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Paul Kane

Paul Kane

Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, February 2004ľAugust 2008

 

Experience

Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, February 2004ľAugust 2008

Current Affiliation: U.S. Marine Corps, Silver Spring, Maryland

 

 

By Date

 

2008

AP Photo

March 19, 2008

Five Years Into Iraq: A Report Card

Media Feature

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School, Kevin Ryan, Director, Defense and Intelligence Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Meghan L. O'Sullivan, Jeane Kirkpatrick Professor of the Practice of International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, Eric Rosenbach, Faculty Affiliate, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (on leave) and Paul Kane, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, February 2004ľAugust 2008

With the war in Iraq stretching past the five-year mark, experts weigh in on what has gone right, what has gone wrong, and lessons learned. Paul Kane, a Marine veteran of Iraq, writes of the “serious disconnect” between civilians and those who have served in uniform, while Meghan O’Sullivan, former deputy national security advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan, says that today “we have the right strategy in place — and it is making a difference on the ground.”

 

2007

September 19, 2007

"We Owe It to Iraq to Set Aside Partisan Politics"

Op-Ed, Financial Times, Letter to the Editor

By Paul Kane, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, February 2004ľAugust 2008

Sir, Clive Crook’s article on Iraq (“America’s wishful thinking”, September 13) provides a lucid analysis and rightly points to the imperative for a bipartisan, “centrist” solution....

 

 

September 7, 2007

"More Finger-Pointing Over Iraq"

Op-Ed, New York Times, Letter to the Editor

By Paul Kane, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, February 2004ľAugust 2008

The following letter was written in response to L. Paul Bremer III's op-ed "How I Didn’t Dismantle Iraq’s Army" which appeared in The New York Times on September 6, 2007.

 

 

AP Images

September 7, 2007

Iraq Progress Report: Reading Between the Lines

Media Feature

By Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs; Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, Harvard Kennedy School, Kevin Ryan, Director, Defense and Intelligence Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Paul Kane, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, February 2004ľAugust 2008, Eric Rosenbach, Faculty Affiliate, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (on leave) and Stephen M. Walt, Robert and Renée Belfer Professor of International Affairs; Faculty Chair, International Security Program

With Gen. David H. Petraeus scheduled to appear before Congress next week, Belfer Center experts and researchers offer their insights and analysis — as well as items that Congress should not overlook.

 

2006

April 20, 2006

A Peaceful Call to Arms

Op-Ed, New York Times

By Paul Kane, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, February 2004ľAugust 2008

 

2005

August 20, 2005

Whose Children Will Go to War?

Op-Ed, New York Times, Letter to the Editor

By Paul Kane, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, February 2004ľAugust 2008

 

2004

Winter 2004-05

To the Shores of Tripoli

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Paul Kane, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, February 2004ľAugust 2008

One of the earliest victories of the U.S. Marine Corps occurred in 1801 during the Barbary War. Lieutenant Presley O'Bannon led a small band of men across 500 miles of desert to attack Tripoli. Lt. O'Bannon became an instant national hero with the victory, and the battle was later immortalized in The Marines Hymn. Despite his accomplishments, however, O'Bannon grew frustrated with what he perceived to be bureaucracy, and two years later, he resigned and left the Marines. The early Corps was authorized to have only four captains: O'Bannon, the most decorated Marine, could not be promoted. The Marine Corps lacked an effective mechanism for listening to its people and changing to retain its best.

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July, 2004

Marine Corps Reserve Forces in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Marine Corps Gazette, Quantico, Va., issue 7, volume Vol. 88

By Paul Kane, Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, February 2004ľAugust 2008

 

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