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Tolu Odumosu

Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

Contact:
Email: tolu_odumosu@hks.harvard.edu
Website: http://tolu.odumosu.info/

 

Experience

Tolu Odumosu is an Associate in the Science, Technology and Public Policy Program. Topically, his research is focused on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), with particular emphasis on mobile devices and their appropriation, the design and implementation of national telecommunications infrastructure, and the governance of transnational ICT technical standards organizations. Theoretically, most of Dr. Odumosu's work focuses on developing and expanding the notion of "constitutive appropriation" as an analytical framework, geared towards a more robust theory of democratic participation that includes both human and non-human elements.

Tolu was most recently a fellow in the Program on Science, Technology & Society where he completed his Ph.D. dissertation work, which examined Nigeria's adoption and use of mobile communication technologies. He holds a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a M.Eng. from Cornell University in Electrical and Computer Engineering, and a B.Sc. (Honors) in Electrical Electronics Engineering from the University of Lagos, Nigeria.

 

 

By Date

 

2015

November 2015

"The Social Science of Creativity and Research Practice: Physical Scientists, Take Notice"

Op-Ed, Physics Today

By Tolu Odumosu, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age, Jeff Y. Tsao and Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy; Professor of Physics, Harvard; Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

"...[M]any of our most pressing planetary-scale problems are physical-science based. Moreover, if the physical sciences can integrate the new social sciences knowledge, tools, and insight in frequent cycles of selfexamination, then the interaction will not be so much a study by an outsider but rather a process of self-reflection and improvement based on sound science. Many current standard metrics of research effectiveness—for example, the h-index—suffer from well documented shortcomings. That alone should provide ample reason to try something new and to engage with our social sciences colleagues to improve our research practice."

 

 

September 19-20, 2014

Inventing the Future to Address Societal Challenges: Venky Narayanamurti's 75th Birthday

Event Report

By Laura Diaz Anadon, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Tolu Odumosu, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age and Nidhi R. Santen, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group (ETIP), January 16–30, 2015; Former Project Manager, ETIP, July 2014–January 16, 2015; Former Fellow, ETIP, 2012–2014

Some of America's most distinguished leaders in academia, science, and technology gathered at Harvard on September 19 and 20, 2014, to celebrate the 75th birthday of renowned Harvard scientist Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti — and to discuss the future of innovation in America.

 

2013

December 2013

Art and Science of Science and Technology: Proceedings of the Forum and Roundtable

Conference Proceedings

By Jeff Y. Tsao, Glory R. Emmanuel, Tolu Odumosu, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age and Austin R. Silva

The purpose of this Forum and Roundtable was to initiate a dialog between the two communities: distinguished practitioners of the art of research and experts in the emerging science of research.

 

 

February 2013

"The Discovery-Invention Cycle: Bridging the Basic/Applied Dichotomy"

Discussion Paper

By Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy; Professor of Physics, Harvard; Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Tolu Odumosu, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age and Lee Vinsel

In this paper we hope to provide an alternative point of view. By examining both the evolution of the famous "linear model of innovation" — which holds that scientific research precedes technological innovation — and the problematic description of engineering being "applied science" we seek to challenge the existing dichotomies between basic / applied research, science and engineering, tracing how knowledge travels between different knowledge domains through a case study of a selected group of Nobel Prizes in physics.

 

 

Winter 2013

"RIP: The Basic/Applied Research Dichotomy"

Journal Article, Issues in Science and Technology, issue 2, volume XXIX

By Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy; Professor of Physics, Harvard; Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Tolu Odumosu, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age and Lee Vinsel

"This mini-history reveals how knowledge grows through a richly interwoven system of scientific and technological research in which there is no clear hierarchy of importance and no straightforward linear trajectory. Accepting this reality has profound implications for the design of research institutions, the allocation of resources, and the national policies that guide research. This in turn can open the door to game-changing discoveries and inventions and put the nation on the path to a more sustainable science and technology ecosystem."

 

2012

December 31, 2012

"Technological Somnambulism Revisited: Sleeping through the New Invisible Surveillance Technologies"

Op-Ed, Vignettes@STS.Next.20

By Tolu Odumosu, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

"...[T]his kind of surveillance was seen as unproblematic even in a field as sensitive to informed consent as medicine, is cause for reflection. As the patient, who had to take this device into my home, I was never asked for my consent, neither was I informed of the data recording capabilities of the CPAP machine."

 

 

December 3, 2012

"4 Ways to Get Phone Service the Next Time a Hurricane Sandy Calls"

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Tolu Odumosu, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age and Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy; Professor of Physics, Harvard; Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

In the aftermath of a disaster such as superstorm Sandy, two-way communication is essential. People need to be able to receive news and updates, and to request assistance and provide status updates to loved ones. Yet after hurricane Sandy, large portions of New York, New Jersey, and other areas lost their communication systems — their mobile phone network, cable TV, and Internet. Some sought out the last few pay phones as the only equipment that worked. Here are four ways to better prepare our phones and other devices for the next disaster.

 

 

Winter 2012

"Toward a Common Wireless Market"

Op-Ed, Issues in Science and Technology

By Tolu Odumosu, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age and Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy; Professor of Physics, Harvard; Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

"With different policies and a focus on interoperability, the FCC can move the wireless industry toward a single interoperable market in which consumers have real choice and flexibility. This truly competitive market is achievable in the near future, and it can be reached with minimal financial and logistical impact on mobile wireless operators...."

 

2011

Martha Stewart Photo

March 25, 2011

Communications & Internet Policy—Panel Discussion

Media Feature

By Tolu Odumosu, Associate, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program/Project on Technology, Security, and Conflict in the Cyber Age

The Communications & Internet Policy panel had a far ranging discussion at Harvard Kennedy School's September 2010 Technology & Governance 2.0 conference on the pressing policy challenges in the Information and Communications Technology space, Topics covered include, IPV4 to IPV6 challenge, competitive pressures in cable vs. fiber optics, Internet Governance, and the problems of Internet advertising.

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.