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Matthew Bunn

Matthew Bunn

Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

Member of the Board

Contact:
Telephone: (617) 495-9916
Fax: 617-495-8963
Email: matthew_bunn@harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2010 (continued)

Department of Energy

January 2010

"Nuclear Terrorism: A Strategy for Prevention"

Book Chapter

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

"On the night of November 8, 2007, two teams of armed men attacked the Pelindaba nuclear facility in South Africa, where hundreds of kilograms of weapons-grade highly enriched uranium (HEU) were stored. One of the teams opened fire on the site security forces, who reportedly fled. The other team of four armed men went through a 10,000-volt security fence, disabled the intrusion detectors so that no alarms sounded—possibly using insider knowledge of the security system—broke into the emergency control center, and shot a worker there in the chest after a brief struggle. The worker at the emergency control center raised an alarm for the first time. These intruders spent forty-five minutes inside the secured perimeter without ever being engaged by site security forces...."

 

 

U.S. NNSA

February 24, 2010

"Securing Nuclear Stockpiles in Four Years – Budget and Policy Requirements"

Presentation

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

Matthew Bunn presented "Securing Nuclear Stockpiles in Four Years – Budget and Policy Requirements;" a briefing for congressional staffers about the nature of the nuclear threat and suggested steps lawmakers could take to help achieve the President Obama's objective of securing all vulnerable nuclear materials around the world in 4 years.

 

 

Courtesy of DOE/NREL

January 14, 2010

"U.S. Public Energy Innovation Institutions and Mechanisms: Status & Deficiencies"

Policy Memo

By Laura Diaz Anadon, Assistant Professor of Public Policy; Associate Director, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program; Co-PI, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Charles Jones, Former Associate, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2011–2013; Former Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, 2008–2010 and Venkatesh "Venky" Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Professor of Technology and Public Policy; Professor of Physics, Harvard; Director, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program; Co-Principal Investigator, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

The United States needs to transform the way it produces and uses energy. This will require the improvement of current technologies and the development of new ones. To achieve the maximum payoff for public investments in energy technology innovation, the United States will need to improve and better align the management and structure of existing and new energy innovation institutions, and better connect R&D to demonstration and deployment. In this policy memo, the authors discuss three general and important recommendations for thinking about different initiatives, and we discuss the merits and challenges of current and new institutions, and the remaining gaps in the U.S. energy innovation system.

 

 

AP Photo

Fall 2009

"Reducing the Greatest Risks of Nuclear Theft & Terrorism"

Journal Article, Daedalus, issue 4, volume 138

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

"Keeping nuclear weapons and the difficult-to-manufacture materials needed to make them out of terrorist hands is critical to U.S. and world security — and to the future of nuclear energy as well. In the aftermath of a terrorist nuclear attack, there would be no chance of convincing governments, utilities, and publics to build nuclear reactors on the scale required for nuclear energy to make any significant contribution to coping with climate change."

 

2009

Fall 2009

"Enabling a Nuclear Revival—and Managing Its Risks"

Journal Article, Innovations, issue 4, volume 4

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom

Matthew Bunn and Martin B. Malin examine the conditions needed for nuclear energy to grow on a scale large enough for it to be a significant part of the world’s response to climate change. They consider the safety, security, nonproliferation, and waste management risks associated with such growth and recommend approaches to managing these risks. Bunn and Malin argue that although technological solutions may contribute to nuclear expansion in the coming decades, in the near term, creating the conditions for large-scale nuclear energy growth will require major international institutional innovation.

 

 

November 19-20, 2009

"Protecting Stocks of Weapons-Usable Material Worldwide Against Global Terrorist Threats"

Presentation

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Evgeniy P. Maslin

Matthew Bunn and Evgeniy P. Maslin presented "Protecting Stocks of Weapons-Usable Material Worldwide Against Global Terrorist Threats" at the workshop on “Protecting Nuclear Programmes From Terrorism,” in Vienna, November 19-20, 2009, which was sponsored by World Institute of Nuclear Security and and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

 

AP Photo

November 2009

"Beyond Zero Enrichment: Suggestions for an Iranian Nuclear Deal"

Policy Brief

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

"Some form of negotiated agreement, if it can be achieved, is the “least bad” option for U.S. interests—but is likely to have to include some continuing enrichment in Iran. There are real security risks in agreeing to permit some ongoing enrichment in Iran, but if appropriately managed, these security risks are less than those created by a military strike or allowing Iran to continue unfettered enrichment with no agreement."

 

 

AP Photo

September 24, 2009

President Obama's Nuclear Resolution: Statements from Matthew Bunn & William H. Tobey of Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center

News

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

The following are statements from Matthew Bunn and William H. Tobey at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs on President Obama’s nuclear resolution.

 

 

September 22, 2009

"Options for Limiting the Security Risks from a Negotiated Nuclear Settlement with Iran"

Presentation

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

Matthew Bunn considers the premises, facts, and risks underlying negotiation with Iran over their nuclear program. He describes a range of options for limiting the risks of a negotiated settlement with Iran. Bunn suggests that insisting on zero centrifuges is likely to lead to no agreement. It is time to begin thinking about what the lowest risk, non-zero options may look like.

 

 

June 25, 2009

DOE FY 2010 Budget Request and Recovery Act Funding for Energy Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment: Analysis and Recommendations

Report

By Laura Diaz Anadon, Assistant Professor of Public Policy; Associate Director, Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program; Co-PI, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Kelly Sims Gallagher, Member of the Board and Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

A new analysis of energy research, development, demonstration, and deployment (ERD3) funding in the Obama administration's FY2010 budget and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 finds that the total available for energy research development and demonstration alone and ERD3 in FY2010 would double and increase by two-thirds, respectively, compared to FY2009 (based on certain assumptions). These substantial funding increases—coupled with a range of institutional innovations the administration is implementing and movement toward putting a price on carbon emissions—will help accelerate innovation for a broad range of energy technologies. This report analyzes DOE's budget request for ERD3 and the Recovery Act and makes recommendations for further action by Congress and the administration.

 

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The Project on Managing the Atom (MTA) conducts and disseminates policy-relevant research on nuclear weapons, nuclear energy, and nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament.

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