations and interests."

 

U.S. Navy Photo

Fall 2013

"The Myth of Cyberwar: Bringing War in Cyberspace Back Down to Earth"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 2, volume 38

By Erik Gartzke

Cyberwar has been described as a revolution in military affairs capable of overturning the prevailing world order. By itself, however, cyberwar can achieve neither conquest nor, in most cases, coercion. Conflict over the internet is much more likely to serve as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, existing modes of terrestrial force, and to augment the advantages of status quo powers rather than threatening existing political hierarchies.

 

U.S. Navy Photo

Fall 2013

"The Myth of Cyberwar: Bringing War in Cyberspace Back Down to Earth"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 2, volume 38

By Erik Gartzke

Cyberwar has been described as a revolution in military affairs capable of overturning the prevailing world order. By itself, however, cyberwar can achieve neither conquest nor, in most cases, coercion. Conflict over the internet is much more likely to serve as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, existing modes of terrestrial force, and to augment the advantages of status quo powers rather than threatening existing political hierarchies.

 

U.S. Navy Photo

Fall 2013

"The Myth of Cyberwar: Bringing War in Cyberspace Back Down to Earth"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 2, volume 38

By Erik Gartzke

Cyberwar has been described as a revolution in military affairs capable of overturning the prevailing world order. By itself, however, cyberwar can achieve neither conquest nor, in most cases, coercion. Conflict over the internet is much more likely to serve as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, existing modes of terrestrial force, and to augment the advantages of status quo powers rather than threatening existing political hierarchies.

 

U.S. Navy Photo

Fall 2013

"The Myth of Cyberwar: Bringing War in Cyberspace Back Down to Earth"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 2, volume 38

By Erik Gartzke

Cyberwar has been described as a revolution in military affairs capable of overturning the prevailing world order. By itself, however, cyberwar can achieve neither conquest nor, in most cases, coercion. Conflict over the internet is much more likely to serve as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, existing modes of terrestrial force, and to augment the advantages of status quo powers rather than threatening existing political hierarchies.

 

U.S. Navy Photo

Fall 2013

"The Myth of Cyberwar: Bringing War in Cyberspace Back Down to Earth"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 2, volume 38

By Erik Gartzke

Cyberwar has been described as a revolution in military affairs capable of overturning the prevailing world order. By itself, however, cyberwar can achieve neither conquest nor, in most cases, coercion. Conflict over the internet is much more likely to serve as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, existing modes of terrestrial force, and to augment the advantages of status quo powers rather than threatening existing political hierarchies.

 

 

Spring 2012

"Trading on Preconceptions: Why World War I Was Not a Failure of Economic Interdependence"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 36, volume 4

By Erik Gartzke and Yonatan Lupu

A close look at the events leading up to World War I reveals that the war was not a failure of economic integration as many scholars have claimed. The conflict began in a weakly integrated portion of Europe, and the more integrated powers were roped in through their alliances. Before the war, the interdependent powers were able to resolve crises without bloodshed, but they were also incentivized to increase their commitment to the less interdependent powers. Had globalization pervaded Eastern Europe, or if the rest of Europe had been less locked into events in the east, Europe might have avoided a “Great War.”

 

U.S. Navy Photo

Fall 2013

"The Myth of Cyberwar: Bringing War in Cyberspace Back Down to Earth"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 2, volume 38

By Erik Gartzke

Cyberwar has been described as a revolution in military affairs capable of overturning the prevailing world order. By itself, however, cyberwar can achieve neither conquest nor, in most cases, coercion. Conflict over the internet is much more likely to serve as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, existing modes of terrestrial force, and to augment the advantages of status quo powers rather than threatening existing political hierarchies.

 

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