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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Program/Project

 

International Security

www.kremlin.ru photo

April 10, 2014

"Putin's Calculus"

Op-Ed, New Europe

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...Obama's declaration that Russia is a regional power acting out of weakness, no less than Russia's suspension from the G-8, may have hit Putin where he is most vulnerable. His actions in Ukraine have undoubtedly brought Russia tangible gains in the short term. But they also imply less obvious costs. It remains to be seen whether Putin's bold move was worth it."

 

 

January 13, 2014

"1914 Revisited?"

Op-Ed, Today's Zaman

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"But historical analogies, though sometimes useful for precautionary purposes, become dangerous when they convey a sense of historical inevitability. WWI was not inevitable. It was made more probable by Germany's rising power and the fear that this created in Great Britain. But it was also made more probable by Germany's fearful response to Russia's rising power, as well as myriad other factors, including human errors. But the gap in overall power between the US and China today is greater than that between Germany and Britain in 1914."

 

 

Jerry Michalski Photo

December 13, 2013

"Governance in the Information Age"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The WEF's Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government...has considered ways in which information technology can improve governance and reduce feelings of alienation among the governed. The most effective initiatives, the council observed, often arise from partnerships between government and the private sector."

 

 

Japanese Wikipedia

December 3, 2013

"The Return of Japan After 20 Years of Stagnation"

Op-Ed, Moscow Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"A quick resolution of the Senkaku Islands dispute, or of Japan's lower-profile conflict with South Korea over the Korean-controlled Liancourt Rocks, is improbable, but Japan could be more proactive. For example, by stating their willingness to take any territorial disputes to the International Court of Justice, Japanese authorities could help to dispel perceptions of militarism."

 

 

November 14, 2013

"The Legacy of John F. Kennedy Reconsidered"

Op-Ed, Moscow Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Rather than being critical of Kennedy for not living up to his rhetoric, we should be grateful that in critical situations, he was prudent and transactional rather than ideological and transformational. The most important achievement of Kennedy's brief presidency was  to manage the 1962 Cuban missile crisis and defuse what was  probably the riskiest episode since the dawn of the nuclear age."

 

 

September 13, 2013

"The Mouse Click That Roared"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Cyber war and cyber espionage are largely associated with states, while cyber crime and cyber terrorism are mostly associated with non-state actors. The highest costs currently stem from espionage and crime; but, over the next decade or so, cyber war and cyber terrorism may become greater threats than they are today. Moreover, as alliances and tactics evolve, the categories may increasingly overlap. Terrorists might buy malware from criminals, and governments might find it useful to hide behind both."

 

 

August 30, 2013

"Arab Revolutions Pose"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The big problem in foreign policy is the complexity of context. One has to understand not only international and transnational systems but also the intricacies of domestic politics in multiple societies. This complexity gives special relevance to Aristotle's virtue of prudence — avoiding excess or deficiency. We live in a world of diverse cultures and know very little about social engineering and how to 'build nations.' That is particularly true with regard to revolutions."

 

 

August 26, 2013

"By Way of Power"

Op-Ed, Mark News

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"As for the perceived loss of America's much-vaunted superpower status, we simply need to come to terms with the changing reality of international relations, and accept that the United States will have to work with others to achieve its global aims. The changes of a global information age mean that even the world's only superpower can't go it alone."

 

 

August 12, 2013

"Surveillance and American Liberty"

Op-Ed, Today's Zaman

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"American policy is not to steal intellectual property, while China's policy appears to be the opposite. At the same time, both governments constantly hack into each other's computers to steal traditional political and military secrets. Spying is not a violation of international law (though it often violates various domestic laws), but the US argues that theft of intellectual property violates both the spirit and letter of international trade agreements."

 

 

AP Photo

July 24, 2013

"The Infant Prince George is a Source of Real-world Power"

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Promoting attractive images of one's country is not new but the conditions for trying to create soft power have changed dramatically in recent decades. For one thing, nearly half the countries in the world are now democracies. In such circumstances, diplomacy aimed at public opinion can become as important to outcomes as the traditional classified diplomatic communications among leaders. Information creates power, and today a much larger part of the world's population has access to that power."

 

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We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev.