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Matthew Bunn

Matthew Bunn

Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

Member of the Board

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-9916
Fax: 617-495-8963
Email: matthew_bunn@harvard.edu

 

 

By Region

 

Americas (continued)

July 31, 2014

""Cutting Too Deep: The Obama Administration’s Proposals for Nuclear Security Spending Reductions""

Presentation

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

On July 31, 2014, Matthew Bunn and William H. Tobey presented, "Cutting Too Deep: The Obama Administration’s Proposals for Nuclear Security Spending Reductions" at a briefing jointly sponsored by the Project on Managing the Atom and the Nuclear Threat Initative in Washington, D.C.

 

 

July 30, 2014

Cutting Too Deep: The Obama Administration’s Proposals for Nuclear Security Spending Reductions

Report

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Nickolas Roth, Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom and William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

The Obama administration has proposed steep cuts in funding for improving security for dangerous nuclear materials. If approved, they would slow progress toward preventing the essential ingredients of nuclear bombs from falling into terrorist hands. Cutting too Deep reviews funding trends over the past four years and describes how the proposed cuts would delay nuclear and radiological material removal, research reactor conversion, and other work.

 

 

NNSA

July 2014

Innovating Verification: New Tools & New Actors to Reduce Nuclear Risks

Report

By Verifying Baseline Declarations of Nuclear Warheads and Materials Working Group, Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and John Carlson, Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

Part of NTI's Innovating Verification reports series, Verifying Baseline Declarations of Nuclear Warheads and Materials analyzes how baseline declarations can contribute to near- and long-term arms control and non-proliferation goals and how to verify them without compromising sensitive information.

 

 

July 14, 2014

Matthew Bunn Interviewed in Tehran Times

News

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

Amidst intense negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 countries in Vienna on Iran's nuclear program, Professor Matthew Bunn was interviewed for a July 14 article in the Tehran Times about what a comprehensive agreement would look like and how the two sides of the dispute should approach the talks to obtain significant and substantive results.

 

 

June 11, 2014

"Ensuring a Nuclear Nightmare Never Happens"

Op-Ed, The National Interest

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

Speaking at West Point last month, President Obama warned that “if nuclear materials are not secure, that poses a danger to American citizens.” Contrarily, recently proposed budget cuts could hamper work being done to ensure nuclear material never falls into the wrong hands. In his National Interest op-ed, Matthew Bunn makes the case that preventing nuclear danger should remain a top priority for Congress.

 

 

April 15, 2014

"What Kind of Material Needs What Level of Security?"

Op-Ed, Nuclear Security Matters

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

"In August of 2002, the United States – assisted by a gift from the Nuclear Threat Initiative, when it turned out no U.S. agency had money that was not blocked from doing what was needed – helped airlift 48 kilograms of 80% enriched highly enriched uranium out of the Vinca nuclear research institute in Serbia.  A force of 1,200 armed troops guarded the shipment as it moved from the lab to the airport.  Under international rules, this was dangerous “Category I” material requiring the highest level of security. But under Department of Energy (DOE) rules for categorizing nuclear material, if the same material had been at a DOE site, it would have been considered “Category III” material requiring hardly any security."

 

 

IAEA

March 25, 2014

"Progress at The Hague Nuclear Security Summit"

Op-Ed, Nuclear Security Matters

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

"So what did the nuclear security summit in The Hague accomplish?  A good deal.  Despite being overshadowed by the crisis in Ukraine and the associated crush of side meetings, the summit in The Hague once again served as a forcing event to cut through bureaucracy and get important decisions made.  Just as having friends over for dinner motivates you to clean up your house, going to a major global summit motivates leaders to push their bureaucracies to give them something worthwhile to talk about when they get there."

 

 

March 24, 2014

"Eliminating Potential Bomb Material from Japan’s Fast Critical Assembly"

Op-Ed, Nuclear Security Matters

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

"Today, the United States and Japan announced that Japan would eliminate all the plutonium and highly-enriched uranium at its Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) at Tokai-mura.  This is a tremendous step forward for nuclear security; for terrorists, this would be some of the best material that exists in any non-nuclear-weapon state.  The material includes 331 kilograms of plutonium, most of it weapons-grade, and 214.5 kilograms of weapons-grade HEU.  (The FCA also includes over a ton of material just at the 20 percent U-235 mark that defines HEU.)   The weapons-grade HEU is enough for four simple terrorist “gun-type” bombs or a larger number of trickier-to-build implosion bombs.  The plutonium amounts to more than 40 bombs worth of material..."

 

 

March 18, 2014

Advancing Nuclear Security: Evaluating Progress and Setting New Goals

Report

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom, Nickolas Roth, Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom and William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

In the lead-up to the nuclear security summit, Advancing Nuclear Security: Evaluating Progress and Setting New Goals outlines what was accomplished in a four-year effort launched in 2009 to secure nuclear material around the globe—and what remains to be done. The effort made significant progress, but some weapons-usable nuclear materials still remain “dangerously vulnerable." The authors highlight the continuing danger of nuclear and radiological terrorism and call for urgent action.

 

 

March 17, 2014

"Nuclear Security is the Foundation for the Three Pillars of the Nonproliferation Treaty"

Op-Ed, Nuclear Security Matters

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

"Many of the international diplomats preparing for the nuclear security summit in The Hague are more used to discussing disarmament, nonproliferation, and peaceful uses of nuclear energy – known as the “three pillars” of the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), the foundation of the global nonproliferation regime – than they are to discussing the security measures for protecting nuclear weapons, materials, or facilities.  Some have argued that the summit should turn from an exclusive focus on nuclear security to discuss next steps on the three pillars."

 

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