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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

United Nations (continued)

March 11, 2003

"Europe is too Powerful to be Ignored"

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"From the coal and steel  community created after the second world war to today's European Union, Franco-German co-operation has created something unique in world   history. The union is not a new nation state with a mighty army. The  Europeans are not all in the same sovereign boat but the national boats are lashed together into an island of stability that is sui generis and  powerfully attractive to its neighbours. Witness the desire of central  Europeans and Turkey to join it."

 

 

Summer 1986

The Owls' Agenda for Avoiding Nuclear War

Journal Article, Washington Quarterly

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor, Albert Carnesale, Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School

The debate over national security and arms control has focused primarily on weapons: more or fewer weapons, different kinds of weapons. During the 1984 presidential campaign, for example, President Ronald Reagan defended his administration's military buildup, the biggest in peacetime. Former Vice President Walter Mondale advocated a freeze on deploying new weapons. Numbers and types of arms have preoccupied governments and specialists on both the right and the left.

 

August 20, 2015

"We Asked Joseph Nye: What Should Be the Purpose of American Power?"

Op-Ed, The National Interest

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Military force will remain a crucial component of American power, but it is not sufficient. An American strategy that holds the military balance in Europe or East Asia while maintaining alliances is a crucial source of influence, but trying to occupy and control the internal politics of nationalistic populations in the Middle East revolutions is futile."

 

 

July 16, 2014

"Europe Doesn't Necessarily Have to Lose from China's Rise"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Though China is not attempting to upend the global order, it is now undergoing a profound — and destabilizing — transformation. With the rise of transnational issues such as climate change, terrorism, pandemics, and cyber crime — brought about by rapid technological progress and social change — power is being diffused not among states, but among a wide range of non-governmental entities. Addressing these challenges will require broad international cooperation, with China, the U.S., and Europe each playing an important role."

 

 

Jerry Michalski Photo

December 13, 2013

"Governance in the Information Age"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The WEF's Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government...has considered ways in which information technology can improve governance and reduce feelings of alienation among the governed. The most effective initiatives, the council observed, often arise from partnerships between government and the private sector."

 

 

January 10, 2013

"The World in 2030"

Op-Ed, Social Europe Journal

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The question of America's role in helping to produce a more benign world in 2030 has important implications for President Barack Obama as he approaches his second term. The world faces a new set of transnational challenges, including climate change, transnational terrorism, cyber insecurity, and pandemics. All of these issues require cooperation to resolve."

 

 

December 16, 2012

"Immigration and American Power"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"While too rapid a rate of immigration can cause social problems, over the long term, immigration strengthens U.S. power. It is estimated that at least 83 countries and territories currently have fertility rates that are below the level needed to keep their population constant. Whereas most developed countries will experience a shortage of people as the century progresses, America is one of the few that may avoid demographic decline and maintain its share of world population."

 

 

August 2012

The U.S.-Japan Alliance: Anchoring Stability in Asia

Report

By Richard Armitage and Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

The following report presents a consensus view of the members of a bipartisan study group on the U.S.-Japan alliance. The report specifically addresses energy, economics and global trade, relations with neighbors, and security-related issues. Within these areas, the study group offers policy recommendations for Japan and the United States, which span near- and long-term time frames. These recommendations are intended to bolster the alliance as a force for peace, stability, and prosperity in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond.

 

 

March 2012

"The Twenty-First Century Will Not Be a 'Post-American' World"

Journal Article, International Studies Quarterly, issue 1, volume 56

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"After the collapse of Cold War bipolarity, power in the global information age became distributed in a pattern that resembles a complex three-dimensional chess game. On the top chessboard, military power is largely unipolar, and the United States is likely to retain primacy for quite some time. But on the middle chessboard, economic power has been multi-polar for more than a decade...with the United States, Europe, Japan, and China as the major players, and others gaining in importance. The bottom chessboard is the realm of transnational relations that cross borders outside of government control. It includes nonstate actors as diverse as bankers electronically transferring funds, terrorists transferring weapons, hackers threatening cyber-security, and threats such as pandemics and climate change. On this bottom board, power is widely diffused, and it makes no sense to speak of unipolarity, multipolarity, or hegemony."

 

 

AP Photo

February 18, 2012

"Yes, the World Would Be More Peaceful with Women in Charge"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Margaret Thatcher, Golda Meir and Indira Gandhi were powerful women; all of them led their countries to war. But it is also true that these women rose to leadership by playing according to the political rules of "a man's world." It was their success in conforming to male values that enabled their rise to leadership in the first place. In a world in which women held a proportionate share (one-half) of leadership positions, they might behave differently in power."

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.