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Juliette Kayyem

Juliette Kayyem

Lecturer in Public Policy

Member of the Board, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

Contact:
Telephone: 617-384-7325
Fax: 617-495-8963
Email: juliette_kayeem@hks.harvard.edu

 

 

By Date

 

2012 (continued)

AP Photo

May 14, 2012

"A Crackdown Avoided"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy

"These groups changed the way immigration is discussed in a state that's about as conservative as it gets. Rhetoric about civil rights or racial profiling only goes so far here. Business climate, agricultural interests, and fewer government mandates — that's the language that gained traction."

 

 

May 10, 2012

"A Plot Foiled, but a US Agency Rift Exposed"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy

"The CIA disrupted this latest plot, then got much of the attention. It utilized long-established and very complicated intelligence tactics. Unfortunately, the extent of our infiltration of Al Qaeda has now been exposed. The leaks clearly came from someone intimately involved with the operation; the details are too exacting."

 

 

AP Photo

May 7, 2012

"A Tragedy or Merely Tragic?"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy

"It is a testament to the human rights community that its relevance in global affairs may demand a new vernacular. Major atrocities, and ethnic genocide, are different in scope and magnitude from the plight of a single man. Those familiar slogans — the whole world is watching — are at risk of overuse, and therefore irrelevance, when applied to all things constituting a tragedy and the merely tragic. The Chen case is complicated, but it isn't Bosnia."

 

 

AP Photo

May 3, 2012

"Al Qaeda Loses Its Way"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy

"Today, the Jordanians who have any favorable feelings about Al Qaeda are a paltry 13 percent. By 2006, Al Qaeda began to stray from its anti-Western foundations and focus its wrath on moderate Muslim citizens there and elsewhere. The Jordanians began to turn on bin Laden, and have been turning ever since. Eventually, the United States wound down its operations in Iraq and adopted a less confrontational posture in the Middle East."

 

 

April 30, 2012

"A Revolution: Women Fight in Marines"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy

"The course of history, and the reality of war, are headed towards full inclusion of women into combat roles. The Pentagon's liberalization of some of the combat rules earlier this year — and the promise of further reviews as evidenced in the changes this week — were an acknowledgment that antiquated and inconsistent combat regulations are becoming more difficult to defend in modern warfare."

 

 

April 26, 2012

"Saudi Arabia's Un-Olympic Spirit"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy

"Isolation from the games would have tremendous impact in a country well aware that public opinion is growing exceptionally suspicious of Arab monarchs. It may have domestic rules against women's rights, but to play in the games it should live up to universal, and IOC, standards."

 

 

April 23, 2012

"The Military's Persistent Gender Divide"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy

"Changing the culture of the military toward women requires more than amending the sexual assault procedures. It means changing the combat exclusion rules. All the good words about inclusiveness and gender protection mask a more fundamental division: Women are underrepresented in the highest ranks not because of pervasive sexual assault, but because they are still formally excluded from the most honored role of all, that of combat soldier."

 

 

April 16, 2012

"This is Not a Test"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy

"...[P]eople traveled miles away, believing they had only a few hours before water struck. That belief, stemming from the memory of 2004, was what would have saved the most lives. Indonesians remember one fact: Those who walked away from the water in 2004 survived. Then, whole villages were saved because the memory of a 1907 tsunami had been shared from generation to generation; when the earth moves, so will the oceans. Indeed, more recently built villages, with new immigrants, were completely eviscerated in 2004 because they had no historical sense of what was to come."

 

 

AP Photo

April 12, 2012

"Ozzie Guillen: Why This Controversy, Now?"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy

"The love-for-Castro comment aside, Guillen's whole interview, and his apology, say more about his utter bewilderment that the powerful United States has never been able to get past Fidel Castro and focus on strategic interests with a nation so close by."

 

 

AP Photo

April 9, 2012

"The Self-destruction of Arizona"

Op-Ed, The Boston Globe

By Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer in Public Policy

"Later this week the heads of state and government of 34 nations in this hemisphere will meet in Cartagena, Colombia, at the sixth Summit of the Americas. Obama will be there, and all our American brethren, minus Cuba and Ecuador, will too. They will talk about their economies, energy supplies, trade agreements, and commerce. They will talk about drugs, of course, and the insatiable US appetite for them. But they will not be talking about whether classes in Hispanic studies are inherently anti-Anglo."

 

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