Belfer Center Home > People > Joseph S. Nye

« Back to Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

Soft power (continued)

AP Photo

December 10, 2007

"Stop Getting Mad, America. Get Smart"

Op-Ed, The Washington Post

By Richard Armitage and Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...security threats are no longer simply military threats. China is building two coal-fired power plants each week. U.S. hard power will do little to curb this trend, but U.S.-developed technology can make Chinese coal cleaner, which helps the environment and opens new markets for American industry

In a changing world, the United States should become a smarter power by once again investing in the global good — by providing things that people and governments want but cannot attain without U.S. leadership."

 

 

November 14, 2007

"Afterword: Election '08, Smart Power '09"

Report Chapter

By Richard Armitage and Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"We believe that the United States must become a smarter power by reinvesting in the global good — providing things people and governments in all quarters of the world want but cannot attain in the absence of U.S. leadership. Providing for the global good helps America reconcile its overwhelming power with the rest of the world's interests, values, and aspirations. It is not charity. It is effective foreign policy."

 

 

November 14, 2007

"The Impressive—But Limited—Soft Power of the United Nations"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The UN has impressive power — both hard and soft — when states agree on policies under Chapter 7 of the Charter. It has modest but useful soft power when great powers disagree but are willing to acquiesce in a course of action. And it has very little power when the great powers oppose an action, or repressive member governments ignore the claims of the new "responsibility to protect." In such cases, it makes no sense to blame the UN. Soft power is real, but it has its limits. The fault lies not with the UN, but with the lack of consensus among member states."

 

 

November 7, 2007

"Smart Power and the U.S. Strategy for Security in a Post-9/11 World"

Testimony

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Richard Armitage

Joseph S. Nye and Richard Armitage testify before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, Subcommittee on National Security and Foreign Affairs, Hearing on Smart Power and the U.S. Strategy for Security in the Post-9/11 World

 

 

September 17, 2007

"America and Global Public Goods"

Op-Ed, Daily Times, (Pakistan)

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"By using its good offices to mediate conflicts in places like Northern Ireland, Morocco, and the Aegean Sea, the US has helped in shaping international order in ways that are beneficial to other nations."

 

 

July 13, 2007

"Does the UN Still Matter?"

Op-Ed, The Financial Express, (India)

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The UN is more an instrument of its member states than an independent actor in world politics."

 

 

July 1, 2007

"All Hail America? Book Review of Are We Rome? The Fall of an Empire and the Fate of America by Cullen Murphy"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, The Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...Murphy sees six interesting parallels: focus on the capital city, reliance on military instruments, privatization of public goods, parochial attitudes toward the outside world, problems with borders, and growing complexity."

 

 

June 14, 2007

"Japan's Valued Role in Promoting Public Goods"

Op-Ed, Asahi Shimbun

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

This commentary comprises excerpts from a keynote speech Joseph S. Nye delivered May 26 in Tokyo at an Asahi Shimbun symposium on its 21 "Proposals for Japan's New Strategies" that ran in May 3 editions of The Asahi Shimbun and on May 23 in IHT/Asahi.

 

 

May 11, 2007

"Instability Has Damaged Turkey's International Standing"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[T]he invasion of Iraq also hurt Turkey, both economically and by strengthening the base for the Kurdish terrorist PKK organization operating from northern Iraq. The result has been a dramatic increase in anti-Americanism in Turkish politics. If the neocons had instead focused their attentions on strengthening the soft power of Turkey, they could have done far more to advance the cause of democracy in the Middle East."

 

 

Fall 2006

"Smart Power: In Search of the Balance between Hard and Soft Power (Book Review of Hard Power: The New Politics of National Security By Kurt M. Campbell and Michael E. O'Hanlon)"

Journal Article, Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, issue 2

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"When I developed the concept of soft power a decade and a half ago, the conventional wisdom was that the United States was in decline. As the late Senator Paul Tsongas put it in 1992, "the Cold War is over, and Japan and Germany won." As I was trying to understand why the declinists were wrong and why I thought the United States would be the leading country of the twenty-first century, I totaled up American military and economic power and realized that something was still missing: the enormous capacity of this country to get what it wants by attraction rather than through coercion. This attractive, or "soft," power stemmed from American culture, values, and policies that were broadly inclusive and seen as legitimate in the eyes of others."

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.