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Melissa Hathaway

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Melissa Hathaway

Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

Contact:
Email: HathawayGlobalStrategies@verizon.net

 

Experience

Melissa Hathaway, former acting senior director for cyberspace at the National Security Council, has joined Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs as a senior advisor to its cyber security initiative, Project Minerva, a joint effort between the Department of Defense, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard University. The project explores a wide range of the issues within cyber security from the contexts of international relations theory and practice.

Hathaway worked on cyber security for Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama until August 2009, when she left to establish Hathaway Global Strategies, LLC. She led President Obama's 60-Day Cyberspace Policy Review from February-May 2009. During her time directing the Cyberspace Policy Review at the White House, she assembled a team of experienced government cyber experts and inventoried relevant presidential policy directives, executive orders, national strategies and studies from government advisory boards and private sector entities. Her outreach resulted in more than 100 papers that informed the recommendations. She produced a comprehensive report that contained multiple annexes and 25 near-term and mid-term recommendations. After reviewing this report, President Obama announced in May that cyber security is one of his administration's priorities.

While serving as acting senior director for cyber security at the National Security Council, Hathaway convened the policy meetings that began work against each of the top ten recommendations contained in the Cyberspace Policy Review and set the expectation and pace to move the United States toward a stronger, more resilient information and communications infrastructure.

Prior to her appointment in February 2009, Hathaway served as cyber coordination executive and director of the Joint Interagency Cyber Task Force within the Office of the Director of National Intelligence from March 2007 to February 2009. There, she built a broad coalition from within the Executive branch under Presidents Bush and Obama, developing a cyber security strategy covering unprecedented scope and scale that now facilitates improvements for the United States to secure and defend its critical national infrastructures. She developed and created a unified cross-agency budget submission for FY 2008 and for 2009–2013, assembling disparate funding sources into a coherent, integrated program. One of the single largest intelligence programs of the Bush administration, the Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative, has been carried forward by the Obama administration.

Hathaway has a B.A. degree from The American University in Washington, D.C. She has completed graduate studies in international economics and technology transfer policy and is a graduate of the U.S. Armed Forces Staff College, with a special certificate in Information Operations.

 

 

By Date

 

2014

February 2014

"Advanced Research Workshop Findings"

Book Chapter

By Melissa Hathaway, Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

This chapter informs NATO cyber defense policy and presents operators and decision-makers with genuine tools and expert advice for computer network defense, incident detection, and incident response.

 

 

February 2014

Best Practices in Computer Network Defense: Incident Detection and Response

Book

By Melissa Hathaway, Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

The cyber security of vital infrastructure and services has become a major concern for countries worldwide. The members of NATO are no exception, and they share a responsibility to help the global community to strengthen its cyber defenses against malicious cyber activity. This book presents 10 papers and 21 specific findings from the NATO Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) "Best Practices in Computer Network Defense (CND): Incident Detection and Response", held in Geneva, Switzerland, in September 2013.

 

2013

Cisco Photo

November 8, 2013

"Cyber Readiness Index 1.0"

Paper

By Melissa Hathaway, Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

The Cyber Readiness Index (CRI) examines thirty-five countries that have embraced ICT and the Internet and compares their maturity and commitment to protecting those investments using an initial objective assessment of where countries stand in cyber security in five areas.

 

 

May 14, 2013

"Change the Conversation, Change the Venue and Change Our Future"

Op-Ed

By Melissa Hathaway, Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

"The G20 has an opportunity to articulate a vision for shaping the Internet economy for the next five to 10 years. The power of the leadership of this body, combined with its ability to assemble and speak to a simple, positive narrative for cybersecurity anchored in our collective economic well-being (and GDP growth), could be a watershed event. The GDP erosion that all nations are suffering places cybersecurity within the legitimate processes and 'architecture' of international economic governance. By changing the conversation to being about the economy and growth, this approach would enable the G20 to de-escalate the militarization and balkanization of the Internet."

 

 

2012

"Leadership and Responsibility for Cybersecurity"

Journal Article, Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, Special Issue

By Melissa Hathaway, Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

"Policy makers, legislators, and businessmen should assess the gap between the current defense posture and our needed front line defense in the face of an increasingly sophisticated range of actors. This paper describes a series of case studies that highlight the lack of attention being paid to this serious problem and the subsequent policy and technology solutions that are being brought to bear to close the gap."

 

 

December 2012

"Preliminary Considerations: On National Cyber Security"

Book Chapter

By Melissa Hathaway, Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age and Alexander Klimburg, Research Fellow, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

In this chapter, Melissa Hathaway and Alexander Klimburg introduce three conceptual tools to help focus the strategic context and debate. These are termed the "three dimensions," the "five mandates," and the "five dilemmas" of national cyber security. Each dimension, mandate and dilemma will play a varying role in each nation's attempt to formulate and execute a national cyber security strategy according to their specific conditions.

 

2012

September 19, 2012

"Cyber Security Today: A United States Perspective"

Presentation

By Melissa Hathaway, Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

Implementing complementary government and private sector cyber protection policies remains a challenge. In a recent International Relations and Security Network/Center for Security Studies–sponsored presentation, Explorations in Cyber International Relations Senior Advisor Melissa Hathaway identified five major reasons why governments and their partners are still having trouble developing effective cyber security strategies.

 

 

February 2012

"Falling Prey to Cybercrime: Implications for Business and the Economy"

Book Chapter

By Melissa Hathaway, Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

As American businesses, inventors, and artists market, sell, and distribute their products worldwide via the Internet, the threat from criminals and criminal organizations who want to profit illegally from their hard work grows. The threat from other nations wanting to jump start their industries without making the intellectual investment is even more disturbing. This fleecing of America must stop. We can no longer afford complacency and silence—we must find and use as many market levers as possible to change the path we are on.

 

 

AP Photo

Spring 2012

"Internet Service Providers are the Front Line of Cyber-defence"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Europe'sWorld

By Melissa Hathaway, Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

"What is needed is a holistic approach by governments around the world, with policies, laws and regulatory frameworks that support the communications sector and ISPs as they provide security to ensure the internet remains a public good."

 

 

AP Photo

March 2012

"Duties for Internet Service Providers"

Paper

By Melissa Hathaway, Senior Advisor, Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age and John E. Savage

In today's interconnected world, the Internet is no longer a tool. Rather, it is a service that helps generate income and employment, provides access to business and information, enables e-learning, and facilitates government activities. It is an essential service that has been integrated into every part of our society. Our experience begins when an Internet Service Provider (ISP) uses fixed telephony (plain old telephone service), mobile-cellular telephony, or fixed fiber-optic or broadband service to connect us to the global network. From that moment on, the ISP shoulders the responsibility for the instantaneous, reliable, and secure movement of our data over the Internet.

 

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