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Martin B. Malin

Mailing address

One Brattle Square 529
Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
79 John F. Kennedy Street, Mailbox 134
Cambridge, MA, 02138

Martin B. Malin

Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom

Contact:
Telephone: 617-496-0432
Fax: 617-496-0606
Email: martin_malin@harvard.edu

 

Experience

Martin B. Malin is the Executive Director of the Project on Managing the Atom at the Belfer Center.  His research focuses on arms control and nonproliferation in the Middle East, U.S. nonproliferation and counter-proliferation strategies, and the security consequences of the growth and spread of nuclear energy.  His recent work includes a review of strategies for preventing illicit trade in nuclear-related technology, an examination of Israeli leaders’ perception of the threat of a nuclear-armed Iran, and an analysis of the regional conditions conducive to the creation of a WMD-free zone in the Middle East.

Prior to coming to the Kennedy School, Malin taught courses on international relations, American foreign policy, and Middle East politics at Columbia University, Barnard College, and Rutgers University. He also served as Director of the Program on Science and Global Security at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He co-edited the American Academy Studies in Global Security book series (MIT Press).  He holds a B.A. in Middle East Studies from the University of California at Santa Cruz, a Masters of International of Affairs from Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs (where he served as editor-in-chief of the Journal of International Affairs), and has a Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University.

 

 

By Date

 

2016

April 12, 2016

"The gift of reminding everyone that disarmament still matters"

Op-Ed, Nuclear Security Matters

By Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom

"My colleague Matthew Bunn has argued that nuclear security provides a foundation for all three pillars of the NPT. I agree with him. An act of nuclear terrorism would likely put an end to the growth and spread of nuclear energy. Nonproliferation cannot be achieved as long as stocks of highly enriched uranium or plutonium remain vulnerable to theft. And states will not give up the arsenals they possess as long as they believe that agents of an enemy state could steal nuclear weapons or materials to acquire a nuclear capability overnight..."

 

 

Spring 2016

"Belfer Experts Work to Strengthen Nuclear Security"

Newsletter Article, Belfer Center Newsletter

By Nickolas Roth, Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom and Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom

In the months and weeks before the 2016 Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, D.C., Belfer experts promoted a series of ideas to strengthen measures to prevent terrorists from acquiring nuclear weapons or the essential ingre­dients to make them.

 

 

March 31, 2016

"Will the Nuclear Security Summit Help Stop Terrorists from Getting the Bomb?"

Op-Ed, The National Interest

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom and Nickolas Roth, Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

"Today and tomorrow, world leaders will gather for what will likely be the final international summit on security for nuclear weapons and the materials needed to make them—a key tool for preventing nuclear terrorism. The last time this group met, at the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit in the Hague, they declared that preventing terrorists from acquiring nuclear weapons or weapons-usable materials remained “one of the most important challenges in the years to come.” Yet, since then, nuclear security has improved only marginally, while the capabilities of some terrorist groups, particularly the Islamic State, have grown dramatically, suggesting that in the net, the risk of nuclear terrorism may be higher than it was two years ago..."

 

 

March 27, 2016

"Nuclear security: Continuous improvement or dangerous decline?"

Op-Ed, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom, William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Nickolas Roth, Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

"World leaders face a stark choice at the final Nuclear Security Summit later this week: Will they commit to efforts that continue to improve security for nuclear weapons, fissile materials, and nuclear facilities, or will the 2016 summit be seen in retrospect as the point at which attention drifted elsewhere, and nuclear security stalled and began to decline? The answer will shape the chances that terrorist groups, including the Islamic State, could get their hands on the materials they need to build a crude nuclear bomb...."

 

 

March 21, 2016

Preventing Nuclear Terrorism: Continuous Improvement or Dangerous Decline?

Report

By Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom, William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom and Nickolas Roth, Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

In this new report, Preventing Nuclear Terrorism: Continuous Improvement or Dangerous Decline?, Matthew Bunn, Martin Malin, Nickolas Roth, and William Tobey provide a global reality check on nuclear security. They note that effective and sustainable nuclear security capable of addressing plausible threats is the single most effective chokepoint preventing terrorists from acquiring a nuclear weapon.

 

 

February 2, 2016

"After JCPOA: Has the risk of Middle East nuclear proliferation waned?"

News

By Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom

Just one week after “implementation day,” when Iran completed its nuclear commitments and the nuclear-related sanctions were lifted, Martin B. Malin, Executive Director of the Project to Manage the Atom at Harvard University’s Belfer Center, spoke about the current state of non-proliferation affairs in the Middle East with Michael Moran, Visiting Media Fellow on Peace and Security at Carnegie Corporation of New York.

 

2015

December 7, 2015

Five Takeaways from the IAEA's Report on Iran's Nuclear Past

Op-Ed, The Huffington Post

By Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom

"The International Atomic Energy Agency drew several important conclusions in the report it released last week on the weapons-related elements of Iran's past nuclear activities..."

 

 

September 15, 2015

"Implementing the Iran Nuclear Deal: Balancing Confrontation and Cooperation"

Media Feature

By Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom, Matthew Bunn, Professor of Practice; Co-Principal Investigator, Project on Managing the Atom and William H. Tobey, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

The “Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action”—the nuclear agreement between the P5+1 and Iran—will enter the implementation phase within months. US policy makers must now consider how best to strengthen the accord as implementation approaches, and in how best engage Iran as implementation proceeds. In this discussion, nonproliferation experts William H. Tobey and Matthew Bunn discuss how to strike an effective balance between cooperation and confrontation in dealing with Iran on the nuclear agreement and beyond. The discussion was moderated by Martin B. Malin and followed by Q&A with the audience.

 

 

May 11, 2015

"On the Road to Nowhere? New Proposals on the Middle East WMD-Free Zone May Backfire"

Op-Ed, European Leadership Network

By Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom

"One of the dramas playing out this month in New York at the 2015 Review Conference for parties to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) concerns the future of discussions on establishing the weapons of mass destruction free zone in the Middle East..."

 

 

April 26, 2015

"Fresh Ideas for the Future: Symposium on the NPT"

Event Report

By Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom and William C. Potter

The abstracts in this booklet summarise the research presented at an academic symposium convened on the sidelines of the 2015 NPT Review Conference. As we write this, journalists and seasoned experts in the nuclear policy field have been speculating about the particularly difficult challenges facing the Review Conference this year. To address those challenges, we would urge all concerned to consider the ideas and analyses presented at this symposium. Experts would be hard-pressed to find a better collection of fresh ideas and approaches for assessing and strengthening the NPT.

 
Events Calendar

We host a busy schedule of events throughout the fall, winter and spring. Past guests include: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, former Vice President Al Gore, and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev.