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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

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June 12, 2012

"The Intervention Dilemma"

Op-Ed, Namibian

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Prudence does not mean that nothing can be done in Syria. Other governments can continue to try to convince Russia that its interests are better served by getting rid of the current regime than by permitting the continued radicalisation of his opponents. Tougher sanctions can continue to delegitimise the regime, and Turkey might be persuaded to take stronger steps against its neighbour."

 

 

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May 9, 2012

"China's Soft Power Deficit"

Op-Ed, Wall Street Journal

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The 2008 Olympics was a success abroad, but shortly afterward China's domestic crackdown on human rights activists undercut its soft-power gains. The Shanghai Expo was also a great success, but it was followed by the jailing of Nobel Peace Laureate Liu Xiaobo. His empty chair at the Oslo ceremony was a powerful symbol. And for all the efforts to turn Xinhua and China Central Television into competitors for CNN and the BBC, there is little international audience for brittle propaganda."

 

 

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January 17, 2012

"Why China Is Weak on Soft Power"

Op-Ed, International Herald Tribune

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The 2008 Olympics were a success, but shortly afterwards, China's domestic crackdown in Tibet and Xianjiang, and on human rights activists, undercut its soft power gains. The Shanghai Expo was also a great success, but was followed by the jailing of the Nobel peace laureate Liu Xiaobo and the artist Ai Weiwei."

 

 

AP Photo

June 9, 2011

"Syria Can Prove that Sanctions Do Work"

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"As the death toll in Syria approached 1,000, President Barack Obama finally announced sanctions against the regime. His move stopped Americans doing business with President Bashar al-Assad, along with certain relatives and officials, and froze their US assets. Cynics scoffed, repeating the conventional wisdom that sanctions don't work. In fact they can make a big difference and, with Syrian violence worsening, the time is right for more."

 

 

Summer 2011

"What Role Should the U.S. Play in Middle East?"

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School, Nicholas Burns, Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Politics, Harvard Kennedy School, Ashraf Hegazy, Former Executive Director, The Dubai Initiative, Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Stephen M. Walt, Robert and Renée Belfer Professor of International Affairs; Faculty Chair, International Security Program

The Belfer Center's Graham Allison, Nicholas Burns, Ashraf Hegazy, Joseph S. Nye, and Stephen Walt consider the U.S.'s shifting foreign policy in the Middle East.

 

 

April 12, 2011

"A 2007 Trip to Libya"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"It is possible, however, that the mere presence of Harvard professors bolstered his confidence and determination to remain in power. If so, I regret such an unintended consequence of my visit, since I am on record supporting his overthrow and agree with President Obama's actions. But I suspect that for all Harvard's self-importance (which the Globe editorial echoes), there are more significant causes of Khadafy's intransigence today than the visit of a professor four years ago."

 

 

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April 7, 2011

"From Lone Ranger to Smart Arranger"

Op-Ed, Politico

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...Obama was careful not to create a global narrative of a third U.S. military attack on a Muslim country, which would have reverberated from Morocco to Indonesia. Instead, he waited until the Arab League and U.N. Security Council resolutions provided a narrative of a legitimate enforcement of humanitarian responsibility to protect civilians."

 

 

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March 25, 2011

"China's Repression Undoes Its Charm Offensive"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"After my lecture at Beijing University, a student asked how China could increase its soft power. I suggested that he ask himself why India's Bollywood films command far greater international audiences than do Chinese films. Does India have better directors and actors? When Zhang Yimou, the acclaimed Chinese director, was asked a similar question, he replied that films about contemporary China are neutered by the censors. I told the student that much of a country's soft power is generated by its civil society and that China had to lighten up on its censorship and controls if it wished to succeed."

 

 

AP Photo

February 7, 2011

"The Reality of Virtual Power"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...Obama and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have issued public as well as private appeals for reform and change in Egypt and the wider Arab world, while also urging limits to violence by all parties. Moreover, they have aligned themselves with freedom of information in the face of efforts by the Egyptian regime to block Internet access."

 

 

AP Photo

December 6, 2010

"[PS] North Korean Enigma"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"China does not want a nuclear or belligerent North Korea, but it is even more concerned about a failed state collapsing on its border. China has tried to persuade Kim's regime to follow its market-oriented example, but Kim is afraid that an economic opening would lead to a political opening and loss of dictatorial control. So, while China is trying to moderate the current crisis, its influence is limited."

 

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