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Spring 2012

"Correspondence: Decline and Retrenchment: Peril or Promise?"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 36, volume 4

By William R. Thompson, Kyle Haynes, Paul MacDonald, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2006-2008 and Joseph M. Parent

Kyle Haynes and William R. Thompson respond to Paul K. MacDonald and Joseph M. Parent's spring 2011†International Security article, "Graceful Decline? The Surprising Success of Great Power Retrenchment."

 

Fall 2011

"Correspondence: Sea Powers, Continental Powers, and Balancing Theory"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 2, volume 36

By David W. Blagden, Jack S. Levy and William R. Thompson

David W. Blagden responds to Jack S. Levy and William R. Thompson's summer 2010 International Security article, "Balancing on Land and at Sea: Do States Ally against the Leading Global Power?"

 

Fall 2011

"Correspondence: Sea Powers, Continental Powers, and Balancing Theory"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 2, volume 36

By David W. Blagden, Jack S. Levy and William R. Thompson

David W. Blagden responds to Jack S. Levy and William R. Thompson's summer 2010 International Security article, "Balancing on Land and at Sea: Do States Ally against the Leading Global Power?"

 

 

AP Photo

Summer 2010

"Balancing on Land and at Sea: Do States Ally against the Leading Global Power?"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 1, volume 35

By Jack S. Levy and William R. Thompson

Scholars often interpret balance of power theory to imply that great powers almost always balance against the leading power in the system, and they conclude that the absence of a counterbalancing coalition against the historically unprecedented power of the United States after the end of the Cold War is a puzzle for balance of power theory. They are wrong on both counts. Balance of power theory is not universally applicable.

 

Fall 2011

"Correspondence: Sea Powers, Continental Powers, and Balancing Theory"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 2, volume 36

By David W. Blagden, Jack S. Levy and William R. Thompson

David W. Blagden responds to Jack S. Levy and William R. Thompson's summer 2010 International Security article, "Balancing on Land and at Sea: Do States Ally against the Leading Global Power?"

 

 

AP Photo

Summer 2010

"Balancing on Land and at Sea: Do States Ally against the Leading Global Power?"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 1, volume 35

By Jack S. Levy and William R. Thompson

Scholars often interpret balance of power theory to imply that great powers almost always balance against the leading power in the system, and they conclude that the absence of a counterbalancing coalition against the historically unprecedented power of the United States after the end of the Cold War is a puzzle for balance of power theory. They are wrong on both counts. Balance of power theory is not universally applicable.

 

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