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Stephen Van Evera

Stephen Van Evera

Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security

 

Experience

Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987

Professor of Political Science, Security Studies Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

 

By Date

 

2009

AP Photo

September 2009

"Public Diplomacy: Ideas for the War of Ideas"

Discussion Paper

By Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security and Peter Krause, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2010–2011

The United States cannot defeat al-Qaeda by strength of arms alone.  It must also change the terms of debate in the Arab/Muslim world, especially in its radical wing.  How can this best be accomplished?  What strategy should the United States adopt for what is often called the “war of ideas” against radical Islam?

 

2006

September, 2006

Assessing U.S. Strategy in the War on Terror

Book Chapter

By Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security

 

 

2006

How to Make America Safe

Book

By Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security

How to Make America Safe: New Policies for National Security includes papers from the Tobin Project's National Security Working Group. The introduction states: "In order to win the war on terror and make America as safe as it can be, a new national security strategy is required. The seeds of such a strategy are evident in the latest works of eleven of the nation's most eminent national security scholars. They envision a broader war, which combats terrorism on all fronts - not just with military force - and directs our resources and energy toward the gravest threat we face: nuclear weapons falling into the hands of terrorists. As our experiences in Iraq have shown, our current strategy is fundamentally ill-suited to fighting the type of conflict in which we find ourselves.

 

1999

Winter 1998/1999

"Correspondence: Taking Offense at Offense Defense Theory"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 3, volume 23

By James W. Davis Jr., Bernard I. Finel, Stacie Goddard, Former Research Fellow, Intrastate Conflict Program/International Security Program, 2001-2002, Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security, Charles Glaser, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1982-1985; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security and Chaim Kaufmann

The usefulness of offense-defense theory is the subject of our correspondence section.

 

1998

Spring 1998

"Offense, Defense, and the Causes of War"

Journal Article, International Security, issue 4, volume 22

By Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security

The author argues that the likelihood of war increases when conquest is easy, and that changes in the offense-defense balance can greatly heighten or lessen the chances of war.

 

1990

September 1990

Nuclear Diplomacy and Crisis Management

International Security Reader

By Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Editor, International Security; Series Editor, Belfer Center Studies in International Security, Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security

These essays from the journal International Security examine the effects of the nuclear revolution on the international system and the role nuclear threats have played in international crises.

 

1989

August 1989

Soviet Military Policy

International Security Reader

By Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Editor, International Security; Series Editor, Belfer Center Studies in International Security, Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security

Soviet military policy has been one of the most important and perplexing issues confronting the United States since 1945. Mikhail Gorbachev's foreign policy innovations have focused renewed attention on these vital questions.

 

No Date

Military Strategy and the Origins of the First World War

Book

By Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security, Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Editor, International Security; Series Editor, Belfer Center Studies in International Security

 

 

The Star Wars Controversy

Book

By Stephen Van Evera, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 1978-1981 and 1984-1987; Editorial Board Member, Quarterly Journal: International Security and Steven E. Miller, Director, International Security Program; Editor-in-Chief, International Security; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom

 

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