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Juliette Kayyem

Juliette Kayyem

Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: 617-496-6743
Fax: 617-495-8963
Email: juliette.kayyem@gmail.com

 

 

By Program/Project

 

International Security (continued)

October 30, 2012

"Obama's Message of Tough Love"

Op-Ed, CNN.com

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

"If storms like Sandy are likely in the future, we will begin to see a move toward a more resilient infrastructure, starting with projects that are already under way. Local and state governments are likely to require that primary power cables are underground and protected."

 

 

AP Photo

October 30, 2012

"Hurricane Solidarity Won't Last Long"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

"Hurricane Sandy will follow that familiar trajectory — politically if not meteorologically. There is a presidential election in its path, and while the campaigns were suspended Monday, the desire to win has not. What makes Sandy politically significant isn't just that Obama will be judged by the response; it's also that Mitt Romney, who has endorsed the idea of disbanding FEMA and returning its duties to the states, has good reason to keep quiet."

 

 

October 29, 2012

"US View of Cuba is Stuck in the 1960s"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

"The movement of people, including through immigration rules, is a powerful force compelling many foreign policy changes. Cuba's reforms will increase the ties between the nations; American constituencies tied to the past will be left fighting a relic. It is simply no longer a question of whether the United States is willing to assess its Cuba strategy, just when."

 

 

October 25, 2012

"Science and the Civic Duty"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

"Science was not on trial; scientists were. The facts of the case are much more complicated than its critics care to explain. The judges did not argue that earthquake prediction is perfect; they did not demand flawless accuracy in a field that everyone knows is more an art form. Instead, they ruled that members of the so-called Great Risks Commission had not only failed to properly assess the evidence before them, but had actually communicated — and had allowed politicians to communicate — the exact opposite, despite evidence to the contrary."

 

 

October 23, 2012

"A Night to Woo Women Voters"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

"But Romney's late pivot to a kinder/gentler candidate bumped up against his record of statements; his performance seemed more passive than pacifist. Once Romney took hawk-talk off the table, he just couldn't separate himself from Obama."

 

 

October 22, 2012

"Is the Foreign Policy Debate Irrelevant?"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

"A candidate's policy towards Iran, Afghanistan, or China will have to share center stage with the unpredicted, the incidental, and the utterly dramatic once he becomes president or wins a second term. The stylized theatrics of a debate stand in sharp contrast to the randomness of the world."

 

 

AP Photo

October 18, 2012

"Foreign Policy and the Parental Perspective"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

"In that brief moment, a real distinction between the candidates on world affairs became clear: Romney believes in the war-on-terror model of foreign policy, in which events get pasted into a larger narrative of fighting terrorism — the 'Bush doctrine' applied to Libya. Obama believes in a foreign policy that deals with each situation individually, as a challenge to be answered."

 

 

October 17, 2012

"Advice To The Next President: National And Homeland Security"

Op-Ed, WBUR

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School and Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

"Having a professional military means that the United States can go to war while the vast majority of citizens are not directly affected. Therefore it falls upon the president, more than any other individual, to make sure the nation goes to war only if and when absolutely necessary."

 

 

October 15, 2012

"Khadafy Son Should Be Tried by Libya"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

"The ICC represents the proposition that newly free nations should punish their abusive former leaders through court, rather than summary execution. It suggests that a legal reckoning with the past can help countries break free of horrible legacies. Instead of challenging Libya's efforts to do just that, the ICC could have assisted in its investigation and provided the technical advice necessary to help Libya become a nation under rule of law."

 

 

October 11, 2012

"The Toughest Sanctions"

Op-Ed, Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy (on Leave)

"Companies that manage the transport of all these resources can have tremendous impact on any nation's survival, making the movement of goods across the seas an unrecognized animating force in foreign affairs. The sanctions and the resulting economic crisis made the route through the Strait of Hormuz unsustainable for this major shipping line."

 

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