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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

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Japanese Wikipedia

December 3, 2013

"The Return of Japan After 20 Years of Stagnation"

Op-Ed, Moscow Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"A quick resolution of the Senkaku Islands dispute, or of Japan's lower-profile conflict with South Korea over the Korean-controlled Liancourt Rocks, is improbable, but Japan could be more proactive. For example, by stating their willingness to take any territorial disputes to the International Court of Justice, Japanese authorities could help to dispel perceptions of militarism."

 

 

August 30, 2013

"Arab Revolutions Pose"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The big problem in foreign policy is the complexity of context. One has to understand not only international and transnational systems but also the intricacies of domestic politics in multiple societies. This complexity gives special relevance to Aristotle's virtue of prudence — avoiding excess or deficiency. We live in a world of diverse cultures and know very little about social engineering and how to 'build nations.' That is particularly true with regard to revolutions."

 

 

June 24, 2013

"Good Leaders Don't Always Need a Vision"

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Two centuries ago the newly independent American colonists had a transformational leader in George Washington. Then, they invented a different type of leadership when James Madison and other transactional leaders negotiated the US constitution. Madison's solution to the problem of conflict and faction was not to try to convert everyone to a common cause but to overcome division by creating an institutional framework in which ambition countered ambition and faction countered faction. Separation of powers, checks and balances, and a decentralised federal system placed the emphasis on laws more than leaders."

 

 

June 18, 2013

"How World Leaders Become Foreign Policy Aces"

Op-Ed, Moscow Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Contextual intelligence implies both a capability to discern trends in the face of complexity and adaptability while trying to shape events. Bismarck once referred to this skill as the ability to intuit God's movements in history and seize the hem of His garment as He sweeps past. More prosaically, leaders with contextual intelligence, like surfers, have the ability to judge and adjust to new waves and ride them successfully."

 

 

May 21, 2013

"Is the Vision Thing Important?"

Op-Ed, The New York Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[P]residents matter, but not exactly in the ways that leadership experts predict. Their expectation that transformational leaders make all the difference and incremental or transactional leaders are simply routine managers greatly oversimplifies the role of leadership."

 

 

AP Photo

May 21, 2013

"Obama Can Still Build 2nd Term Legacy"

Op-Ed, CNN.com

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Obama's first term was marked by the passage of health care legislation — unpopular with some, but a historic accomplishment that Democratic presidents have sought since the days of Harry Truman. The Democrats' loss of the House of Representatives in the 2010 elections has constrained Obama's ability to advance other transformational efforts on the domestic front, though some believe that, out of self-interest, the Republican Party may still allow bipartisan reform of immigration law during Obama's second term."

 

 

March/April 2013

"Our Pacific Predicament"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, American Interest, issue 4, volume 8

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"American interests rest on stability in the region to allow the continuing growth of trade and investment that benefits all countries. The U.S.-Japan alliance remains crucial to stability in East Asia, but so too are good relations in all three sides of the strategic triangle. One thing is clear: If, despite all we do, Sino-Japanese relations deteriorate toward literal conflict, the United States will be faced with some very tough choices."

 

 

March 13, 2013

"History Will Judge Bush on Iraq War"

Op-Ed, China Daily

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Truman biographer David McCullough warns that about 50 years must pass before historians can really appraise a presidency. But one decade after Truman left office, the Marshall Plan and the NATO alliance were already seen as solid accomplishments. Bush lacks comparable successes to compensate for his mismanagement of Iraq."

 

 

March 4, 2013

"A New Great Power Relationship"

Op-Ed, China Daily

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[T]he United States has accepted the rise of Chinese power and invited Chinese participation as a responsible stakeholder in the international system. Power is not always a zero sum game. Given the global problems that both China and the United States will face, they have much more to gain from working together than in allowing overwrought fears to drive them apart, but it will take wise policy on both sides to assure this future."

 

 

January 25, 2013

"Work With China, Don't Contain It"

Op-Ed, The New York Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"But America's rebalancing toward Asia should not be aggressive. We should heed Mr. Kennan's warning against overmilitarization and ensure that China doesn't feel encircled or endangered. The world's two largest economies have much to gain from cooperation on fighting climate change, pandemics, cyberterrorism and nuclear proliferation."

 

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