Belfer Center Home > Experts > Joseph S. Nye

« Back to Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2006 (continued)

July / August 2006

Transformational Leadership and U.S. Grand Strategy

Journal Article, Foreign Affairs, issue 4, volume 85

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

 

April 19, 2006

Assessing China's Power

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

 

April 11, 2006

America Must Be Pragmatic with Putin

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

 

April 9, 2006

Fear of Chinese Guns: The Best Defense is Not to Offer Any Offense

Op-Ed, San Francisco Chronicle

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

 

April 5, 2006

Gorbachev and the End of the Cold War

Op-Ed, New Straits Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

 

February 27, 2006

The Wrong Way of Thinking about Oil

Op-Ed, The Korea Herald

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

 

February 10, 2006

America's Thirst for Oil

Op-Ed, Chicago Tribune

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

 

January 23, 2006

"The Chimera of Russia's Gas Power"

Op-Ed, Yemen Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"If Russia is going to throw its weight around, it is better to have allies among those affected. The key to energy security is diversity — of pipelines as well as sources of supply."

 

2005

December 29, 2005

"The Rise of China's Soft Power"

Op-Ed, Wall Street Journal Asia

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"In terms of political values, the era of Maoism (and Mao jackets) is long past. Although China remains authoritarian, the success of its political economy in tripling gross domestic product over the past three decades has made it attractive to many developing countries. In parts of Asia, Africa and Latin America, the so-called "Beijing consensus" on authoritarian government plus a market economy has become more popular than the previously dominant "Washington consensus" of market economics with democratic government. China has reinforced this attraction by economic aid and access to its growing market."

 

 

December 20, 2005

In a Quandary over Withdrawal Countdown

Op-Ed, The Bangkok Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

SUBSCRIBE

Receive email updates on the most pressing topics in science and int'l affairs.

Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Russian President†Mikhail Gorbachev.