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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2011 (continued)

AP Photo

April 12, 2011

"The War on Soft Power"

Op-Ed, Foreign Policy

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"It is true that the U.S. military has an impressive operational capacity, but the practice of turning to the Pentagon because it can get things done leads to the image of an over-militarized foreign policy. Moreover, it can create a destructive cycle, as the capacity of civilian agencies and tools gets hollowed out to feed the military budget. Today, the United States spends about 500 times more on its military than it does on broadcasting and exchanges combined. Congress cuts shortwave broadcasts to save the equivalent of one hour of the defense budget. Is that smart?"

 

 

April 12, 2011

"A 2007 Trip to Libya"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"It is possible, however, that the mere presence of Harvard professors bolstered his confidence and determination to remain in power. If so, I regret such an unintended consequence of my visit, since I am on record supporting his overthrow and agree with President Obama's actions. But I suspect that for all Harvard's self-importance (which the Globe editorial echoes), there are more significant causes of Khadafy's intransigence today than the visit of a professor four years ago."

 

 

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April 7, 2011

"From Lone Ranger to Smart Arranger"

Op-Ed, Politico

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...Obama was careful not to create a global narrative of a third U.S. military attack on a Muslim country, which would have reverberated from Morocco to Indonesia. Instead, he waited until the Arab League and U.N. Security Council resolutions provided a narrative of a legitimate enforcement of humanitarian responsibility to protect civilians."

 

 

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April 6, 2011

"U.S.-China Relationship: A Shift in Perceptions of Power"

Op-Ed, Los Angeles Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"It is likely that China's leaders will draw back somewhat from the overly assertive posture that has proved so costly. Hu's stated desire to cooperate on terrorism, nonproliferation and clean energy should help reduce tensions, but powerful domestic interest groups in export industries and the People's Liberation Army want to limit economic and military cooperation. And most important, given the increasing nationalism of the Chinese people that one sees on display in the blogosphere, it will be difficult for top Chinese leaders to change their policies dramatically."

 

 

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March 25, 2011

"China's Repression Undoes Its Charm Offensive"

Op-Ed, Washington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"After my lecture at Beijing University, a student asked how China could increase its soft power. I suggested that he ask himself why India's Bollywood films command far greater international audiences than do Chinese films. Does India have better directors and actors? When Zhang Yimou, the acclaimed Chinese director, was asked a similar question, he replied that films about contemporary China are neutered by the censors. I told the student that much of a country's soft power is generated by its civil society and that China had to lighten up on its censorship and controls if it wished to succeed."

 

 

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March 8, 2011

"Zakaria's World"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Foreign Policy

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...China can draw on a talent pool of 1.3 billion people, but the United States not only draws on a talent pool of 7 billion, but can recombine them in a diverse culture that enhances creativity in a way that ethnic Han nationalism cannot."

 

 

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March 8, 2011

"America Should Not Prosecute Julian Assange"

Op-Ed, Financial Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

One-third of the world's population is now online. As we are seeing in the Middle East, this fact is changing global politics. An information revolution is shifting power away from states. US secretary of state Hillary Clinton has called for "a serious conversation about the principles that will guide us" in such a world. She says she backs the "freedom to connect" for people everywhere, and calls on others in the Middle East and Asia to follow. But if she believes this, why is the US trying to prosecute WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange?

 

 

AP Photo

February 27, 2011

"Cyberspace Wars"

Op-Ed, International Herald Tribune

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[H]uman adversaries are purposeful and intelligent. Mountains and oceans are hard to move, but portions of cyberspace can be turned on and off at the click of a mouse. It is cheaper and quicker to move electrons across the globe than to move large ships long distances through the friction of salt water. The costs of developing multiple carrier taskforces and submarine fleets create enormous barriers to entry and make it possible to speak of U.S. naval dominance. In contrast, the barriers to entry in the cyber-domain are so low that nonstate actors and small states can play significant roles at low levels of cost."

 

 

AP Photo

February 14, 2011

"In an Information Age, Soft Power Wins"

Op-Ed, CNN.com

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The problem for all states in today's global information age is that more things are happening outside the control of even the most powerful governments. In an information-based world, power diffusion is a more difficult problem to manage than power transition."

 

 

AP Photo

February 14, 2011

"The Misleading Metaphor of Decline"

Op-Ed, Wall Street Journal

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...American power is based on alliances rather than colonies, and it is associated with an ideology that is flexible and to which America can return even after it has overextended itself. Looking to the future, Anne-Marie Slaughter of Princeton argues that America's culture of openness and innovation will keep it central in an information age when networks supplement, if not fully replace, hierarchical power."

 

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