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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2015 (continued)

October 1, 2015

"The World Needs an Arms-control Treaty for Cybersecurity"

Op-Ed, The Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[I]t is worth remembering that the first nuclear-arms control agreements — the Test Ban Treaty of 1963 and the Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968 — did not solve all of the problems of controlling nuclear weapons. Rather, they started a process. Perhaps Obama and Xi's modest beginning will do something similar."

 

 

September 24, 2015

"The American Century: RIP?"

Op-Ed, The National Interest

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"If we define 'the American century' as the period since World War II when the United States—without full control—became the central actor in the global balance of power, that is likely to remain true in 2041, the centennial of when Henry Luce first proclaimed the term."

 

 

Creative Commons

September 8, 2015

"How to Fight the Islamic State"

Op-Ed, Project Syndicate

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[T]he boots on the ground must be Sunni. The presence of foreign or Shia troops reinforces the Islamic State's claim of being surrounded and challenged by infidels. So far, thanks largely to effective Kurdish forces, who are overwhelmingly Sunni, the Islamic State has lost some 30% of the territory it held a year ago. But deploying additional Sunni infantry requires training, support, and time, as well as pressure on Iraq's Shia-dominated central government to temper its sectarian approach"

 

 

August 20, 2015

"We Asked Joseph Nye: What Should Be the Purpose of American Power?"

Op-Ed, The National Interest

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Military force will remain a crucial component of American power, but it is not sufficient. An American strategy that holds the military balance in Europe or East Asia while maintaining alliances is a crucial source of influence, but trying to occupy and control the internal politics of nationalistic populations in the Middle East revolutions is futile."

 

 

State Dept Photo

August 17, 2015

"Great Democracies' New Harmony"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"It would be a mistake to cast the prospects for an improved US-India relationship solely in terms of China's rising power. Indian economic success is an American interest on its own. So is the open approach taken by India and Brazil on issues such as governance of the Internet, at a time when Russia and China are seeking more authoritarian control."

 

 

August 9, 2015

"Reinstating Soft Power into US Foreign Policy"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Consciously or not, the first Bush administration chose the right path when it decided against moving farther into Iraq. It remains a lesson to remember today: Trying to occupy and control the internal politics of nationalistic populations in the Middle East revolutions is a recipe for failure."

 

 

July 10, 2015

"The Limits of Chinese Soft Power"

Op-Ed, Today's Zaman

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The other limit is China reluctance to take full advantage of an uncensored civil society. As noted by the Economist, the Chinese Communist Party has not bought into the idea that soft power springs largely from individuals, the private sector, and civil society. Instead, it has clung to the view that the government is the main source of soft power, promoting ancient cultural icons that it thinks might have global appeal, often using the tools of propaganda."

 

 

June 22, 2015

"China Is Not More Economically Powerful Than the U.S., and It Is Far From Certain If and When It Will Be"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"In an interdependent relationship, power depends on asymmetries in the interdependence, and China depends heavily on access to the American market. Dumping dollars would be self-destructive. In 2009, some Peoples Liberation Army officials suggested that China use its dollar reserves to punish the United States for its arms sales to Taiwan, but economic officials quickly pointed out that this would impose intolerable damage on their own economy."

 

 

June 12, 2015

"A Key to America's Power"

Op-Ed, CNN.com

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Population alone does not determine national power, but it is an important component, particularly if those human resources are educated and assimilated. It is encouraging, therefore, that the United States is one of the few developed countries that is projected to avoid demographic decline and keep its share of world population, partly as a result of immigration."

 

 

June 3, 2015

"Is U.S.-China Conflict Imminent in the South China Sea?"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The U.S. argues that UNCLOS grants foreign ships and planes free access beyond a 12-mile territorial limit, while China claims that military flights cannot cross its 200-mile economic zone without its permission. If China claimed such a zone for each of the sites it occupies, it could close off most of the South China Sea."

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.