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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2009 (continued)

AP Photo

July 14, 2009

"Will US-Japan Alliance Survive?"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[T]he U.S.-Japan alliance will have to face a new set of transnational challenges to our vital interests, such as pandemics, terrorism, and human outflows from failed states. Chief among these challenges is the threat posed by global warming, with China having surpassed the U.S. as the leading producer of carbon-dioxide emissions (though not in per capita terms)."

 

 

AP Photo

July 6, 2009

"On Robert McNamara"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...I assign the Errol Morris film The Fog of War to my students in a course about leadership and ethics in foreign policy. What the film shows is a man who belatedly realized his frailties and decided to warn a younger generation not to repeat his mistakes. Many former policy makers spend their time after office trying to cast their actions in the best possible light for history. Bob was a rare exception in exposing his mistakes...."

 

 

AP Photo

June 25, 2009

"Joseph Nye's Testimony from Hearings on 'Japan's Changing Role'"

Testimony

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Joseph S. Nye testified before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs' Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific and the Global Environment on "Japan's Changing Role" on June 25, 2009.

 

 

AP Photo

June 12, 2009

"How Do You Teach and Learn Successful Leadership in a Democracy?"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"[W]hatever the failures of particular British legislators, the issues go further than merely allowing voters to "throw the rascals out." There is also a question of how successful leadership is taught and learned in a democracy. A successful democracy requires leadership to be widespread throughout government and civil society. Citizens who express concern about leadership need to learn not only how to judge it, but how to practice it themselves."

 

 

AP Photo

June 2, 2009

"Nature and Nurture in Leadership"

Op-Ed, Harvard Crimson

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Societies that rest on heroic leaders are not able to develop the civil society and broad social capital that are necessary for leading in today's networked world. Modern leadership turns out to be less about who you are, or how you were born than about what you have learned and what you do as part of a group. Nature and nurture intertwine, but nurture is much more important in the modern world than the heroic paradigm gives it credit for. Rather than think of your fellow graduates in terms of a particular type of heroic individual—male or female—look instead for indications that they (and you) have developed the judgment to broaden your bandwidth and cope with the wide range of new situations you are bound to encounter. That contextual intelligence will be the key to effective leadership."

 

 

AP Photo

May 13, 2009

"Taking Democracy to the People"

Op-Ed, Globe and Mail

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Equally important to the foreign-policy methods used to support democracy abroad are the ways in which it is practised in the United States. When Americans try to impose democracy, they tarnish it. When they live up to their own best traditions, they can stimulate emulation and create the soft power of attraction. This is what Ronald Reagan called the 'shining city on the hill.'"

 

 

AP Photo

April 13, 2009

"Scholars on the Sidelines"

Op-Ed, The Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Some academics say that while the growing gap between theory and policy may have costs for policy, it has produced better social science theory, and that this is more important than whether such scholarship is relevant. Also, to some extent, the gap is an inevitable result of the growth and specialization of knowledge. Few people can keep up with their subfields, much less all of social science. But the danger is that academic theorizing will say more and more about less and less....The solutions must come via a reappraisal within the academy itself. Departments should give greater weight to real-world relevance and impact in hiring and promoting young scholars. Journals could place greater weight on relevance in evaluating submissions. Studies of specific regions deserve more attention. Universities could facilitate interest in the world by giving junior faculty members greater incentives to participate in it. That should include greater toleration of unpopular policy positions...."

 

 

AP Photo

April 13, 2009

"Which Globalization Will Survive?"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The world economy will shrink this year for the first time since 1945, and some economists worry that the current crisis could spell the beginning of the end of globalization....Globalization has several dimensions, and, though economists all too often portray it and the world economy as being one and the same, other forms of globalization also have significant effects — not all of them benign — on our daily lives."

 

 

AP Photo

March 10, 2009

"Networked Leaders"

Op-Ed, Guatemala Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"While Obama was hardly the first American politician to use the Internet, he was the most effective in using new technology to raise money from small donors, energize and coordinate volunteers, and convey his messages directly to voters. Now he is faced with the question of how to use networks to govern....In a networked world, leadership is more like being in the middle of the circle and attracting others than being "king of the mountain" and issuing orders to subordinates down below."

 

 

AP Photo

February 11, 2009

"How Obama Leads"

Op-Ed, Daily Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Obama inherits a global economic crisis, two wars in which US and allied troops are deployed, crises in the Middle East and South Asia, and a struggle against terrorism. He will have to deal with this legacy and chart a new course at the same time

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.