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Joseph S. Nye

Joseph S. Nye

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-1123
Fax: (617)-496-3337
Email: Joseph_Nye@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2011 (continued)

February 1, 2011

The Future of Power

Book

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

The influential policy thinker who coined the term "soft power" examines the changing nature of power since the Cold War, the new ways in which it is exercised, and how those changes impact America's role in the world.

 

 

AP Photo

January 18, 2011

"China's Hubris Colours US Relations"

Op-Ed, BBC News

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

When Barack Obama became US president, one of his top foreign policy priorities was to improve relations with China. Yet on the eve of President Hu Jintao's state visit to Washington, US-China relations are worse, rather than better.

 

 

AP Photo

January 17, 2011

"The Obama-Hu Jintao Summit Meeting This Week"

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"I have just returned from Beijing and found that many Chinese believe that China should be less deferential to the US because they think the United States is in decline. As I show in detail in my new book, The Future of Power, this Chinese view is mistaken and China is unlikely to equal American economic, military or soft power for decades to come."

 

 

AP Photo

January 12, 2011

"Asia in the Balance"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

India is thus unlikely to develop the power resources to become an equal to China in the next decade or two. And, while the two countries signed agreements in 1993 and 1996 that promised a peaceful settlement of the border dispute that led them to war in l962, it is worth noting that, just prior to India's nuclear tests in March l998, India's defense minister described China as India's "potential enemy number one." More recently, in 2009, the border issue flared again....Rather than becoming an ally, India is more likely to become one of the Asian countries that will tend to balance China's strategic rise.

 

2010

AP Photo

November/December 2010

"The Future of American Power"

Journal Article, Foreign Affairs

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

It is currently fashionable to predict a decline in the United States' power. But the United States is not in absolute decline, and in relative terms, there is a reasonable probability that it will remain more powerful than any other state in the coming decades.

 

 

AP Photo

December 6, 2010

"[PS] North Korean Enigma"

Op-Ed, The Korea Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"China does not want a nuclear or belligerent North Korea, but it is even more concerned about a failed state collapsing on its border. China has tried to persuade Kim's regime to follow its market-oriented example, but Kim is afraid that an economic opening would lead to a political opening and loss of dictatorial control. So, while China is trying to moderate the current crisis, its influence is limited."

 

 

AP Photo

November 22, 2010

"Japan's Options"

Op-Ed, Daily News Egypt

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"The main danger for Japan today is a tendency to turn inward, rather than becoming a global civilian power that realizes its great potential to produce global public goods. For example, Japan's aid budget has declined, and only half as many Japanese students study overseas as did two decades ago. An inward-looking Japan would be a loss for the entire world."

 

 

AP Photo

October 2010

"American and Chinese Power after the Financial Crisis"

Journal Article, Washington Quarterly, issue 4, volume 33

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...Asia has its own internal balance of powers, and in that context, many states continue to welcome an American presence in the region. Chinese leaders have to contend with the reactions of other countries, as well as the constraints created by their own objectives of economic growth and the need for external markets and resources. Too aggressive a Chinese military posture could produce a countervailing coalition among its neighbors that would weaken both its hard and soft power. A poll of 16 countries around the world found a positive attitude toward China’s economic rise, but not its military rise."

 

 

AP Photo

October 14, 2010

"The Future of Power"

Op-Ed, The Korea Herald

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"Much of the work of global governance will rely on formal and informal networks. Network organizations (such as the G20) are used for setting agendas, building consensus, coordinating policy, exchanging knowledge and establishing norms....To cope with transnational challenges, the international community will have to continue to develop a series of complementary networks and institutions to supplement the U.N. But if major countries are divided, it is unlikely that even networks like the G20 can set the agenda."

 

 

AP Photo

October 4, 2010

"The Pros and Cons of Citizen Diplomacy"

Op-Ed, New York Times

By Joseph S. Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor

"...[T]he goals and messages of civil-society actors are often not aligned with government policies. This gives rise to the paradox of using citizen diplomacy in a global information age — decentralization and diminished control may be central to the creation of soft power, but in an age where every phone is a camera and every computer is a photo shop, the obscure pastor of a small Florida church can also wreak havoc and destroy soft power by threatening to burn a Koran. In a democracy, such risk is unavoidable, and the best response may be the type of national conversation that eventually dissuaded the unruly pastor."

 

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