Belfer Center Home > Experts > Joseph S. Nye

« Back to Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

AP Photo

November 22, 2010

"Japan's Options"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The main danger for Japan today is a tendency to turn inward, rather than becoming a global civilian power that realizes its great potential to produce global public goods. For example, Japan's aid budget has declined, and only half as many Japanese students study overseas as did two decades ago. An inward-looking Japan would be a loss for the entire world."

 

 

AP Photo

September 10, 2010

"Can Russia Be Great?"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Many Russian futures are possible. At one extreme, some view Russia as an industrialized banana republic whose corrupt institutions and insurmountable demographic and health problems make decline inevitable. Others argue that reform and modernization will enable Russia to surmount its problems, and that its leadership is headed in this direction."

 

 

AP Photo

June 14, 2010

"The Future of Europe"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The EU's approach to sharing power, hammering out agreements, and resolving conflict by multiple committees can be frustrating and lacks drama, but it is increasingly relevant for many issues in a networked and interdependent world....In terms of economic power, Europe has the world's largest market, and represents 17 percent of world trade, compared to 12 percent for the U.S. Europe also dispenses half of the world's foreign assistance, compared to 20 percent for the U.S. But all this potential strength may be to no avail if Europeans do not solve the immediate problems stemming from financial markets' loss of confidence in the euro."

 

 

AP Photo

November 9, 2009

"Who Caused the End of the Cold War?"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Ultimately the deepest causes of Soviet collapse were the decline of communist ideology and the failure of the Soviet economy. This would have happened even without Gorbachev. In the early Cold War, communism and the Soviet Union had a good deal of soft power. Many communists had led the resistance against fascism in Europe, and many people believed that communism was the wave of the future....Although in theory communism aimed to instill a system of class justice, Lenin's heirs maintained domestic power through a brutal state security system involving lethal purges, gulags, broad censorship, and the use of informants. The net effect of these repressive measures was a general loss of faith in the system."

 

 

February 13, 2008

"Europe's Power to Lead"

Op-Ed, Cypress Mail

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"European countries’ success in overcoming centuries of animosity, and the development of a large internal market, has given them a great deal of soft power. At the Cold War’s end, East European countries did not try to form local alliances, as they did in the 1920s, but looked toward Brussels to secure their future. Similarly, countries like Turkey and Ukraine have adjusted their policies in response to their attraction to Europe."

 

 

November 14, 2007

"The Impressive—But Limited—Soft Power of the United Nations"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The UN has impressive power — both hard and soft — when states agree on policies under Chapter 7 of the Charter. It has modest but useful soft power when great powers disagree but are willing to acquiesce in a course of action. And it has very little power when the great powers oppose an action, or repressive member governments ignore the claims of the new "responsibility to protect." In such cases, it makes no sense to blame the UN. Soft power is real, but it has its limits. The fault lies not with the UN, but with the lack of consensus among member states."

 

 

November 7, 2007

"Smart Power and the U.S. Strategy for Security in a Post-9/11 World"

Testimony

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Richard Armitage

Joseph S. Nye and Richard Armitage testify before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, Subcommittee on National Security and Foreign Affairs, Hearing on Smart Power and the U.S. Strategy for Security in the Post-9/11 World

 

November 6, 2014

"China's Questionable Economic Power"

Op-Ed, Today's Zaman

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"China holds dollars that it receives from its exports to America, while the US, by keeping its market open to Chinese products, helps to generate growth, employment, and stability in China. Yes, China could bring the US economy to its knees by dumping its dollars, but not without taking a serious hit itself."

 

 

Al Jazeera English Photo

April 18, 2014

"How to Navigate the East China Sea Dispute between Japan and China"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Kevin Rudd, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"...[T]he best we can aim for is to revive the wisdom of the original Zhou-Tanaka formula. One way of doing this, as some have suggested, might be to declare the islands a maritime ecological preserve dedicated to the larger good of the region. There would be no habitation and no military use of the islands or the surrounding seas. Ideally, China and Japan would agree, but that may be unlikely in the current climate. Other mechanisms could be explored to produce the same end."

 

 

August 30, 2013

"Arab Revolutions Pose"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The big problem in foreign policy is the complexity of context. One has to understand not only international and transnational systems but also the intricacies of domestic politics in multiple societies. This complexity gives special relevance to Aristotle's virtue of prudence — avoiding excess or deficiency. We live in a world of diverse cultures and know very little about social engineering and how to 'build nations.' That is particularly true with regard to revolutions."

 

SUBSCRIBE

Receive email updates on the most pressing topics in science and int'l affairs.

Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev.