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Eric S. Edelman

Eric S. Edelman

Former Senior Associate, International Security Program, May 2009–June 2013

 

Experience

Former Senior Associate, International Security Program, May 2009–June 2013

 

 

By Date

 

2012

November 1, 2012

"Obama's Failed Foreign Policy"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Eliot A. Cohen, Eric S. Edelman, Former Senior Associate, International Security Program, May 2009–June 2013 and Meghan L. O'Sullivan, Jeane Kirkpatrick Professor of the Practice of International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

"Because of the last four years, we face a world in which our enemies do not fear us, our friends do not believe they can trust us, and those who maneuver between the two camps feel that they will not get in trouble by crossing us. It is time, and more than time, to choose a different course."

 

2011

AP Photo

May/June 2011

"Fool Me Twice: How the United States Lost Lebanon—Again"

Journal Article, World Affairs

By Eric S. Edelman, Former Senior Associate, International Security Program, May 2009–June 2013 and Mara E. Karlin

"For the second time in three decades, a substantial American investment of time, money, and effort to strengthen the Lebanese government and support its fledgling democracy has come to very little. Hezbollah, Tehran, and Damascus now dominate the country’s intractable domestic politics. US diplomacy is left powerless, wondering how to make the best of an increasingly untenable situation in the Levant."

 

 

AP Photo

January/February 2011

"The Dangers of A Nuclear Iran: The Limits of Containment"

Journal Article, Foreign Affairs

By Eric S. Edelman, Former Senior Associate, International Security Program, May 2009–June 2013, Andrew F. Krepinevich and Evan Braden Montgomery

Iran's acquisition of a nuclear bomb would upend the Middle East. It is unclear how a nuclear-armed Iran would weigh the costs, benefits, and risks of brinkmanship, meaning that it could be difficult to deter Tehran from attacking the United States' interests or partners in the region.

 

2010

AP Photo

2010

Understanding America's Contested Primacy

Report

By Eric S. Edelman, Former Senior Associate, International Security Program, May 2009–June 2013

"A rigorous assessment should consider the strengths and weaknesses of the United States' putative competitors on the global scene as well as the enduring strengths and sources of resilience that have enabled America to extend its primacy and maintain a stabilizing, global hegemonic role against all expectations. There is a need for a framework to inform how US policymakers might think about the problem of developing strategies and policies to extend that role yet again, since it is at least an arguable proposition that rather than a multipolar world, the global system, after the current Great Recession passes, will continue to be unipolar but with some additional challenges for US leadership."

 

 

AP Photo

July/August 2010

"A Special Relationship in Jeopardy"

Journal Article, American Interest, issue 6, volume V

By Eric S. Edelman, Former Senior Associate, International Security Program, May 2009–June 2013

"...[A]ll this shows is that a special relationship need not be an antiseptically harmonious and boring one to still be special. On the contrary: What is special, and atypical, is that the relationship has grown rather than suffered from its conflicts. The "long wait" in the nuclear domain was punctuated by a generous British offer of bases for U.S. B-29 bombers and culminated in unprecedented and intensified cooperation in the nuclear arena. Suez precipitated the "golden days" of the Anglo-American relationship under Macmillan, Eisenhower and Kennedy. The twin crises over the Falklands and Grenada did not prevent George Shultz from concluding that the Reagan-Thatcher relationship was "as close as any imaginable between two major leaders." The disputes over Bosnia presaged a deep cooperation in the Kosovo War. One need not look at the "special relationship" through a Panglossian lens to conclude that it has been real and durable, and has made an enormous contribution to the successful conclusion of the Cold War and the effort at maintaining international order in a disorderly post–Cold War world."

 

2009

AP Photo

July 6, 2009

"Defense For a Real Threat"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Trey Obering and Eric S. Edelman, Former Senior Associate, International Security Program, May 2009–June 2013

"The East-West Institute released a study in late May by U.S. and Russian "experts" on the Iranian missile threat that concluded the threat "is not imminent and that in any event the system currently proposed would not be effective against it." The next day, Defense Secretary Robert Gates says, Iran apparently tested a multistage, solid-propellant missile with a range of 1,200 to 1,500 miles, putting much of Europe within range."

 

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