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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Topic

 

August 30, 2013

"Arab Revolutions Pose"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The big problem in foreign policy is the complexity of context. One has to understand not only international and transnational systems but also the intricacies of domestic politics in multiple societies. This complexity gives special relevance to Aristotle's virtue of prudence ó avoiding excess or deficiency. We live in a world of diverse cultures and know very little about social engineering and how to 'build nations.' That is particularly true with regard to revolutions."

 

 

AP Photo

April 7, 2011

"From Lone Ranger to Smart Arranger"

Op-Ed, Politico

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...Obama was careful not to create a global narrative of a third U.S. military attack on a Muslim country, which would have reverberated from Morocco to Indonesia. Instead, he waited until the Arab League and U.N. Security Council resolutions provided a narrative of a legitimate enforcement of humanitarian responsibility to protect civilians."

 

 

AP Photo

January 13, 2010

"Is Military Power Becoming Obsolete?"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Armed groups view conflict as a continuum of political and violent irregular operations over a long period that will provide control over local populations. They benefit from the fact that scores of weak states lack the legitimacy or capacity to control their own territory effectively."

 

 

AP Photo

January 11, 2009

"The Dark Side of Self-Determination"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Self-determination has turned out to be an ambiguous moral principle. Woodrow Wilson thought it would solve problems in central Europe in 1919, but it created as many as it solved. Adolf Hitler used the principle to undermine fragile states in the 1930's. Today, with less than 10% of the world's states being homogeneous, treating self-determination as a primary moral principle could have disastrous consequences in many regions."

 

 

January 15, 2007

"Bush's Old-New Plan for Iraq"

Op-Ed, Daily Times, (Pakistan)

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"It is too late to create a democracy in Iraq. At best, the overthrow of Saddam removed a threatening dictator, and substituted a tyranny of the majority for the tyranny of a minority. But the price has been high in terms of Iraqi lives lost in sectarian fighting."

 

Summer 2011

"What Role Should the U.S. Play in Middle East?"

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School, Nicholas Burns, Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Politics, Harvard Kennedy School, Ashraf Hegazy, Former Executive Director, The Dubai Initiative, Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Stephen M. Walt, Robert and Renée Belfer Professor of International Affairs; Faculty Chair, International Security Program

The Belfer Center's Graham Allison, Nicholas Burns, Ashraf Hegazy, Joseph S. Nye, and Stephen Walt consider the U.S.'s shifting foreign policy in the Middle East.

 

 

AP Photo

May 19, 2010

"China's Century is Not Yet upon Us"

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Unlike India, which was born with a democratic constitution, China has not yet found a way to solve the problem of demands for political participation (if not democracy) that tend to accompany rising per capita income. The ideology of communism is long gone, and the legitimacy of the ruling party depends upon economic growth and ethnic Han nationalism. Some experts argue that the Chinese political system lacks legitimacy, suffers from a high level of corruption and is vulnerable to political unrest should the economy falter. Whether China can develop a formula that can manage an expanding urban middle class, regional inequality and resentment among ethnic minorities remains to be seen."

 

 

AP Photo

January 11, 2009

"The Dark Side of Self-Determination"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Self-determination has turned out to be an ambiguous moral principle. Woodrow Wilson thought it would solve problems in central Europe in 1919, but it created as many as it solved. Adolf Hitler used the principle to undermine fragile states in the 1930's. Today, with less than 10% of the world's states being homogeneous, treating self-determination as a primary moral principle could have disastrous consequences in many regions."

 

 

May 11, 2007

"Instability Has Damaged Turkey's International Standing"

Op-Ed, Daily Star

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[T]he invasion of Iraq also hurt Turkey, both economically and by strengthening the base for the Kurdish terrorist PKK organization operating from northern Iraq. The result has been a dramatic increase in anti-Americanism in Turkish politics. If the neocons had instead focused their attentions on strengthening the soft power of Turkey, they could have done far more to advance the cause of democracy in the Middle East."

 

 

February 15, 2007

The Long View on China, Political Islam and American Power

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

 

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