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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

February 13, 2008

"Europe's Power to Lead"

Op-Ed, Cypress Mail

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"European countries’ success in overcoming centuries of animosity, and the development of a large internal market, has given them a great deal of soft power. At the Cold War’s end, East European countries did not try to form local alliances, as they did in the 1920s, but looked toward Brussels to secure their future. Similarly, countries like Turkey and Ukraine have adjusted their policies in response to their attraction to Europe."

 

 

November 14, 2007

"The Impressive—But Limited—Soft Power of the United Nations"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The UN has impressive power — both hard and soft — when states agree on policies under Chapter 7 of the Charter. It has modest but useful soft power when great powers disagree but are willing to acquiesce in a course of action. And it has very little power when the great powers oppose an action, or repressive member governments ignore the claims of the new "responsibility to protect." In such cases, it makes no sense to blame the UN. Soft power is real, but it has its limits. The fault lies not with the UN, but with the lack of consensus among member states."

 

 

November 7, 2007

"Smart Power and the U.S. Strategy for Security in a Post-9/11 World"

Testimony

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Richard Armitage

Joseph S. Nye and Richard Armitage testify before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, Subcommittee on National Security and Foreign Affairs, Hearing on Smart Power and the U.S. Strategy for Security in the Post-9/11 World

 

Al Jazeera English Photo

April 18, 2014

"How to Navigate the East China Sea Dispute between Japan and China"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Kevin Rudd, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"...[T]he best we can aim for is to revive the wisdom of the original Zhou-Tanaka formula. One way of doing this, as some have suggested, might be to declare the islands a maritime ecological preserve dedicated to the larger good of the region. There would be no habitation and no military use of the islands or the surrounding seas. Ideally, China and Japan would agree, but that may be unlikely in the current climate. Other mechanisms could be explored to produce the same end."

 

 

August 30, 2013

"Arab Revolutions Pose"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The big problem in foreign policy is the complexity of context. One has to understand not only international and transnational systems but also the intricacies of domestic politics in multiple societies. This complexity gives special relevance to Aristotle's virtue of prudence — avoiding excess or deficiency. We live in a world of diverse cultures and know very little about social engineering and how to 'build nations.' That is particularly true with regard to revolutions."

 

 

Wikimedia Commons

July 15, 2013

"North Korea's Powerful Weakness Over China"

Op-Ed, Moscow Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"China was sincere in expressing its desire for a non-nuclear Korean Peninsula, but the nuclear issue was not its primary concern. It also sought to prevent the collapse of the North Korean regime and the resulting potential for chaos on its border — not only flows of refugees, but also the possibility that South Korean or U.S. troops could move into North Korea."

 

 

March/April 2013

"Our Pacific Predicament"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, American Interest, issue 4, volume 8

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"American interests rest on stability in the region to allow the continuing growth of trade and investment that benefits all countries. The U.S.-Japan alliance remains crucial to stability in East Asia, but so too are good relations in all three sides of the strategic triangle. One thing is clear: If, despite all we do, Sino-Japanese relations deteriorate toward literal conflict, the United States will be faced with some very tough choices."

 

 

February 11, 2013

"The Information Revolution Gets Political"

Op-Ed, The Australian

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Beneath the Arab political revolutions lies a deeper and longer process of radical change that is sometimes called the information revolution. We cannot yet fully grasp its implications, but it is fundamentally transforming the nature of power in the twenty-first century, in which all states exist in an environment that even the most powerful authorities cannot control as they did in the past."

 

 

November 27, 2012

"Japan's Nationalism is a Sign of Weakness"

Op-Ed, Financial Times (London)

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Japanese public opinion is shifting to the right and in a more nationalistic direction. Not only has Mr Abe recently visited the Yasukuni Shrine, a controversial second world war memorial, but politicians to his right have formed new parties and staked out nationalistic positions. Shintaro Ishihara, the former Tokyo mayor who helped spur the dispute with China over the Senkaku Islands, speaks of Japan acquiring nuclear weapons."

 

 

September 5, 2012

"A War over Desolate Asian Islets"

Op-Ed, Globe and Mail

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The revival of extreme nationalism in East Asia is both worrisome and understandable. In Europe, while Greeks may grumble about the terms of German backing for emergency financing, the period since the Second World War has seen enormous progress in knitting countries together. Nothing similar has happened in Asia, and issues dating back to the 1930s and 1940s remain raw, a problem exacerbated by biased textbooks and government policies."

 

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