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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2009 (continued)

AP Photo

April 13, 2009

"Scholars on the Sidelines"

Op-Ed, The Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Some academics say that while the growing gap between theory and policy may have costs for policy, it has produced better social science theory, and that this is more important than whether such scholarship is relevant. Also, to some extent, the gap is an inevitable result of the growth and specialization of knowledge. Few people can keep up with their subfields, much less all of social science. But the danger is that academic theorizing will say more and more about less and less....The solutions must come via a reappraisal within the academy itself. Departments should give greater weight to real-world relevance and impact in hiring and promoting young scholars. Journals could place greater weight on relevance in evaluating submissions. Studies of specific regions deserve more attention. Universities could facilitate interest in the world by giving junior faculty members greater incentives to participate in it. That should include greater toleration of unpopular policy positions...."

 

 

AP Photo

April 13, 2009

"Which Globalization Will Survive?"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The world economy will shrink this year for the first time since 1945, and some economists worry that the current crisis could spell the beginning of the end of globalization....Globalization has several dimensions, and, though economists all too often portray it and the world economy as being one and the same, other forms of globalization also have significant effects — not all of them benign — on our daily lives."

 

 

AP Photo

March 10, 2009

"Networked Leaders"

Op-Ed, Guatemala Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"While Obama was hardly the first American politician to use the Internet, he was the most effective in using new technology to raise money from small donors, energize and coordinate volunteers, and convey his messages directly to voters. Now he is faced with the question of how to use networks to govern....In a networked world, leadership is more like being in the middle of the circle and attracting others than being "king of the mountain" and issuing orders to subordinates down below."

 

 

AP Photo

February 11, 2009

"How Obama Leads"

Op-Ed, Daily Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Obama inherits a global economic crisis, two wars in which US and allied troops are deployed, crises in the Middle East and South Asia, and a struggle against terrorism. He will have to deal with this legacy and chart a new course at the same time

 

 

AP Photo

January 21, 2009

"The U.S. Can Reclaim 'Smart Power'"

Op-Ed, Los Angeles Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Obama faces a difficult international environment, but previous presidents have managed to employ hard, soft and smart power in equally difficult contexts. In 1970, during the Vietnam War, America was viewed as unattractive in many parts of the world, but with changed policies and the passage of time, the United States managed to recover its soft power. It can happen again."

 

 

AP Photo

January 11, 2009

"The Dark Side of Self-Determination"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Self-determination has turned out to be an ambiguous moral principle. Woodrow Wilson thought it would solve problems in central Europe in 1919, but it created as many as it solved. Adolf Hitler used the principle to undermine fragile states in the 1930's. Today, with less than 10% of the world's states being homogeneous, treating self-determination as a primary moral principle could have disastrous consequences in many regions."

 

2008

AP Photo

December 23, 2008

"Obama Meets the World"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Many people will try to set President Barack Obama's priorities, but one person is sure to have a major effect. George W. Bush has bequeathed an unenviable legacy: an economic crisis, two wars, a struggle against terrorism, and problems across the Middle East and elsewhere. If Obama fails to fight these fires successfully, they will consume his political capital, but if all he does is fight them, he will inherit Bush's priorities. The new president must deal with the past and chart a new future at the same time."

 

 

AP Photo

December 14, 2008

"Cyber Insecurity"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"In today's interconnected world, an unidentified cyber attack on non-governmental infrastructure might be severely damaging. For example, some experts believe that a nation's electric power grid may be particularly susceptible. The control systems that electric power companies use are thought vulnerable to attack, which could shut down cities and regions for days or weeks. Cyber attacks may also interfere with financial markets and cause immense economic loss by closing down commercial websites."

 

 

AP Photo

November 7, 2008

"America Needs a New Style of Leadership: It's Time to Retire the 'Big Man,' Heroic Warrior Model of Leadership"

Op-Ed, U.S. News and World Report

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Smart warriors, however, know how to lead with more than just the use of force. As Gen. David Petraeus demonstrated in Iraq, hearts and minds also matter, and smart warriors need the soft power of attraction as well as the hard power of coercion. Indeed, an oversimplified image of warrior-style leadership in President Bush's first term caused costly setbacks for America's role in the world. It is not a manly modern Achilles or the strongest alpha male who makes the best warrior leader in today's communication age. Military leadership today requires political and managerial skills...."

 

 

AP Photo

November 7, 2008

"The New President and the Future of American Power"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The challenge for Barack Obama is that more and more issues and problems are outside the control of even the most powerful state. Although the US does well on the traditional measures of power, those measures increasingly fail to capture much of what defines world politics, which, owing to the information revolution and globalization, is changing in a way that prevents Americans from achieving all their international goals by acting alone....As the world's largest economy, American leadership will remain crucial. The problem of American power in the wake of the financial crisis is not one of decline, but of a realization that even the most powerful country cannot achieve its aims without the help of others. Fortunately, Barack Obama understands that."

 
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We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.