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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

Globalization (continued)

March 24, 2003

Divided We War

Op-Ed, Globe and Mail

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

 

March 13, 2003

Scenarios for Making the World Safe: Middle East Futures

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

 

February 17, 2003

Honey of Soft Power Will Catch More Flies

Op-Ed, Los Angeles Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

 

January 10, 2003

Propaganda Isn't the Way: Soft Power

Op-Ed, International Herald Tribune

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

March 11, 2015

"American Hegemony or American Primacy?"

Op-Ed, Azernews

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...'[P]rimacy' seems like a more accurate description of a country's disproportionate (and measurable) share of all three kinds of power resources: military, economic, and soft. The question now is whether the era of US primacy is coming to an end."

 

 

January 2015

Is the American Century Over?

Book

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

For more than a century, the United States has been the world's most powerful state. Now some analysts predict that China will soon take its place. Does this mean that we are living in a post-American world? Will China's rapid rise spark a new Cold War between the two titans?

 

 

September 4, 2014

"Western Strategy for a Declining Russia"

Op-Ed, Gulf News

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Some of Russia's opponents may welcome the country's decline on the grounds that the problem will eventually solve itself, but that will be shortsighted. A century ago, the decline of the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires proved highly disruptive to the international system. A gradual decline, like that of ancient Rome or 18th-century Spain, is less disruptive than a rapid one, but ultimately the best scenario would feature a recovering and rebalanced Russia over the next decade."

 

 

White House Photo

June 17, 2014

"Barack Obama's Pragmatism Invites Uninformed, Partisan Criticism"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"But restraint is not isolationism. No one accused President Dwight Eisenhower of isolationism when he accepted a stalemate in the Korean War, refused to intervene at Dien Bien Phu, resisted recommendations from senior military officers regarding islands near Taiwan, watched the Red Army invade Hungary, or refused to back allies in the Suez Canal crisis. Nor did those who now disparage Obama's measured response to Russian President Vladimir Putin's recent annexation of Ukrainian territory call Bush an isolationist for his weak response to Putin's invasion of Georgia in 2008."

 

 

Al Jazeera English Photo

April 18, 2014

"How to Navigate the East China Sea Dispute between Japan and China"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Kevin Rudd, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"...[T]he best we can aim for is to revive the wisdom of the original Zhou-Tanaka formula. One way of doing this, as some have suggested, might be to declare the islands a maritime ecological preserve dedicated to the larger good of the region. There would be no habitation and no military use of the islands or the surrounding seas. Ideally, China and Japan would agree, but that may be unlikely in the current climate. Other mechanisms could be explored to produce the same end."

 

 

January 13, 2014

"1914 Revisited?"

Op-Ed, Today's Zaman

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"But historical analogies, though sometimes useful for precautionary purposes, become dangerous when they convey a sense of historical inevitability. WWI was not inevitable. It was made more probable by Germany's rising power and the fear that this created in Great Britain. But it was also made more probable by Germany's fearful response to Russia's rising power, as well as myriad other factors, including human errors. But the gap in overall power between the US and China today is greater than that between Germany and Britain in 1914."

 

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