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Hassan Abbas

Hassan Abbas

Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

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Website: http://www.watandost.blogspot.com/

 

 

By Publication Type

 

November 2005

"A Failure to Communicate: American Public Diplomacy and the Islamic World"

Book Chapter

By Hassan Abbas, Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

 

AP Photo

February 2008

"The Pakistan Elections: What Next?"

Event Summary

By Eric Bjornlund, Hassan Abbas, Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Hasan-Askari Rizvi and Dr. Marvin G. Weinbaum

On February 18, Pakistanis voted in parliamentary elections. The results were a major blow to President Pervez Musharraf and his supporters. Opposition parties, led by the Pakistan People’s Party (PPP), Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N), and a resurgent Awami National Party (ANP), scored major victories. The prime losers were the ruling Pakistan Muslim League-Quaid (PML-Q) and Islamists. How can these elections be assessed, and what do they portend for Pakistan’s future and for U.S. policy? These questions were examined at an Asia Program event held one week after the elections.

 

AP Photo

April 2009

"Defining the Punjabi Taliban Network"

Journal Article, CTC Sentinel, issue 4, volume 2

By Hassan Abbas, Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"The Punjabi Taliban network is a loose conglomeration of members of banned militant groups of Punjabi origin—sectarian as well as those focused on the conflict in Kashmir—that have developed strong connections with Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), Afghan Taliban and other militant groups based in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and North-West Frontier Province (NWFP). They shuttle between FATA and the rest of Pakistan, providing logistical support to FATA- and Afghan-based militants to conduct terrorist operations deep inside Pakistan. Between March 2005 and March 2007 alone, for example, about 2,000 militants from southern and northern Punjab Province reportedly moved to South Waziristan and started different businesses in an effort to create logistical support networks. Given their knowledge about Punjabi cities and security structure, they have proved to be valuable partners for the TTP as it targets cities in Punjab, such as Lahore, Rawalpindi and Islamabad...."

 

 

AP Photo

September 2008

"From FATA to the NWFP: The Taliban Spread Their Grip in Pakistan"

Journal Article, CTC Sentinel, issue 10, volume 1

By Hassan Abbas, Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"...Any effort to stem the tide of extremism in the NWFP first requires a dispassionate analysis of the ground realities. This article attempts to examine such indicators, by explaining how the Taliban have managed to spread their influence from FATA into the NWFP, and will present some ideas on how to reverse extremist trends...."

 

 

AP Photo

January 2008

"A Profile of Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan"

Journal Article, CTC Sentinel, issue 2, volume 1

By Hassan Abbas, Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"The organizational strength, military strategy and leadership quality of the Taliban in Pakistan's tribal territories has qualitatively improved during the last few years. At the time of the U.S.-led military campaign in Afghanistan in late 2001, allies and sympathizers of the Taliban in Pakistan were not identified as 'Taliban' themselves. That reality is now a distant memory. Today, Pakistan's indigenous Taliban are an effective fighting force and are engaging the Pakistani military on one side and NATO forces on the other."

 

 

Spring 2006

"'Islam versus the West' and the Political Thought of AbdolKarim Soroush"

Journal Article, al Nakhlah, The Fletcher School Online Journal for Issues Related to Southwest Asia and Islamic Civilization

By Hassan Abbas, Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"Extremist forces in the Muslim world can only be defeated if progressive forces in both the West and the Islamic world cooperate to tackle the issue through dialogue and constructive engagement. A partnership is required. A unilateral campaign by the West to win the hearts and minds of Muslims without listening to their concerns or enlisting their aid will not succeed."

 

 

Winter 2006

"Pakistan Through the Lens of the 'Triple A' Theory"

Journal Article, The Fletcher Forum of World Affairs, issue 1, volume 30

By Hassan Abbas, Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"How has a state whose founding fathers were secular people who believed in rule of law and democracy drifted toward religious extremism and authoritarianism? Three primary factors—variations on the Triple A theory of influence (Allah, the Army, and America)—have led Pakistan down this path: a powerful independent military, the mushrooming of religious militant groups, and the hydra-headed monster that is the intelligence services."

 

AP Photo

September 16, 2008

"Pakistan: Counter-terror Policy is in Disarray"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Oxford Analytica

By Hassan Abbas, Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"A cross-border raid by US ground forces, together with media claims that US President George Bush had authorised Special Operations troops to conduct such operations without seeking permission from Islamabad, has provoked anger from Pakistan's politicians, media and army. Pakistan's counter-terrorism policy may suffer as US-Pakistan relations deteriorate."

 

 

AP Photo

April 3, 2008

"Pakistan PM Has Good Credentials, Limited Authority"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Oxford Analytica

By Hassan Abbas, Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"Gilani is leader of a coalition government with a strong mandate but facing difficult problems. It is also committed to policies that could cause turbulence, particularly reinstating judges deposed by President Pervez Musharraf. Gilani's position is further complicated by political circumstances, with the leaders of the dominant parties in the ruling coalition directing policy from outside parliament."

 

 

imranthetrekker

February 15, 2008

"Pakistan: Opposition Parties Are Poised to Win Poll"

Magazine or Newspaper Article, Oxford Analytica

By Hassan Abbas, Former Senior Advisor, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

"While there is a considerable risk that the elections will be rigged and that poor security will deter voting, pro-Musharraf parties will be swept from power. The PPP is expected to secure the most votes, raising the prospect of a grand coalition of parties united in opposition to the president. Stable government will depend on their ability to work together, as well as with Musharraf, for as long as he remains in power."

 

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