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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

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Spring 2011

"The Future of Power"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, issue 3, volume LXIV

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Jack L. Goldsmith

"The conventional wisdom among those who looked at the Middle East used to be that you had a choice either of supporting the autocrat or being stuck with the religious extremists. The extraordinary diffusion of information created in Egypt and other Middle Eastern countries reveals a strong middle that we weren't fully aware of. What is more, new technologies allow this new middle to coordinate in ways unseen before Twitter, Facebook, and so forth, and this could lead to a very different politics of the Middle East. This introduces a new complexity to our government's dealings with the region."

 

 

AP Photo

July 4, 2011

"Should China Be 'Contained'?"

Op-Ed, CNN.com

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Such fears appear exaggerated, particularly when one considers that Asia is not one entity. It has its own internal balance of power. Japan, India, Vietnam, and other countries do not want to be dominated by China, and thus welcome a U.S. presence in the region."

 

 

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June 9, 2011

"Syria Can Prove that Sanctions Do Work"

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"As the death toll in Syria approached 1,000, President Barack Obama finally announced sanctions against the regime. His move stopped Americans doing business with President Bashar al-Assad, along with certain relatives and officials, and froze their US assets. Cynics scoffed, repeating the conventional wisdom that sanctions don't work. In fact they can make a big difference and, with Syrian violence worsening, the time is right for more."

 

 

AP Photo

June 6, 2011

"Has Economic Power Replaced Military Might?"

Op-Ed, CNN.com

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Markets and economic power rest upon political frameworks, which in turn depend not only upon norms, institutions, and relationships, but also upon the management of coercive power. A well-ordered modern state is one that holds a monopoly on the legitimate use of force, and that allows domestic markets to operate. Internationally, where order is more tenuous, residual concerns about the coercive use of force, even if a low probability, can have important effects ó including a stabilizing effect."

 

 

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May 9, 2011

"American Power after Bin Laden"

Op-Ed, The Korea Herald

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[P]ossession of power resources does not always imply that one can get the outcomes one prefers. Even the recent death of Osama bin Laden at the hands of United States special forces does not indicate anything about American power one way or the other."

 

 

AP Photo

February 14, 2011

"The Misleading Metaphor of Decline"

Op-Ed, Wall Street Journal

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...American power is based on alliances rather than colonies, and it is associated with an ideology that is flexible and to which America can return even after it has overextended itself. Looking to the future, Anne-Marie Slaughter of Princeton argues that America's culture of openness and innovation will keep it central in an information age when networks supplement, if not fully replace, hierarchical power."

 

 

AP Photo

February 7, 2011

"The Reality of Virtual Power"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...Obama and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have issued public as well as private appeals for reform and change in Egypt and the wider Arab world, while also urging limits to violence by all parties. Moreover, they have aligned themselves with freedom of information in the face of efforts by the Egyptian regime to block Internet access."

 

 

February 1, 2011

The Future of Power

Book

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

The influential policy thinker who coined the term "soft power" examines the changing nature of power since the Cold War, the new ways in which it is exercised, and how those changes impact America's role in the world.

 

 

AP Photo

November/December 2010

"The Future of American Power"

Journal Article, Foreign Affairs

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

It is currently fashionable to predict a decline in the United States' power. But the United States is not in absolute decline, and in relative terms, there is a reasonable probability that it will remain more powerful than any other state in the coming decades.

 

 

AP Photo

November 22, 2010

"Japan's Options"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The main danger for Japan today is a tendency to turn inward, rather than becoming a global civilian power that realizes its great potential to produce global public goods. For example, Japan's aid budget has declined, and only half as many Japanese students study overseas as did two decades ago. An inward-looking Japan would be a loss for the entire world."

 

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