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Ariane Tabatabai

Ariane Tabatabai

Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

 

Experience

Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

Current Affiliation: Visiting Assistant Professor, Security Studies Program, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

 

 

By Date

 

2015

Wikimedia CC 2.0

June 30, 2015

"Interview: Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister Majid Ravanchi"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

A discussion of the state of play in the apparent final days of the Iranian nuclear negotiations and the stumbling blocks remaining on the path toward a final deal

 

 

U.S. State Dept Photo

May 21, 2015

"The Divided Front Negotiating with Iran"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

"The P5+1, as the group has come to be known, is the official party negotiating with Iran, but it can really be divided into two camps. The Western side is composed of the United States and its European partners: France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. China and Russia are the non-Western parties to the talks. Though they all share the goal of preventing a nuclear-armed Iran, each of these actors also has its own agenda. Their respective interests are political, strategic, and economic."

 

 

April 28, 2015

"Why an Iran Deal Won't Lead to Nuclear Proliferation"

Op-Ed, Washington Post, Monkey Cage Blog

By Dina Esfandiary and Ariane Tabatabai, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

"Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Egypt, Jordan and the UAE are all dependent on foreign suppliers and expertise for their programs. They lack the human capacity for the programs. Foreign involvement makes it difficult, though not impossible, to covertly develop a nuclear weapon. This means that suppliers also need to do their due diligence and ensure that buyers use their equipment for purely peaceful purposes."

 

 

April 22, 2015

"Why Nuclear Dominoes Won't Fall in the Middle East"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Dina Esfandiary and Ariane Tabatabai, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

"On their own, civilian nuclear programs do not necessarily imply a military threat. Under the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), member countries are allowed to pursue civilian nuclear programs. Because of a growing energy demand, many countries in the Middle East are exploring nuclear power as part of their energy mix. While some, including the United Arab Emirates, have succeeded in starting civilian nuclear power programs, others face serious financing and technical capacity issues."

 

 

April 16, 2015

"Safety—The Overlooked Crucial Issue in Iranian Nuclear Negotiations"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

"The Middle East's only operating nuclear power plant, Bushehr, is located in Iran's south, close to the Persian Gulf. The rest of the eight reactors Tehran has planned will also be built in the area. This means that any safety breach would not only affect Iran's population, but also have cross-border implications."

 

 

April 14, 2015

The Nuclear Framework Agreement and China-Iran Relations

Media Feature

By Ariane Tabatabai, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014 and Tong Zhao, Former Stanton Nuclear Security Predoctoral Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

Iran and its P5+1 negotiating partners reached a groundbreaking framework agreement on Tehran's nuclear program in early April. In this podcast, Carnegie's Tong Zhao and Ariane Tabatabai discussed the agreement, follow-up talks on technical details, and China's relations with Iran.

 

 

April 11, 2015

"Mission Impossible: Iran Is Too Powerful to Contain"

Op-Ed, The National Interest

By Dina Esfandiary and Ariane Tabatabai, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

"...U.S. and Iranian strategic interests align on some key issues, including the fight against ISIS and the postcombat mission era in Afghanistan....Today, Tehran is the only actor involved that has enough at stake in Iraq to be willing and able to send in ground troops, should the need arise. In Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia was one of three countries to recognize the Taliban as an official government. But Iran has and continues to want the Taliban out of the picture, as does Washington."

 

 

Fars News Agency

April 10, 2015

"The 'Smiling Minister' and the Quds Commander: The Two Faces of Iran"

Op-Ed, The Diplomat

By Ariane Tabatabai, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

"Zarif and Soleimani have little in common. Their background, families, education, the files they handle, and their approaches are different. The cameras capture one's handshakes with the West's foreign ministers in Vienna, Geneva, and Lausanne, and the other talking with fighters in the dusty battlefields of Iraq. But considered together, these two men symbolize Iranian foreign policy more than three decades after the revolution."

 

 

Wikimedia CC 3.0

April 4, 2015

"Don't Fear the Hard-Liners"

Op-Ed, Foreign Policy

By Ariane Tabatabai, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

"...[P]opular support, the ayatollah and the IRGC's cautious endorsements, and Zarif's efforts to set the terms of this round of debate early on mean that hard-line criticism from Tehran will likely be contained to a few scathing editorials, harsh statements, and attempts to undermine the negotiating team — but no major efforts at sabotage. If only Congress were so predictable."

 

 

April 2, 2014

"Is The Iran Nuclear Framework Agreement A Good Deal?"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Nick Robins-Early and Ariane Tabatabai, Former Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2014–2015; Former Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom, 2013–2014

Is the IAEA a strong enough institution to successfully act as a monitor of this deal?

Yes, but the problem is going to be financing. This is a really resource-intensive project. This is two decades of monitoring a number of facilities, and it's going to need a number of people and equipment. It's going to be a resource-intensive process, but that's something that world powers are signing up for, as they'll need to.

 

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