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Alan Kuperman

Alan Kuperman

Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2000–2001

 

Experience

Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2000–2001

Current Affiliation: Associate Professor of Public Affairs, LBJ School of Public Affairs, University of Texas, Austin, Austin, Texas

 

 

By Date

 

2013

AP Photo/ Kevin Frayer

September 2013

"Lessons from Libya: How Not to Intervene"

Policy Brief

By Alan Kuperman, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2000–2001

"The biggest misconception about NATO's intervention is that it saved lives and benefited Libya and its neighbors. In reality, when NATO intervened in mid-March 2011, Qaddafi already had regained control of most of Libya, while the rebels were retreating rapidly toward Egypt. Thus, the conflict was about to end, barely six weeks after it started, at a toll of about 1,000 dead, including soldiers, rebels, and civilians caught in the crossfire. By intervening, NATO enabled the rebels to resume their attack, which prolonged the war for another seven months and caused at least 7,000 more deaths."

 

 

Magharebia Photo CC

Summer 2013

"A Model Humanitarian Intervention? Reassessing NATO's Libya Campaign"

Journal Article, issue 1, volume 38

By Alan Kuperman, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2000–2001

NATO's 2011 humanitarian military intervention in Libya has been hailed as a model for implementing the emerging norm of the responsibility to protect (R2P), on grounds that it prevented an impending bloodbath in Benghazi and facilitated the ouster of Libya's oppressive ruler, Muammar al-Qaddafi, who had targeted peaceful civil protesters. Before the international community embraces such conclusions, however, a more rigorous assessment of the net humanitarian impact of NATO intervention in Libya is warranted.

 

2006

2006

Gambling on Humanitarian Intervention: Moral Hazard, Rebellion and Civil War

Book

By Timothy Crawford, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2006-2009 and Alan Kuperman, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2000–2001

This volume explores whether the emerging norm of intervention has backfired by exacerbating violence in conflicts such as Kosovo, leading to the unnecessary deaths and ethnic cleansing of innocent civilians.

 

 

October 4, 2006

Introduction: Debating the Hazards of Intervention

Book Chapter

By Alan Kuperman, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2000–2001 and Timothy Crawford, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2006-2009

 

 

October 4, 2006

Suicidal Rebellions and the Moral Hazard of Humanitarian Intervention

Book Chapter

By Alan Kuperman, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2000–2001

 

No Date

The Limits of Humanitarian Intervention: Genocide in Rwanda

Book

By Alan Kuperman, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2000–2001

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.