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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

Globalization (continued)

AP Photo

November/December 2010

"The Future of American Power"

Journal Article, Foreign Affairs

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

It is currently fashionable to predict a decline in the United States' power. But the United States is not in absolute decline, and in relative terms, there is a reasonable probability that it will remain more powerful than any other state in the coming decades.

 

 

AP Photo

November 22, 2010

"Japan's Options"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The main danger for Japan today is a tendency to turn inward, rather than becoming a global civilian power that realizes its great potential to produce global public goods. For example, Japan's aid budget has declined, and only half as many Japanese students study overseas as did two decades ago. An inward-looking Japan would be a loss for the entire world."

 

 

AP Photo

October 14, 2010

"The Future of Power"

Op-Ed, The Korea Herald

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Much of the work of global governance will rely on formal and informal networks. Network organizations (such as the G20) are used for setting agendas, building consensus, coordinating policy, exchanging knowledge and establishing norms....To cope with transnational challenges, the international community will have to continue to develop a series of complementary networks and institutions to supplement the U.N. But if major countries are divided, it is unlikely that even networks like the G20 can set the agenda."

 

 

AP Photo

October 4, 2010

"The Pros and Cons of Citizen Diplomacy"

Op-Ed, The New York Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[T]he goals and messages of civil-society actors are often not aligned with government policies. This gives rise to the paradox of using citizen diplomacy in a global information age — decentralization and diminished control may be central to the creation of soft power, but in an age where every phone is a camera and every computer is a photo shop, the obscure pastor of a small Florida church can also wreak havoc and destroy soft power by threatening to burn a Koran. In a democracy, such risk is unavoidable, and the best response may be the type of national conversation that eventually dissuaded the unruly pastor."

 

 

AP Photo

August 19, 2010

"The Closing of America's Borders May Close American Minds"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Today the US is the world's third most populous country; 50 years from now it is still likely to be third (after only China and India). Not only is immigration relevant to economic power, but, given that nearly all developed countries are aging and face a burden of providing for older generations, it could help reduce the sharpness of the policy problem."

 

 

AP Photo

August 11, 2010

"Tide to be Harnessed"

Op-Ed, Boston Herald

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"If the U.S. turned inward and seriously curtailed immigration, there would be consequences for America's position in the world. With its levels of immigration, America is one of the few developed countries that may avoid demographic decline and keep its share of world population, but this might change if reactions to terrorist events or xenophobia closed the borders."

 

 

AP Photo

June 14, 2010

"The Future of Europe"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The EU's approach to sharing power, hammering out agreements, and resolving conflict by multiple committees can be frustrating and lacks drama, but it is increasingly relevant for many issues in a networked and interdependent world....In terms of economic power, Europe has the world's largest market, and represents 17 percent of world trade, compared to 12 percent for the U.S. Europe also dispenses half of the world's foreign assistance, compared to 20 percent for the U.S. But all this potential strength may be to no avail if Europeans do not solve the immediate problems stemming from financial markets' loss of confidence in the euro."

 

 

May 2010

"Cyber Power"

Paper

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Power depends upon context, and the rapid growth of cyber space is an important new context in world politics. The low price of entry, anonymity, and asymmetries in vulnerability means that smaller actors have more capacity to exercise hard and soft power in cyberspace than in many more traditional domains of world politics. The largest powers are unlikely to be able to dominate this domain as much as they have others like sea or air. But cyberspace also illustrates the point that diffusion of power does not mean equality of power or the replacement of governments as the most powerful actors in world politics.

 

 

AP Photo

February 15, 2010

"Smart Power Needs Smart Public Diplomacy"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[E]ven the best advertising cannot sell an unpopular product. A communications strategy cannot work if it cuts against the grain of policy. Actions speak louder than words. All too often, policymakers treat public diplomacy as a bandage that can be applied after damage is done by other instruments. For example, China tried to enhance its soft power by successfully staging the 2008 Olympics, but its simultaneous domestic crackdown in Tibet — and subsequent repression in Xinxiang and arrests of human rights lawyers — undercut its gains."

 

 

AP Photo

November 9, 2009

"Who Caused the End of the Cold War?"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Ultimately the deepest causes of Soviet collapse were the decline of communist ideology and the failure of the Soviet economy. This would have happened even without Gorbachev. In the early Cold War, communism and the Soviet Union had a good deal of soft power. Many communists had led the resistance against fascism in Europe, and many people believed that communism was the wave of the future....Although in theory communism aimed to instill a system of class justice, Lenin's heirs maintained domestic power through a brutal state security system involving lethal purges, gulags, broad censorship, and the use of informants. The net effect of these repressive measures was a general loss of faith in the system."

 

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