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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2013 (continued)

August 26, 2013

"By Way of Power"

Op-Ed, Mark News

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"As for the perceived loss of America's much-vaunted superpower status, we simply need to come to terms with the changing reality of international relations, and accept that the United States will have to work with others to achieve its global aims. The changes of a global information age mean that even the world's only superpower can't go it alone."

 

 

August 12, 2013

"Surveillance and American Liberty"

Op-Ed, Today's Zaman

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"American policy is not to steal intellectual property, while China's policy appears to be the opposite. At the same time, both governments constantly hack into each other's computers to steal traditional political and military secrets. Spying is not a violation of international law (though it often violates various domestic laws), but the US argues that theft of intellectual property violates both the spirit and letter of international trade agreements."

 

 

AP Photo

July 24, 2013

"The Infant Prince George is a Source of Real-world Power"

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Promoting attractive images of one's country is not new but the conditions for trying to create soft power have changed dramatically in recent decades. For one thing, nearly half the countries in the world are now democracies. In such circumstances, diplomacy aimed at public opinion can become as important to outcomes as the traditional classified diplomatic communications among leaders. Information creates power, and today a much larger part of the world's population has access to that power."

 

 

Wikimedia Commons

July 15, 2013

"North Korea's Powerful Weakness Over China"

Op-Ed, Moscow Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"China was sincere in expressing its desire for a non-nuclear Korean Peninsula, but the nuclear issue was not its primary concern. It also sought to prevent the collapse of the North Korean regime and the resulting potential for chaos on its border — not only flows of refugees, but also the possibility that South Korean or U.S. troops could move into North Korea."

 

 

July 1, 2013

"Conversation with Joseph Nye, Former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense"

Media Feature

By Chris Riback and Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"As we consider our incredible range of urgent international and defense affairs — challenges with our deepest Intelligence Gathering secrets revealed, China, Russia, North Korea, Syria, Iran — all while coordinating a military exit from Afghanistan, a question: How much does Presidential Leadership matter?"

 

 

June 28, 2013

"American Power in the 21st Century Will Be Defined by the 'Rise of the Rest'"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The power resources of many states and non-state actors will rise in the coming years. U.S. presidents will face an increasing number of issues in which obtaining our preferred outcomes will require power with others as much as power over others. Our leaders' capacity to maintain alliances and create networks will be an important dimension of our hard and soft power."

 

 

June 24, 2013

"Good Leaders Don't Always Need a Vision"

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Two centuries ago the newly independent American colonists had a transformational leader in George Washington. Then, they invented a different type of leadership when James Madison and other transactional leaders negotiated the US constitution. Madison's solution to the problem of conflict and faction was not to try to convert everyone to a common cause but to overcome division by creating an institutional framework in which ambition countered ambition and faction countered faction. Separation of powers, checks and balances, and a decentralised federal system placed the emphasis on laws more than leaders."

 

 

June 18, 2013

"How World Leaders Become Foreign Policy Aces"

Op-Ed, Moscow Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Contextual intelligence implies both a capability to discern trends in the face of complexity and adaptability while trying to shape events. Bismarck once referred to this skill as the ability to intuit God's movements in history and seize the hem of His garment as He sweeps past. More prosaically, leaders with contextual intelligence, like surfers, have the ability to judge and adjust to new waves and ride them successfully."

 

 

White House Photo

June 12, 2013

"A Smarter Way to Deal with China"

Op-Ed, Los Angeles Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"In meeting many of the new transnational challenges, the U.S. has to get away from thinking just about power over others and think about power with others. We do not want to become so fearful that we are not able to find ways to cooperate with China."

 

 

May 21, 2013

"Is the Vision Thing Important?"

Op-Ed, The New York Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[P]residents matter, but not exactly in the ways that leadership experts predict. Their expectation that transformational leaders make all the difference and incremental or transactional leaders are simply routine managers greatly oversimplifies the role of leadership."

 

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