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Ariane Tabatabai

Ariane Tabatabai

Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

Contact:
Email: ariane_tabatabai@hks.harvard.edu

 

Experience

Ariane Tabatabai is an associate in the Belfer Center's International Security Program and Project at Managing the Atom, a visiting assistant professor at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service's Security Studies Program, and a columnist for the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Previously, she was a nonresident research associate with the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies. She was a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the Belfer Center in 2013–2014.

Her work has appeared in the Financial Times, the Boston Globe, the National Interest, Haaretz, Al-Monitor, etc. Her commentary can be found on NPR, BBC, Al-Jazeera, Bloomberg News, etc. She received her Ph.D. in War Studies from King's College London in winter 2015. She holds an M.A. in International Peace and Security with Distinction from King's College London and a double B.A. in Political Science and Cinema and Cultural Studies cum laude from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

 

 

By Date

 

2015

April 16, 2015

"Safety—The Overlooked Crucial Issue in Iranian Nuclear Negotiations"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"The Middle East's only operating nuclear power plant, Bushehr, is located in Iran's south, close to the Persian Gulf. The rest of the eight reactors Tehran has planned will also be built in the area. This means that any safety breach would not only affect Iran's population, but also have cross-border implications."

 

 

April 11, 2015

"Mission Impossible: Iran Is Too Powerful to Contain"

Op-Ed, The National Interest

By Dina Esfandiary and Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"...U.S. and Iranian strategic interests align on some key issues, including the fight against ISIS and the postcombat mission era in Afghanistan....Today, Tehran is the only actor involved that has enough at stake in Iraq to be willing and able to send in ground troops, should the need arise. In Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia was one of three countries to recognize the Taliban as an official government. But Iran has and continues to want the Taliban out of the picture, as does Washington."

 

 

Fars News Agency

April 10, 2015

"The 'Smiling Minister' and the Quds Commander: The Two Faces of Iran"

Op-Ed, The Diplomat

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"Zarif and Soleimani have little in common. Their background, families, education, the files they handle, and their approaches are different. The cameras capture one's handshakes with the West's foreign ministers in Vienna, Geneva, and Lausanne, and the other talking with fighters in the dusty battlefields of Iraq. But considered together, these two men symbolize Iranian foreign policy more than three decades after the revolution."

 

 

Wikimedia CC 3.0

April 4, 2015

"Don't Fear the Hard-Liners"

Op-Ed, Foreign Policy

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"...[P]opular support, the ayatollah and the IRGC's cautious endorsements, and Zarif's efforts to set the terms of this round of debate early on mean that hard-line criticism from Tehran will likely be contained to a few scathing editorials, harsh statements, and attempts to undermine the negotiating team but no major efforts at sabotage. If only Congress were so predictable."

 

 

April 2, 2014

"Is The Iran Nuclear Framework Agreement A Good Deal?"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Nick Robins-Early and Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

Is the IAEA a strong enough institution to successfully act as a monitor of this deal?

Yes, but the problem is going to be financing. This is a really resource-intensive project. This is two decades of monitoring a number of facilities, and it's going to need a number of people and equipment. It's going to be a resource-intensive process, but that's something that world powers are signing up for, as they'll need to.

 

 

April 2, 2015

"Why the Framework Nuclear Agreement with Iran is Good for Both Sides"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"In the following weeks, the agreement will doubtless receive much criticism. Many will claim that one side or the other made too many concessions. But both sides stand to gain from the framework agreement, which should also be considered a victory for the global nonproliferation regime. Ahead of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference that begins in late April, where no major achievements in nonproliferation are likely to be announced, the framework agreement is a very important success."

 

 

March 20, 2015

"Don't Let Fears of a 'Bad' Nuclear Deal with Iran Kill a Good One"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"Some US allies, meanwhile—in particular Saudi Arabia and Israel—object to a deal not so much because of the substance of what's on the table as because it would end the status quo. They fear that Tehran, politically and economically isolated for more than a decade, would resume relations with the West, leading them to lose their privileged place in the region vis-à-vis Washington"

 

 

Wikimedia CC 3.0

March 11, 2015

"Where Does the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps Stand on Nuclear Negotiations?"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"Travelers to Iran are often surprised to see the country's infrastructure. Tehran doesn't look like the capital of a state that has been under sanctions for more than three decades. Its three-level bridges, long underground tunnels, metro, and highways even put some US cities to shame, for which Iranians have the IRGC to thank. The paramilitary organization has turned obstacle into opportunity by becoming a major economic player, picking up business where the private sector hasn't been able to deliver because of sanctions."

 

 

February 13, 2015

"How Iranian Strikes Against Islamic State Have Strengthened Tehran"

Op-Ed, Middle East Eye

By Dina Esfandiary and Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"This campaign aims to reassure Iranians that their government has everything under control, and that the instability in Iraq does not threaten their own security. Iraqi stability is an important concern for Iranians, many of whom remember the devastating Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s. For many, the war confirmed that Iran couldn't count on anyone but itself to ensure the security of its borders."

 

 

www.kremlin.ru

February 13, 2015

"Where Does Iran's Supreme Leader Really Stand on Nuclear Negotiations?"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Ariane Tabatabai, Associate, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

"Khamenei is arguably the single most important voice on Iran's nuclear program.... But his latest speech is yet another ringing endorsement of the Rouhani government's nuclear policy. His support for Zarif's negotiating team in particular is stronger than ever and comes at a time when, according to the team itself, the talks are at their most fragile and sensitive stage."

 

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