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Ehud Eiran

Ehud Eiran

Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

 

 

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Summer 2013

"The Sum of all Fears: Israel’s Perception of a Nuclear-Armed Iran"

Journal Article, Washington Quarterly, issue 36, volume 3

By Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom and Ehud Eiran, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

President Rouhani's initiative to restart nuclear negotiations has been met with deep skepticism in Israel. Haifa University political scientist Ehud Eiran and MTA Executive Director Martin Malin suggest in the current issue of The Washington Quarterly that Israel's framing of, and response to, the Iranian nuclear program is a product of four distinct fears: existential threat, strategic risk, socio-economic erosion, and a challenge to founding principles. Understanding the sources and consequences of these fears can help policy makers avoid dangerous pitfalls and missed opportunities in their response to the current Iranian initiative.

 

 

AP Photo

March 18, 2011

"What Makes Alliances Last"

Op-Ed, Haaretz

By Ehud Eiran, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

"...[W]e cannot rest on our laurels. Just as our non-democratic neighbors may become more democratic, we risk becoming less so. A host of legislative measures, attacks on academics in universities, and openly discriminatory calls by religious and political leaders suggest that our commitment to an open society that respects minority rights may be weakening."

 

Summer 2013

"The Sum of all Fears: Israel’s Perception of a Nuclear-Armed Iran"

Journal Article, Washington Quarterly, issue 36, volume 3

By Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom and Ehud Eiran, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

President Rouhani's initiative to restart nuclear negotiations has been met with deep skepticism in Israel. Haifa University political scientist Ehud Eiran and MTA Executive Director Martin Malin suggest in the current issue of The Washington Quarterly that Israel's framing of, and response to, the Iranian nuclear program is a product of four distinct fears: existential threat, strategic risk, socio-economic erosion, and a challenge to founding principles. Understanding the sources and consequences of these fears can help policy makers avoid dangerous pitfalls and missed opportunities in their response to the current Iranian initiative.

 

 

AP Photo

March 18, 2011

"What Makes Alliances Last"

Op-Ed, Haaretz

By Ehud Eiran, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

"...[W]e cannot rest on our laurels. Just as our non-democratic neighbors may become more democratic, we risk becoming less so. A host of legislative measures, attacks on academics in universities, and openly discriminatory calls by religious and political leaders suggest that our commitment to an open society that respects minority rights may be weakening."

 

AP Photo

March 18, 2011

"What Makes Alliances Last"

Op-Ed, Haaretz

By Ehud Eiran, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

"...[W]e cannot rest on our laurels. Just as our non-democratic neighbors may become more democratic, we risk becoming less so. A host of legislative measures, attacks on academics in universities, and openly discriminatory calls by religious and political leaders suggest that our commitment to an open society that respects minority rights may be weakening."

 

Summer 2013

"The Sum of all Fears: Israel’s Perception of a Nuclear-Armed Iran"

Journal Article, Washington Quarterly, issue 36, volume 3

By Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom and Ehud Eiran, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

President Rouhani's initiative to restart nuclear negotiations has been met with deep skepticism in Israel. Haifa University political scientist Ehud Eiran and MTA Executive Director Martin Malin suggest in the current issue of The Washington Quarterly that Israel's framing of, and response to, the Iranian nuclear program is a product of four distinct fears: existential threat, strategic risk, socio-economic erosion, and a challenge to founding principles. Understanding the sources and consequences of these fears can help policy makers avoid dangerous pitfalls and missed opportunities in their response to the current Iranian initiative.

 

November 26, 2008

"In the Name of Peace, Israelis and Palestinians Should Become European"

Op-Ed, Christian Science Monitor

By Richard N. Rosecrance, Adjunct Professor; International Security Program; Director, Project on U.S.-China Relations and Ehud Eiran, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

"...The dual identity of a supranational entity comprised of peaceful national states holds the answer for both sides' most profound concerns. For Israelis, EU membership offers physical security and permanent legitimacy. For Palestinians, membership means a territorial settlement, including a return, of sorts, of their lands through the new joint European source of security and authority over them."

 

Oren Rozen Photo

July 11, 2014

"The 'Price' of Radical Flanks and the Conflict in Gaza"

Op-Ed, Washington Post, Monkey Cage Blog

By Peter Krause, Research Fellow, International Security Program and Ehud Eiran, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

"...[A]lthough the leaderships of Israel and the Palestinians did not order these killings, it also true that these attacks are symptoms of a broader phenomenon: Radical flank groups that are willing to take risks to capture territory or coerce the enemy to the (potential) benefit of their movements, but whose extreme rhetoric and actions can also blacken their reputation and chain-gang them into undesirable conflicts."

 

 

Summer 2013

"The Sum of all Fears: Israel’s Perception of a Nuclear-Armed Iran"

Journal Article, Washington Quarterly, issue 36, volume 3

By Martin B. Malin, Executive Director, Project on Managing the Atom and Ehud Eiran, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

President Rouhani's initiative to restart nuclear negotiations has been met with deep skepticism in Israel. Haifa University political scientist Ehud Eiran and MTA Executive Director Martin Malin suggest in the current issue of The Washington Quarterly that Israel's framing of, and response to, the Iranian nuclear program is a product of four distinct fears: existential threat, strategic risk, socio-economic erosion, and a challenge to founding principles. Understanding the sources and consequences of these fears can help policy makers avoid dangerous pitfalls and missed opportunities in their response to the current Iranian initiative.

 

 

AP Photo

March 18, 2011

"What Makes Alliances Last"

Op-Ed, Haaretz

By Ehud Eiran, Former Associate, International Security Program, 2010–2011; Former Research Fellow, International Security Program, 2005–2010

"...[W]e cannot rest on our laurels. Just as our non-democratic neighbors may become more democratic, we risk becoming less so. A host of legislative measures, attacks on academics in universities, and openly discriminatory calls by religious and political leaders suggest that our commitment to an open society that respects minority rights may be weakening."

 

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