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Ariane Tabatabai

Ariane Tabatabai

Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

Contact:
Email: ariane_tabatabai@hks.harvard.edu

 

Experience

Ariane Tabatabai is an associate in the Belfer Center's International Security Program and Project at Managing the Atom and a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of War Studies at King's College London. Her research addresses the strategic implications of the legality of nuclear weapons under Islamic law. Her research interests include international and regional security, nuclear proliferation, arms control, terrorism, and Islamic law. She holds an M.A. in International Peace and Security with Distinction from King's College London and a double B.A. in Political Science and Cinema and Cultural Studies cum laude from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. She is a non-resident Research Associate with the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies. She is fluent in Persian and French.

 

 

By Date

 

2014

October 13, 2014

"Does it Matter if Iran Developed Nuclear Weapons at Parchin?"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"Last week, an explosion at the Iranian military complex known as Parchin drew even more attention to the site, already one of the most contentious in the country's nuclear dossier. Since satellite imagery of the October 5 blast surfaced on the Internet, it has been pored over by non-proliferation experts and provoked ill-informed analysis by Iran hawks."

 

 

Wikimedia CC

September 23, 2014

"Can Nuclear Talks Overcome Arak?"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

The nuclear program is naturally an important area where Tehran wants to become self-reliant. This is certainly driven by pride and revolutionary ideals, but also by concerns stemming from the country's experience of being denied fuel and technology in the past.

 

 

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September 16, 2014

"How the Iranian Media Distort that Country's Nuclear Lens"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"Most Iranians don't care about the right to enrich. Nor do they care how many centrifuges spin in their country. Most are not able to say how many centrifuges are currently operating, or what they think a reasonable number would be in a comprehensive deal. But many Iranians do feel that their country is being treated differently and unfairly by the international community, led by the West."

 

 

Wikimedia CC

August 25, 2014

"Do Homework Before Supporting Groups in ISIS Fight"

Op-Ed

By Khaled Sheykholeslami and Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"The United States and several key regional states, including Israel, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey may have very different interests, but they all have a shared interest in better understanding and working together to stop groups that dislike Americans as much as Jews, Persians, Shi’as, secular Muslims, and the Saudi monarchy. They should refrain from empowering and expressing blind support for a group or entity without fully understanding it first."

 

 

August 22, 2014

"How an Iran Hawk Lets IS Off the Hook"

Op-Ed, Real Clear Defense

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"Iran...may not have been the United States' best friend in the past three and a half decades, but it remains a legitimate nation-state. It has a political system with a series of checks and balances and some level of accountability and debate. Importantly, Iran can be deterred. Ideology is certainly a driver behind Tehran's decision-making, but its national interests dictate much of its actions. These interests in turn do not always converge with those of the United States, nor do they always conflict."

 

 

Wikimedia CC

August 22, 2014

"Beware of the MEK"

Op-Ed, The National Interest

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"...[T]o understand the origins of anti-Americanism in pre-revolutionary Iran, look no further. The MEK was responsible for the assassination and failed attempts to kidnap and assassinate Americans in Iran in the 1970s. It was also the MEK that pressured the Islamic revolutionaries to take a stronger stance against the United States. The MEK further supported the 1979 U.S. embassy hostage crisis in Tehran."

 

 

June 2014

"Domestic Politics in Iran and a Future Regional Process"

Book Chapter

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

In this chapter, Ariane Tabatabai examines the relationship between changes in Iranian domestic politics and the country's role in regional security in the Middle East. By doing so, she assesses the challenges and opportunities faced by the Iranian government in engaging with the rest of the region, underlining the particular areas of potential cooperation for Iran and key regional actors.

 

 

marjan shiva photo

July 10, 2014

"Five Myths about Iran's Nuclear Program"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"Many states in the region, especially those that have been vocal in their criticism of Iran's nuclear program, feel threatened not by the prospects of a nuclear Iran, but by Iranian-Western rapprochement. Political and economic isolation have helped states like Saudi Arabia, who fear losing their military, economic, and political ties and privileges with the United States. After all, Tehran and Washington did have close relations prior to 1979 and, given that the two countries have a lot in common, they could develop ties again."

 

 

June 5, 2014

"Meeting Iran's Nuclear Fuel Supply Needs"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Dina Esfandiary and Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"Moscow...has a history of manipulating energy supplies for political ends. It used the suspension and threat of suspension of gas supplies to put pressure on its neighbors, including Ukraine. That means it is reasonable for Tehran to have concerns about Russia's trustworthiness as a partner on Bushehr. And unlike some other countries, Iran doesn't have the option of turning to multiple foreign providers, and doesn't believe that it is likely anyone will come to its rescue if Russia doesn't deliver.

 

 

Courtesy of Ariane Tabatabai

Summer 2014

"Building a Network of Young Arms Control Experts"

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

The Middle East Network of Arms Control Specialists (MENACS) aims to bring together young professionals who work on arms control and regional security issues from the Middle East to promote a better understanding of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament in the region, and to facilitate indigenous processes and expertise. The network was the idea of Chen Zak, the Middle East project manager at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, and a former research fellow with the Belfer Center.

 

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